Laughter, The Best Medicine #Wednesday Words, #Poetry

I like interjecting humor in my writing once in a while. I sometimes laugh at my own writing if I’ve made a typographical error that could be interpreted the wrong way. At other times, my writing has made people laugh when it hadn’t seemed funny.

Years ago, I was attending a poetry workshop with my friend Rose, with whom I’ve attended many such writing activities. In the morning, we were doing a writing exercise. Rose was seated next to me, and we were writing along, minding our own business, when suddenly, she let loose with a loud belch, followed by a cry of embarrassment.

Poor Rose, she’s a grandmother and a Methodist, not usually given to loud expulsions of wind. It was all I could do to keep from laughing. I somehow managed to get myself under control and finish the exercise. Later, during a break, Rose said that during that time, I’d looked like I was in pain, and she asked if I was all right. I told her I was.

That afternoon, the workshop presenter prompted us to write about something unusual or extraordinary. I jumped at the chance to write the following poem. I then shared it with the group, much to the delight of everyone, including Rose.

Now, in meetings of my local poetry group, some of whom attended that workshop, when anyone auditorily exhibits a bodily function, someone usually says, “Oh, Abbie, I’ll bet you’ll write a poem about that, won’t you?” Well, I tried writing a poem about an unusual-sounding hiccup but didn’t get very far.

Anyway, this poem appears in my collection, How to Build a Better Mousetrap: Recollections and Reflections of a Family Caregiver. You can click the Play button below to hear me read it.

Belch!

 

The room is silent
but for the scratch of pencil against paper,
murmur of voices,
flip, rip of pages.
Unexpected, it cuts through the silence,
raucous, obnoxious,
breaks my concentration.
I fight to diffuse a bomb of mirth
that threatens to explode.
The effort brings tears to my eyes.
After a moment, I continue writing,
but my heart’s not in it anymore.

Thanks to fellow blogger Stevie Turner for inspiring the above post. If you’d like to participate in her blog hop on the subject of humor in writing, click here.

By the way, for those of you who use the National Library Services for the Blind and Print Disabled, The Red Dress is available for download from their site here. No matter how you read it, please be sure to review it wherever you can. That goes for all my books. Thank you for stopping by. Stay safe, happy, and healthy.

New! The Red Dress

Copyright July 2019 by DLD Books

Front cover contains: young, dark-haired woman in red dress holding flowers

When Eve went to her high school senior prom, she wore a red dress that her mother had made for her. That night, after dancing with the boy of her dreams, she caught him in the act with her best friend. Months later, Eve, a freshman in college, is bullied into giving the dress to her roommate. After her mother finds out, their relationship is never the same again.

Twenty-five years later, Eve, a bestselling author, is happily married with three children. Although her mother suffers from dementia, she still remembers, and Eve still harbors the guilt for giving the dress away. When she receives a Facebook friend request from her old college roommate and an invitation to her twenty-five-year high school class reunion, then meets her former best friend by chance, she must confront the past in order to face the future.

***

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Image contains: Abbie, smiling.

All About Transportation #TMI Tuesday

Why don’t you take a ride with me this week, as I answer these questions about cars? Then, be sure to click on the link below my answers to learn how you can participate in this weekly blog feature.

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What car do you remember your parents owning when you were a child? Do you have any special memories attached to it?

 

When I was eight or nine, growing up during the 1960;’s in Tucson, Arizona, my parents owned two white Mercedes Benz, which they affectionately named. Mother drove 220S Baby, the interior of which, including the seats, was white. Dad drove Buddy, with its dark interior and seats of a dark print color. 220S Baby had air conditioning, necessary during those hot Arizona summers, while Buddy did not. These cars stuck with us until after we moved here to Sheridan, Wyoming, in 1973.

 

How important are cars to you? Could you live without one?

 

If everything was within walking distance, and we didn’t have snow or ice, I could do without a car. I can’t drive one, anyway, because of my visual impairment. But I have two strong legs, and I love to walk. When I need to go somewhere too far to walk, or the weather’s bad, I rely on someone to drive me.

 

In April 2019, Elon Musk predicted that owners of autonomous cars acting as taxis would be able to earn up to $30000 from their vehicle while they weren’t using it. What do you think? The link for the source article is here.

 

If these vehicles could be made safe, I would have no problem with them. As it is now, I’ve heard of accidents happening because the computers didn’t sense obstacles in time for the cars to stop. So, right now, I wouldn’t feel safe using one. Also, in order for me to use such a vehicle, it would need to be equipped with text-to—speech technology and buttons labeled in braille, similar to accessible voting machines, or the option to control the vehicle with my voice.

 

Tell us about your dream car.

 

Because I don’t see well enough, my dream car would drive itself. I could just tell it to take me to a specific location or address. It would be electric but it could have an engine similar to a regular car, unlike other such models, so blind and visually impaired pedestrians could hear it coming. Sensors could ensure the car is in the appropriate lane and stop the car in time if an obstacle is spotted. Also, stop lights could be detected. When I get home, it could just drive into my garage and onto a docking station, where it would charge and be ready for me the next time I need it.

 

Tell us about the worst car you ever owned. What made it so bad?

 

Because I can’t drive, I’ve never owned a car. But several years after we moved to Sheridan, when I was in high school, my mother acquired a Fiat. I don’t remember if it was new or used, but there seemed to be one thing after another that went wrong with it. At one point, Mother proclaimed it a piece of junk. My younger brother said he’d heard somewhere that Fiat was an acronym standing for “found in a toilet.”

