Thankful for My Writer Friends

My post a week ago Tuesday was inspired by author Alice Massa’s month-long series on gratitude. Now here’s the last installment which includes information about her book, The Christmas Carriage. Of course she mentions me as well. Thank you, Alice, for the shout-out to all your writer friends.

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A Month–Not Just a Day–of Thanks:

 

Part 5.  Thankful for My Writer Friends

by Alice Jane-Marie Massa

Despite all the hustle and bustle, the shopping and planning for the holiday season, the calendar still proclaims “November”–the month of thanks.  Although I must admit that I have on my dining room table (most often, my “office table”) some gifts which I need to wrap and although I have placed a few items of holiday decor in my townhouse, my turkey and pumpkin autumnal decor predominates.  Thus, I can still announce one more part of my thankfulness for this 2018 month of thanks.  While picking just a handful of “gratitude” for this blog is challenging, I decided that this week I will focus on my thankfulness for my writer friends.

After retiring from teaching in 2011, I joined an international group of writers with disabilities–Behind Our Eyes.  Through this organization and…

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Thursday Book Feature: Fishing for Maui

Image contains: me, smiling.Fishing for Maui

by Isa Pearl Ritchie

Copyright 2018.

 

This novel about food, family, and mental illness is set in a Maui village off the coast of New Zealand. Main characters include Valerie, a doctor and mother of four children; Elena, her oldest daughter who is pregnant and writes a food blog; Michael, her oldest son, a university student obsessed with surfing and his heritage; her younger son John, sixteen, and her daughter Rosa, eight. Over the course of a year, Elena discovers her partner is having an affair; Michael is diagnosed with psychosis; John leaves school, and Rosa is struggling to make sense of everything. The book includes recipes.

I like the way the author takes us into the minds of each character by alternating the storytelling from each character’s point of view. I found the snippets of information about Maui culture interesting. A review I recently read said this book should be read in November, but I think it could be read any time of year. Since it takes place in a coastal village, it could even be a summer beach read.

 

My Books

 

My Ideal Partner: How I Met, Married, and Cared for the Man I Loved Despite Debilitating Odds

That’s Life: New and Selected Poems

How to Build a better Mousetrap: Recollections and Reflections of a Family Caregiver

We Shall Overcome

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My Other Links

Visit my website.

Like me on Facebook.

 

Wednesday Words Poetry Challenge: Safe and Cold (Synonyms Only)

Image contains: me, smiling.This feature was created by Collene Chesebro. The words this week are “safe” and “cold.” In the following, I used “chilly” and “free from harm.” You can click the Play button below the Tanka to hear me read it. Here it is.

On a chilly night,
I am warm, free from harm, snug.
A bug on a rug
wouldn’t be nearly as warm
or feel peace or contentment.

 

 

My Books

 

My Ideal Partner: How I Met, Married, and Cared for the Man I Loved Despite Debilitating Odds

That’s Life: New and Selected Poems

How to Build a better Mousetrap: Recollections and Reflections of a Family Caregiver

We Shall Overcome

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My Other Links

Visit my website.

Like me on Facebook.

My Thespian Career

Image contains: me, smiling.A funny thing happened on the way to the forum. What’s that, you might ask. Well, I don’t remember.

I actually tried out for a part in this musical when I was a freshman in high school. If I’d been lucky, I would have been a courtesan about to be sold to a wealthy captain as a wife. I didn’t get the part, though, and the school board canceled the musical because they thought it inappropriate.

That was a rocky start to my haphazard career as an actress. I so wanted to be like my parents, who’d been involved for years in community theater. However, very few directors wanted to cast someone with a visual impairment.

So I joined the speech team, where I won a few awards for dramatic interpretation. A couple of years later, I got the courage to try out for another production, this time a musical for children about a tiger who escapes from a circus and wanders into a hospital children’s ward. This time, the director, who also coached the speech team, was familiar with my acting abilities, despite the fact I couldn’t see very well, and cast me as a little patient with a bandage on her arm. Broadway, here I come, or so I thought.

During my freshman and sophomore years at the local college, my mother was directing plays there, so I was lucky enough to pick up some more crucial roles: Genevieve in The Long Christmas Dinner, Peggy in The Children’s Hour, the narrator in The Reluctant Dragon, and a lady in waiting in Princess on a Pea.

When I transferred to Rocky Mountain  College in Billings, Montana, where I majored in music, and later Montana State University, also in Billings, where I studied music  therapy, I lost interest in acting, although for a while, I participated in the speech team. Now, long story short, I’m a writer with four published books and a fifth on the way. Because of my writing and other obligations I’ve neither the time nor inclination to act, but I still have the memories.

What about you? Have you ever been bitten by the acting bug, so to speak? I’d love to read about your experiences, either on your own blog or in the comment field below. If you decide to write about your theatrical experiences on your own blog, please link to this post so I’ll be sure to read about them. You know, even if you haven’t done any acting, all the world’s a stage, or so they say.

