Poetry Collection Reflects Natural World #Thursday Book Feature #fridayFun Reads #Inspiration

A photo of Abbie smiling in front of a white background. Her brown hair is cut short and frames her face. She is wearing a bright red shirt and a dark, flowy scarf swirled with hues of purple, pinks and blues.

In case you’re wondering if I don’t know what day it is, if perhaps the grandmother with dimentia in my latest novel rubbed off on me, please rest assured I know it’s Friday. Today, I’m pleased to share a book review I posted three years ago. Lynda McKinney Lambert’s book, Star Signs is now available in recorded audio formats from the National Library Service for the Blind and Print Disabled and Audible. So, it’s worth a second look. Enjoy!

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The poems in this author’s third book touch on music, travel, and other topics and express a wide range of emotions. They appear in various forms. One even reads like a letter. Notes following some poems explain what inspired them and provide background information.

 

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Starting the Day #SixSentenceStoryThursdayLinkUp #Excertps #Inspiration

A photo of Abbie smiling in front of a white background. Her brown hair is cut short and frames her face. She is wearing a bright red shirt and a dark, flowy scarf swirled with hues of purple, pinks and blues.

Welcome to another edition of Six-Sentence Story Thursday Link Up, where the given word this week is “coffee.” I found the perfect six-sentence excerpt from my novel, Why Grandma Doesn’t Know Me, which can be downloaded from Smashwords for free this month. See below for details.

In this scene, told from Marti’s point of view, the Vincent family starts their day with Marti waking her teen-aged daughter for school. Like any teenager, Natalie expresses resignation with her use of the word “whatever.” We open with Marti’s reaction to this.

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As she pulled herself into a sitting position on the side of the bed with a groan, I was tempted to chastise her, as I usually did, for her inappropriate use of the word “whatever.” But again, I needed to pick my battles. Instead, I said, “See you downstairs.”

In the kitchen, while Sarah continued to eat, I started making toast for the rest of us. Cold cereal, fruit, and orange juice were already on the kitchen table. That, along with the coffee Daryl and I drank, was our usual breakfast on weekdays unless I was inspired to fix oatmeal, which wasn’t often.

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So, does Natalie get out of bed or go back to sleep? What happens at the breakfast table? To find out, you’ll need to read the book.

Thanks to Girlie on the Edge for inspiring me to post the above novel excerpt with her six-sentence story prompt for this week. You can participate in this week’s hop and read other bloggers’ six-sentence creations by clicking here.

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If you haven’t already done so, please subscribe to my email list to receive my twice-yearly newsletter and other announcements that may not be posted here. This is a one-way announcements list, meaning the only messages you’ll receive from this list will come only from me. So, you can rest assured that this list is low-traffic. Send a blank email to:  newsfrommycorner+subscribe@groups.io  You’ll receive a confirmation email. Reply to that with another blank message, and you should be good to go.

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And now, I’m pleased to announce that until the end of the month, all my books on Smashwords can be downloaded ABSOLUTELY FREE as part of the Smashwords  summer/winter sale. You can visit my Smashwords author page here to download these books. Happy reading!

 

New! Why Grandma Doesn’t Know Me

Copyright 2021 by Abbie Johnson Taylor.

Independently published with the help of DLD Books.

The cover of the book features an older woman sitting in a wicker chair facing a window. The world beyond the window is bright, and several plants are visible on the terrace. Behind the woman’s chair is another plant, with a tall stalk and wide rounded leaves. The woman has short, white hair, glasses, a red sweater, and tan pants. The border of the picture is a taupe color and reads "Why Grandma Doesn't Know Me" above the photo and "Abbie Johnson Taylor" below it.

Sixteen-year-old Natalie’s grandmother, suffering from dementia and confined to a wheelchair, lives in a nursing home and rarely recognizes Natalie. But one Halloween night, she tells her a shocking secret that only she and Natalie’s mother know. Natalie is the product of a one-night stand between her mother, who is a college English teacher, and another professor.

