Saturday song: Breath of Heaven by Amy Grant

I’m not sure when this came out, but when I first heard it in 2005, I was captivated. Most sacred Christmas carols are about the joy and celebration surrounding the birth of Christ, but not many people have considered how the Virgin Mary felt upon learning she was pregnant with the Messiah. At first, not even Joseph believed that God was the father of her child. Can you imagine how that would feel?

In 2006 after my late husband Bill suffered his first stroke, this song kept going through my head. I realized that it was because I could identify with Mary. Although I wasn’t a virgin pregnant with the Son of God and considered a hor by family, friends, and even the man I loved, I still felt alone and afraid with an uncertain future because Bill was so changed after his stroke, and we weren’t sure if he would walk again.

You can read more of our story in My Ideal Partner. Meanwhile, if you haven’t heard this song before, I hope it resonates with you as it did with me.

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Author Abbie Johnson Taylor

We Shall Overcome

How to Build a Better Mousetrap: Recollections and Reflections of a Family Caregiver

That’s Life: New and Selected Poems

My Ideal Partner: How I Met, Married, and Cared for the Man I Loved Despite Debilitating Odds

Click to hear an audio trailer.

Like me on Facebook.

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Review: The Christmas Carriage and Other Writings of the Holiday Season

Here’s a review I posted last year. This is a great holiday book worth reading again and again.

My Corner

Abbie-1The Christmas Carriage and Other Writings of the Holiday Season

By Alice Jane-Marie Massa

Copyright 2016.

This collection of short fiction, poetry, and essays spans from Thanksgiving through New Year’s and beyond. In “The Thanksgiving Phone,” a blind woman finds a cell phone belonging to another woman whose son is in the military, serving overseas. In the title piece, a widow gets her long-awaited Christmas wish and more.

In “The Puppies of New Year’s Eve,” a dog breeder and a woman who buys two of his puppies discover they have a lot in common on a stormy New Year’s Eve. The author’s essays and poetry explore her holiday experiences while growing up in the 1950’s and 1960’s, adventures with her guide dog, and other topics. Instructions for playing a Thanksgiving poetry game and making Christmas cards are included.

I met Alice several years ago when she joined Behind Our Eyes

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What If There Were No B’s

Thanks to Jimmie Kepler for inspiring this post. In this little piece he wrote for his granddaughter, he reflects on what life would be like without the letter C. Well, have you ever thought of what life would be like without the letter B?

For reakfast this morning, I would have had oatmeal, orange juice, and an anana. Because of my limited vision, I would e writing this log post in raille. When I go out later, I would put on my oots. At the end of the day, I would stretch out in my recliner with a good ook.

You see, life wouldn’t be the same without the letter B, either. In fact, every letter of the alphabet is important.

Now it’s your turn. Pick a letter of the alphabet and write about what your life would be like without it. If you’re an elementary school teacher, you might want to try this activity with your students. In any case, please feel free to share your results in the comments field. Have a lessed day.

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Author Abbie Johnson Taylor

We Shall Overcome

How to Build a Better Mousetrap: Recollections and Reflections of a Family Caregiver

That’s Life: New and Selected Poems

My Ideal Partner: How I Met, Married, and Cared for the Man I Loved Despite Debilitating Odds

Click to hear an audio trailer.

Like me on Facebook.

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Saturday Song: O Christmas Tree

Some people decorate their homes for the holidays before Thanksgiving, but when I was a kid, we usually waited until the first or second week of December. In Tucson, Arizona, during the 1960’s and early 70’s, we drove to a lot each year where we picked out a tree. Despite my limited vision, I could see the trees and loved the smell and feel of the branches.

We didn’t have a truck, and I can’t remember how we got the selected tree home, but we did. My younger brother and I watched while Dad and Mother put the tree in the stand and strung the lights. Then the fun began.

My favorite task was hanging colored balls and candy canes on lower branches. We didn’t use garlands or tinsel because the cats wreaked havoc with them, but we had antique angels and other Christmas symbols that my mother hung on higher branches.

After we moved here to Sheridan, Wyoming, in 1973, we bought our trees from an indoor warehouse instead of an outdoor lot. Although my father could wield a chain saw with the best of them, I don’t know why we didn’t trek to the mountains and chop down a tree. I bet that would have been fun.

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What do you remember about decorating your home for the holidays? Did you ever go into the woods and chop down a tree? I’d love to hear about your memories and hope you find the perfect tree this year. Have a great Saturday.

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Author Abbie Johnson Taylor

We Shall Overcome

How to Build a Better Mousetrap: Recollections and Reflections of a Family Caregiver

That’s Life: New and Selected Poems

My Ideal Partner: How I Met, Married, and Cared for the Man I Loved Despite Debilitating Odds

Click to hear an audio trailer.

Like me on Facebook.

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