All About Transportation #TMI Tuesday

Why don’t you take a ride with me this week, as I answer these questions about cars? Then, be sure to click on the link below my answers to learn how you can participate in this weekly blog feature.

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What car do you remember your parents owning when you were a child? Do you have any special memories attached to it?

 

When I was eight or nine, growing up during the 1960;’s in Tucson, Arizona, my parents owned two white Mercedes Benz, which they affectionately named. Mother drove 220S Baby, the interior of which, including the seats, was white. Dad drove Buddy, with its dark interior and seats of a dark print color. 220S Baby had air conditioning, necessary during those hot Arizona summers, while Buddy did not. These cars stuck with us until after we moved here to Sheridan, Wyoming, in 1973.

 

How important are cars to you? Could you live without one?

 

If everything was within walking distance, and we didn’t have snow or ice, I could do without a car. I can’t drive one, anyway, because of my visual impairment. But I have two strong legs, and I love to walk. When I need to go somewhere too far to walk, or the weather’s bad, I rely on someone to drive me.

 

In April 2019, Elon Musk predicted that owners of autonomous cars acting as taxis would be able to earn up to $30000 from their vehicle while they weren’t using it. What do you think? The link for the source article is here.

 

If these vehicles could be made safe, I would have no problem with them. As it is now, I’ve heard of accidents happening because the computers didn’t sense obstacles in time for the cars to stop. So, right now, I wouldn’t feel safe using one. Also, in order for me to use such a vehicle, it would need to be equipped with text-to—speech technology and buttons labeled in braille, similar to accessible voting machines, or the option to control the vehicle with my voice.

 

Tell us about your dream car.

 

Because I don’t see well enough, my dream car would drive itself. I could just tell it to take me to a specific location or address. It would be electric but it could have an engine similar to a regular car, unlike other such models, so blind and visually impaired pedestrians could hear it coming. Sensors could ensure the car is in the appropriate lane and stop the car in time if an obstacle is spotted. Also, stop lights could be detected. When I get home, it could just drive into my garage and onto a docking station, where it would charge and be ready for me the next time I need it.

 

Tell us about the worst car you ever owned. What made it so bad?

 

Because I can’t drive, I’ve never owned a car. But several years after we moved to Sheridan, when I was in high school, my mother acquired a Fiat. I don’t remember if it was new or used, but there seemed to be one thing after another that went wrong with it. At one point, Mother proclaimed it a piece of junk. My younger brother said he’d heard somewhere that Fiat was an acronym standing for “found in a toilet.”

 

Bonus: Tell us about your most memorable sexual experience in a car.

 

I’ve never had any sexual experiences in a car. But in my latest novel, my main character, after dancing with the boy of her dreams during her senior prom, catches him in the act with her best friend in the back seat of his car. Want to know more? Read The Red Dress.

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Now, it’s your turn. You can answer these questions in the comment field below or click here to learn how to participate in TMI Tuesday on your own blog.

By the way, for those of you who use the National Library Services for the Blind and Print Disabled, The Red Dress is available for download from their site here. No matter how you read it, please be sure to review it wherever you can. That goes for all my books. Thank you for stopping by. Stay safe, happy, and healthy.

New! The Red Dress

Copyright July 2019 by DLD Books

Front cover contains: young, dark-haired woman in red dress holding flowers

When Eve went to her high school senior prom, she wore a red dress that her mother had made for her. That night, after dancing with the boy of her dreams, she caught him in the act with her best friend. Months later, Eve, a freshman in college, is bullied into giving the dress to her roommate. After her mother finds out, their relationship is never the same again.

Twenty-five years later, Eve, a bestselling author, is happily married with three children. Although her mother suffers from dementia, she still remembers, and Eve still harbors the guilt for giving the dress away. When she receives a Facebook friend request from her old college roommate and an invitation to her twenty-five-year high school class reunion, then meets her former best friend by chance, she must confront the past in order to face the future.

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Image contains: Abbie, smiling.

Author: abbiejohnsontaylor

I'm the author of two novels,, two poetry collections, and a memoir with another novel on the way. My work has appeared in various journals and anthologies. I'm visually impaired and live in Sheridan, Wyoming, where for six years, I cared for my totally blind late husband who was paralyzed by two strokes. Please visit my website at http://www.abbiejohnsontaylor.com.

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