Banning Books

If you think book banning is a good idea, read this, and think again. Don’t dictate to others what they shouldn’t read simply because you find it offensive.

K Morris - Poet

A couple of weeks ago, I fell into conversation with a librarian. During the course of our conversation she mentioned that the library does not stock books which their readers might “find offensive”. This exchange got me thinking about how one defines what constitutes “offensive”, and whether something being so classified is a sufficient reason for not allowing it on to the library’s shelves.

The great English author and poet, Rudyard Kipling is loved by people of every race and creed. Yet a number of his writings would, in today’s society be considered “offensive” by many. Take, for instance his poem “The Stranger” which begins thus:

“The Stranger within my gate,
He may be true or kind,
But he does not talk my talk –
I can not feel his mind.
I see the face and the eyes and the mouth,
But not the soul behind.

The men of my…

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Author: abbiejohnsontaylor

I'm the author of two novels,, two poetry collections, and a memoir. My work has appeared in various journals and anthologies. I'm visually impaired and live in Sheridan, Wyoming, where for six years, I cared for my totally blind late husband who was paralyzed by two strokes. Please visit my website at http://www.abbiejohnsontaylor.com.

5 thoughts on “Banning Books”

  1. I love this article, Abbie, and I am so glad you put it out there. When I was a teen I think (I am 77 now), I think the libraries banned Nancy Drew mysteries. I might be wrong on the time, but I remember thinking that one of the best examples of writing about a contemporary young woman who was portrayed as capable mentally and otherwise in her quests to solve mysteries with a friend, and how sad it was to take role models. I remember a lot of books that were banned in my days that should have stayed on shelves, so thank you for speaking up on this troubling issues. We need to be able to form our own ideas about everything we come in contact with, not to have to read only those things someone we don’t even know decrees to be ok and allowing them to ban books THEY don’t like.

    I was sitting in a coffee shop once having a cup and a man came in and started railing on and on about a book I was reading. I cannot even remember the book, but to me, it was a good book, and I did not find anything in it that I would not have wanted to read. After awhile, I turned to him and asked him if he had read it. He stammered and then answered, “No, but I would NEVER read something like that! It’s really immoral.” I asked him how he could know about the book if he had not read it. He stammered and moved away from me, thank heavens! But I thought to myself how sad that someone would only read what others told him was OK to read. So dangerous! Thank you again. Good job!!!

    Liked by 3 people

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