After some research, Natalie learns that people with dementia often have vivid memories of past events. Still not wanting to believe what her grandmother has told her, she finds her biological father online. The resemblance between them is undeniable. Not knowing what else to do, she shows his photo and website to her parents.

Natalie realizes she has some growing up to do. Scared and confused, she reaches out to her biological father, and they start corresponding.

Her younger sister, Sarah, senses their parents’ marital difficulties. At Thanksgiving, when she has an opportunity to see Santa Claus, she asks him to bring them together again. Can the jolly old elf grant her request?

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The Evergreen Journal #21 ~ Full Siren #WordPressWednesday #Reblogs #Inspiration

A photo of Abbie smiling in front of a white background. Her brown hair is cut short and frames her face. She is wearing a bright red shirt and a dark, flowy scarf swirled with hues of purple, pinks and blues.

If you’ve never ridden in an ambulance, you might think it fun to careen through city streets, strapped to a gurney, siren blaring. Several years ago, when fellow author Lynda McKinney Lambert needed an ambulance, she realized she didn’t want to ride that way. Here she is to tell you all about her experience in the post I’m sharing today. This piece was published in the current issue of The Writer’s Grapevine, which can be read here. Enjoy!

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In the late afternoon, Bob drove our car to our local mechanic’s garage. I saw this as an opportunity to go outside and do some yard work. I decided to cut down some volunteer trees and plants that were overgrown. The wild vegetation is out of control, I thought. I was on a mission to get this done before Bob arrived home.

 

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News from My Corner Summer 2022 #TuesdayTidbit #Newsletters #Inspiration

A photo of Abbie smiling in front of a white background. Her brown hair is cut short and frames her face. She is wearing a bright red shirt and a dark, flowy scarf swirled with hues of purple, pinks and blues.

News from My Corner

Summer, 2022

 

As I write this at about three in the afternoon on July 14th, it’s hot. We got up to a hundred earlier today, but now, it’s down to 96 degrees. I’m thankful for the window air conditioner and ceiling fans that keep my house relatively cool.

So far, this year has been pretty busy. In January, I was interviewed on the In Perspective podcast, where hosts Bob Branco and Peter Altschul talk to writers and other persons of interest on Zoom in front of an audience. After Bob and Peter talked to me about my work, the floor was opened for questions, and we had a fun discussion.

In February, Behind Our Eyes, a writers’ organization to which I belong, held a book launch for me. Fellow author Carol Farnsworth interviewed me about my work and other things in front of another audience on Zoom. Afterward, there was more lively discussion.

At the end of February, I performed at the First Congregational Church here in Sheridan as part of a monthly music series they call Last Friday at First. Accompanying myself on the piano, I sang for about twenty minutes. At the end of March, my singing group, Just Harmony, also performed there.

In April, I participated in a variety of events to commemorate National Poetry Month on Zoom through Behind Our Eyes and other organizations. At the end of the month, I attended the WyoPoets annual workshop, which was held this year in Douglas, Wyoming, about a six-hour drive south of Sheridan. As always, I renewed acquaintances with other poets across the state, made new friends, and wrote a poem.

In May and June, I took an online class in memoir-writing. It met on Zoom and was taught by Glenda Beall, a fellow blogger I’ve known for years. I took a similar class last fall and enjoyed writing short creative nonfiction pieces that have been published. This class was no different, and I enjoyed it.

In June, I attended the Wyoming Writers Conference, which, to my delight, was held this year here in Sheridan at the local college. Craig Johnson, author of the Longmire series, who lives in Ucross, Wyoming, about twenty miles east of Sheridan, was the keynote speaker at the Saturday night banquet. He also did a question and answer session earlier that day. Although I’m not a fan of his books, I always enjoy hearing from local authors, and Craig Johnson’s presentations didn’t disappoint me.