 

Bonus: Tell us about your most memorable sexual experience in a car.

 

I’ve never had any sexual experiences in a car. But in my latest novel, my main character, after dancing with the boy of her dreams during her senior prom, catches him in the act with her best friend in the back seat of his car. Want to know more? Read The Red Dress.

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Now, it’s your turn. You can answer these questions in the comment field below or click here to learn how to participate in TMI Tuesday on your own blog.

By the way, for those of you who use the National Library Services for the Blind and Print Disabled, The Red Dress is available for download from their site here. No matter how you read it, please be sure to review it wherever you can. That goes for all my books. Thank you for stopping by. Stay safe, happy, and healthy.

New! The Red Dress

Copyright July 2019 by DLD Books

Front cover contains: young, dark-haired woman in red dress holding flowers

When Eve went to her high school senior prom, she wore a red dress that her mother had made for her. That night, after dancing with the boy of her dreams, she caught him in the act with her best friend. Months later, Eve, a freshman in college, is bullied into giving the dress to her roommate. After her mother finds out, their relationship is never the same again.

Twenty-five years later, Eve, a bestselling author, is happily married with three children. Although her mother suffers from dementia, she still remembers, and Eve still harbors the guilt for giving the dress away. When she receives a Facebook friend request from her old college roommate and an invitation to her twenty-five-year high school class reunion, then meets her former best friend by chance, she must confront the past in order to face the future.

***

My Books

My Amazon Author Page

Facebook

Website

 

Image contains: Abbie, smiling.

Both Sides, Now #Musical Monday

The song I’m singing today was on one of the first eight-track cartridges I had when I was eight years old. It comes from Judy Collins’ 1967 album, Wild Flowers, which has other songs I enjoyed such as “Since You Asked” and “Hey, That’s No Way to Say Goodbye.” At such a young age, I couldn’t understand these songs, but I appreciated their soothing melodies and rich harmonies.

According to Wikipedia, “Both Sides, Now” was written by Joni Mitchell and included on her album, Clouds in 1969. The title comes from a lyric from the song. It has since been recorded by such artists as Frank Sinatra and Willie Nelson. Joni Mitchell re-recorded the song with an orchestral arrangement for her album, Both Sides Now in 2000. I hope you enjoy my rendition, based on the Judy Collins version.

By the way, for those of you who use the National Library Services for the Blind and Print Disabled, The Red Dress is available for download from their site here. No matter how you read it, please be sure to review it wherever you can. That goes for all my books. Thank you for stopping by. Stay safe, happy, and healthy.

New! The Red Dress

Copyright July 2019 by DLD Books

Front cover contains: young, dark-haired woman in red dress holding flowers

When Eve went to her high school senior prom, she wore a red dress that her mother had made for her. That night, after dancing with the boy of her dreams, she caught him in the act with her best friend. Months later, Eve, a freshman in college, is bullied into giving the dress to her roommate. After her mother finds out, their relationship is never the same again.

Twenty-five years later, Eve, a bestselling author, is happily married with three children. Although her mother suffers from dementia, she still remembers, and Eve still harbors the guilt for giving the dress away. When she receives a Facebook friend request from her old college roommate and an invitation to her twenty-five-year high school class reunion, then meets her former best friend by chance, she must confront the past in order to face the future.

***

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My Amazon Author Page

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Website Image contains: Abbie, smiling.

 

 

About Joan Myles #Sharing Sunday

Thanks to fellow blogger Joan Myles for coming up with a neat idea. If people who follow her blog share her bio on their blogs, she’ll share theirs on her blog. So, I’m following suit. If you share my bio, I’ll share yours.

Sharing my bio is easy. Click here, or find the link at the top that says, “About Me.” Then, you can simply include a link to this page by using one of the sharing options below the bio or copying the URL from your browser’s address bar. You can also share my bio on social media by using one of those sharing options. So, let’s all share each other’s bios and learn more about one another.

As for Joan Myles, she’s the author of two poetry books and the mother of four children. You’ll find my review of her first collection, One with Willows, here. I plan to read and review her book that just came out, One Glittering Wing. I hope that after reading her bio, you’ll check out the rest of her blog and buy her books. Happy reading!

 

Via About Joan Myles

 

By the way, for those of you who use the National Library Services for the Blind and Print Disabled, The Red Dress is available for download from their site here. No matter how you read it, please be sure to review it wherever you can. That goes for all my books. Thank you for stopping by. Stay safe, happy, and healthy.

New! The Red Dress

Copyright July 2019 by DLD Books

Front cover contains: young, dark-haired woman in red dress holding flowers

When Eve went to her high school senior prom, she wore a red dress that her mother had made for her. That night, after dancing with the boy of her dreams, she caught him in the act with her best friend. Months later, Eve, a freshman in college, is bullied into giving the dress to her roommate. After her mother finds out, their relationship is never the same again.

Twenty-five years later, Eve, a bestselling author, is happily married with three children. Although her mother suffers from dementia, she still remembers, and Eve still harbors the guilt for giving the dress away. When she receives a Facebook friend request from her old college roommate and an invitation to her twenty-five-year high school class reunion, then meets her former best friend by chance, she must confront the past in order to face the future.

***

My Books

My Amazon Author Page

Facebook

Website     Image contains: Abbie, smiling.