What I Read in May

Prairie Tale: A Memoir by Melissa Gilbert. Copyright 2009 by Half Pint Enterprises. Published by Simon Spotlight Enterprises, a division of Simon and Schuster, Inc.

 

I first thought this book would be about the author’s experiences starring as Laura on Little House on the Prairie, but it’s not just about that. It’s Melissa Gilbert’s autobiography from her birth until 2009 including photographs.

She describes what it was like to learn as a child that she was unwanted, given up for adoption at birth. She emphasizes the fact that she was taught to hide her feelings and pretend everything was okay during her parents’ divorce, her mother’s re-marrying, her father’s death, and other heartbreaking events during her life. She talks about being involved in Gun Smoke and other movies before she signed on to the cast of Little House on the Prairie.

During her ten years on this television series, she gives detailed descriptions of filming certain episodes, describing how Michael Landon, who wrote and directed the series and starred as Pa, became a surrogate father to her, the irony of how she developed a close friendship with the actress who portrayed Nellie, the nasty little girl who goes to school with Laura, and how she didn’t always get along with Melissa Sue Anderson, who played Laura’s older sister Mary. She also discusses her involvement in The Miracle Worker, The Diary of Ann Frank, and other projects during this time. At the end of those ten years, she explains how Michael Landon wrote the last episode in which the town of Walnut Grove is destroyed to get back at NBC executives for canceling the show.

After Little House, Melissa Gilbert describes the myriad of movies and television programs in which she was involved. She also talks about her relationships with Allan Greenspan and others, her failed marriages to actor Rob Lowe and playwright Bo Brinkman, and her marriage to actor Bruce Boxleitner, and the birth of her two sons, Dakota and Michael. She also talks about saying goodbye to Michael Landon when he was diagnosed with liver cancer and passed away. She discusses her law suit against The National Inquirer over a story they printed that was fabricated by Bo Brinkman and how the stress caused her to give birth to Michael prematurely.

Melissa Gilbert also describes how she became the president of the Screen Actors Guild during the earlier part of this century. She discusses her bout with alcoholism and her work with terminally ill children. She ends the book by describing how she played Ma in a musical production of Little House on the Prairie in Minneapolis and visited Walnut Grove, Minnesota, and Desmet, South Dakota, where Laura Ingalls Wilder spent part of her life.

Reading this book made me realize that the Little House television series sensationalized Laura Ingalls Wilder’s story. Melissa Gilbert’s fans coveted her idyllic Laura Ingalls Wilder life, but Laura Ingalls Wilder’s life was far from idyllic, and although Melissa Gilbert’s family wasn’t battling blizzards, drought, and grasshoppers, she still had her demons.

 

A Little House Sampler by Laura Ingalls Wilder and Rose Wilder Lane. Edited by William T. Anderson. Copyright 1988 by the University of Nebraska Press.

 

This is a collection of essays, poems, and short stories by Laura Ingalls Wilder and her daughter Rose Wilder Lane that appeared in various magazines during the earlier part of the 19th century. Presented in chronological order, much of this work, not contained in Laura’s Little House series, covers her life growing up, her journey with her husband Almanzo and Rose from Desmet, South Dakota, to Mansfield, Missouri, and her life on Rocky Ridge Farm once they were settled in Missouri. This collection also includes some short fiction by Rose that was inspired by their experiences. The editor introduces each piece, and in an epilog, he provides additional information about this mother and daughter’s careers, and of course there are pictures.

I found some of the pieces boring, especially Laura’s articles about her kitchen and dining room on the farm. Others were fascinating. To my astonishment, I learned that Laura’s sister Mary’s blindness was caused by spinal meningitis, not scarlet fever, as indicated in the Little House books. I was interested to read a conversation between Rose and her father about the price of furniture, horses, and farm implements in 1878. I definitely recommend this book to anyone who enjoyed Laura Ingalls Wilder’s Little House series as a child.

 

Love, Rosie by Cecelia Ahern Copyright 2005

 

This is the story of love between two friends in Ireland, a love that withstands many years of separation. The author tells it in an unusual way through notes passed in school, letters, e-mail and text messages, newspaper articles, and other documents. Alex and Rosie go to school together as children in Dublin and become best friends. In their last year of high school, Alex’s family moves to Boston, Massachusetts, but he and Rosie still keep in touch over the years and visit each other occasionally. When they graduate, Alex is accepted to Harvard, and Rosie plans to attend Boston College to study hotel management. However, when Alex is unable to return to Ireland to accompany Rosie to the last dance of the school year, she is compelled to go with Brian, another boy in her class. They have a one night stand, and when she gets pregnant, he leaves town.

Rosie cancels her plans to go to college, has a daughter, Katy, works at a string of dead end jobs to make ends meet, marries Greg, and divorces him several years later when she finds him cheating on her. She eventually gets her degree in hotel management and opens a bed and breakfast near the beach. On the other hand, Alex becomes a successful heart surgeon in Boston, marries and divorces twice, and has two children. After almost fifty years, Alex and Rosie are together for good, their romantic dream a reality.

There are a couple of reasons why I didn’t want to finish this book. First of all, I found all the note passing and text messaging unrealistic. Yes, children pass notes in school, but at the fast and furious rate these messages seem to be flying, it’s a wonder Rosie and Alex didn’t get caught more often. As an adult, Rosie texts her family and friends constantly while at work. I was afraid that at any minute, her boss would catch her, and she would lose her job. She is fired once, and that could have been the reason. I’ve never known anyone who texts as often as Rosie and other characters do. I would have liked to see more narrative mixed with messages.

Then, there’s Rosie’s attitude. When she becomes pregnant with Brian’s child, she blames Alex for not being able to come to the dance, thus forcing her to go with Brian and then to sleep with him and become pregnant with his child. I kept thinking that she didn’t have to have sex with Brian, or she could have decided not to keep the baby and go on with her life. When she discovers Greg is cheating on her and decides to move to Boston so she can re-kindle her relationship with Alex who is divorced from his first wife, she receives a letter from Brian, living in Spain, who wants to get to know Katy. She decides to stay in Ireland for that reason and blames Alex for that, too. I wanted to tell her that she could have moved to Boston, and Brian could have just gotten to know Katy there. Then, I wanted to delete the book from my device and not give it another thought, but after some serious consideration, I realized that I wanted to know how it ends, and I’m glad I stuck with it. I like the epilog, a narrative told from Rosie’s point of view, in which she and Alex come together, both free, both ready to love each other.

 

Abbie Johnson Taylor, Author

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2 thoughts on “What I Read in May

  1. Love all this information about Laura Ingalls Wilder. My children and I loved all The Little House books.
    See my words at:
    gramswisewords.blogspot.com

    • Thank you, Maz, for visiting my blog. Please check back often. I try to update once a week, and you can subscribe to receive posts by e-mail as soon as they’re live. I plan to read a couple of Rose Wilder Lane’s novels and will share my impressions when I do.

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