 

My Books

 

My Ideal Partner: How I Met, Married, and Cared for the Man I Loved Despite Debilitating Odds

That’s Life: New and Selected Poems

How to Build a better Mousetrap: Recollections and Reflections of a Family Caregiver

We Shall Overcome

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My Other Links

Visit my website.

Like me on Facebook.

 

Song Lyric Sunday: The First Time Ever I Saw Your Face

Image contains: me, smiling.Song Lyric Sunday was created by Helen Vahdati. The song I’m featuring was popular when I was growing up. Not into romance like other girls, I wasn’t impressed. Now, it’s the only one I can think of that fits Helen’s theme this week of “first.”

I think my late husband Bill, who was totally blind, fell in love with my voice when he first heard it. For me, it wasn’t the first time I saw his face that did it. You can read more of our story in My Ideal Partner. Now here’s the song.

Roberta Flack–The First Time Ever I Saw Your Face
Lyrics Courtesy of Googgle

The first time ever I saw your face
I thought the sun rose in your eyes
And the moon and the stars were the gifts you gave
To the dark and the endless skies
The first time ever I kissed your mouth
I felt the earth move in my hand
Like the trembling heart of a captive bird
That was there at my command my love
And the first time ever I lay with you
I felt your heart so close to mine
And I knew our joy would fill the earth
And last till the end of time my love
The first time ever I saw your face
Your face, your face
Songwriters: Ewan Mccoll
The First Time Ever I Saw Your Face lyrics © The Royalty Network Inc.

 

My Books

 

My Ideal Partner: How I Met, Married, and Cared for the Man I Loved Despite Debilitating Odds

That’s Life: New and Selected Poems

How to Build a better Mousetrap: Recollections and Reflections of a Family Caregiver

We Shall Overcome

My Other Links

Visit my website.

Like me on Facebook.

Conversations With Colleen: Meet Author, Abbie Johnson Taylor

Thanks to Colleen Chesebro for giving me an opportunity to promote my work on her blog today.

Colleen Chesebro ~ The Faery Whisperer

Conversations with ColleenThe October Edition (1)

Hello everyone! Happy Thanksgiving!

This week I’m happy to bring you another new author I’ve just had the pleasure of meeting, Abbie Johnson Taylor. She’s been participating in my weekly poetry challenge each week. I asked her to pick three or four questions from my huge list HERE.

We all aspire to be successful authors and the best way to learn some of the tricks of the trade is to ask questions and learn from each other.

First, please meet my guest, Abbie Johnson Taylor:

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Author, Abbie Johnson Taylor

Abbie Johnson Taylor is the author of a romance novel, two poetry collections, and a memoir and is currently working on another novel. She has a visual impairment and lives in Sheridan, Wyoming, where for six years, she cared for her late husband who was totally blind and partially paralyzed by two strokes.

Before that, she was a registered music…

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Thursday Book Feature: Ready, Set, Poetry

Image contains: me, smiling.Ready, Set, Poetry

By D. P. Lyons

Copyright 2013

 

Deon Lyons is a poet living in Maine who is totally blind. The poems in this collection are divided into four sections: blindness, nature, memories, and holidays. The author writes about losing his vision in 2010, spending time with his grandchildren, and other topics. Each section begins with narrative describing the poems in that particular section. At the end of the book, there’s another narrative passage in which the author talks about his writing and his hopes for the future.

I met Deon several years ago through Behind Our Eyes, an organization of disabled writers to which we belong. Having worked with senior citizens for fifteen years, some of whom, like Deon, lost their vision later in life, I marvel at how positive Deon is in his poetry, despite frustration and depression that accompanies loss of independence. I also enjoyed reading about his childhood memories. Ready, Set, Poetry, is Deon’s second book, and I would like to read more by him.

I recently learned, though, that Deon is battling a life-threatening form of cancer. He is currently in a rehabilitation facility, where he is receiving chemo and physical therapy in the hope that he will have at least two good years with his family. You can click here to learn more. If you believe in the power of prayer, I suggest you include him. I hope that despite his illness, Deon and his family have a lot to be thankful for on this day.

Now here’s a rare treat, a sample poem from Deon’s book. This was recorded by fellow blogger Lynda McKinney Lambert, another member of Behind Our Eyes who also knows Deon. Because there’s no easy way to translate a Kindle file into braille, I was unable to record myself reading this or any of Deon’s other poems. When Lynda sent me this recording so I could share it with his family, I thought this would be a fitting ending to my review. I hope you think so too.

 

 

My Books

 

My Ideal Partner: How I Met, Married, and Cared for the Man I Loved Despite Debilitating Odds

That’s Life: New and Selected Poems

How to Build a better Mousetrap: Recollections and Reflections of a Family Caregiver

We Shall Overcome

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My Other Links

Visit my website.

Like me on Facebook.