Also in June, Just Harmony sang at a memorial service for Lou, one of our members who passed away last year after a lengthy battle with cancer. We joined forces with Patchwork, another local group to which many of us belonged and from which we separated to form our own group several years ago. Despite bad feelings between people in both groups, we put aside our differences to give Lou the best send-off we possibly could.

I also performed on my own in June, playing the piano and singing in our local senior center’s dining room as part of its Lunchtime Livestream program. The event was broadcast on Facebook. My performance went well, and afterward, I got a free meal. Talk about singing for your supper and getting breakfast. Well, it was lunch. I’ll be doing a similar performance this month at the First Congregational Church as part of its last Friday concert series.

As usual, I’ve been performing regularly twice a month at a nursing home on the last Tuesday and an assisted living facility on the second Friday with occasional gigs at our local senior center’s adult day care program. But several times in the past few months, I was exposed to COVID and felt compelled to cancel performances  in order to keep people safe. The good news is I never got sick, and I’m now fully vaccinated.

Well, as they say, “That’s all she wrote.” I hope you have a safe and enjoyable summer.

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If you haven’t already done so, please subscribe to my email list to receive my twice-yearly newsletter and other announcements that may not be posted here. This is a one-way announcements list, meaning the only messages you’ll receive from this list will come only from me. So, you can rest assured that this list is low-traffic. Send a blank email to:  newsfrommycorner+subscribe@groups.io  You’ll receive a confirmation email. Reply to that with another blank message, and you should be good to go.

***

And now, I’m pleased to announce that until the end of the month, all my books on Smashwords can be downloaded ABSOLUTELY FREE as part of the Smashwords  summer/winter sale. You can visit my Smashwords author page here to download these books. Happy reading!

 

New! Why Grandma Doesn’t Know Me

Copyright 2021 by Abbie Johnson Taylor.

Independently published with the help of DLD Books.

The cover of the book features an older woman sitting in a wicker chair facing a window. The world beyond the window is bright, and several plants are visible on the terrace. Behind the woman’s chair is another plant, with a tall stalk and wide rounded leaves. The woman has short, white hair, glasses, a red sweater, and tan pants. The border of the picture is a taupe color and reads "Why Grandma Doesn't Know Me" above the photo and "Abbie Johnson Taylor" below it.

Sixteen-year-old Natalie’s grandmother, suffering from dementia and confined to a wheelchair, lives in a nursing home and rarely recognizes Natalie. But one Halloween night, she tells her a shocking secret that only she and Natalie’s mother know. Natalie is the product of a one-night stand between her mother, who is a college English teacher, and another professor.

After some research, Natalie learns that people with dementia often have vivid memories of past events. Still not wanting to believe what her grandmother has told her, she finds her biological father online. The resemblance between them is undeniable. Not knowing what else to do, she shows his photo and website to her parents.

Natalie realizes she has some growing up to do. Scared and confused, she reaches out to her biological father, and they start corresponding.

Her younger sister, Sarah, senses their parents’ marital difficulties. At Thanksgiving, when she has an opportunity to see Santa Claus, she asks him to bring them together again. Can the jolly old elf grant her request?

***

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Website

 

 

THE WRITER’S GRAPEVINE MIDSUMMER JUNE JULY EDITION #SocialMediaMonday #Reblogs #Inspiration

A photo of Abbie smiling in front of a white background. Her brown hair is cut short and frames her face. She is wearing a bright red shirt and a dark, flowy scarf swirled with hues of purple, pinks and blues.

I’m pleased to announce that a few of my works have been published in the magazine I’m sharing today. You may also find stories, poems, articles, and more from others you know. So, as Patty says, “grab your favorite drink, snuggle down into your most comfortable reading nest, and ready yourself for some great discoveries.”

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Hello everyone, and welcome to another incredible edition of the Writer’s Grapevine.

How do I know it’s incredible? Because it’s filled with “incredible” contributors. But the proof is, as they say, “in the pudding.” Or, in this case, on the page. So grab your favorite drink, snuggle down into your most comfortable reading nest, and ready yourself for some great discoveries.

 

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