Saturday Song: Light My Fire by The Doors

In honor of National Fire Prevention Week, here’s a song about a type of fire some of us might not want to prevent. I’d be lying if I said I liked the analogy between sex and fire, but this song was pretty popular when I was growing up. Enjoy the blast from the past, and have a great Saturday.

 

Author Abbie Johnson Taylor

We Shall Overcome

How to Build a Better Mousetrap: Recollections and Reflections of a Family Caregiver

That’s Life: New and Selected Poems

My Ideal Partner: How I Met, Married, and Cared for the Man I Loved Despite Debilitating Odds

Click to hear an audio trailer.

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Saturday Song: Me and Bobby McGee by Gordon Lightfoot

Janis Joplin also made this song popular, but I like Gordon Lightfoot’s version better. In 1970, I had one of his albums on an eight-track tape, which I listened to frequently and which included this song. Enjoy, and have a great Saturday.

 

Author Abbie Johnson Taylor

We Shall Overcome

How to Build a Better Mousetrap: Recollections and Reflections of a Family Caregiver

That’s Life: New and Selected Poems

My Ideal Partner: How I Met, Married, and Cared for the Man I Loved Despite Debilitating Odds

Click to hear an audio trailer.

Like me on Facebook.

 

 

Thursday Book Feature: The Right Time

The Right Time

By Danielle Steel

Copyright 2017.

 

At the age of seven, Alexandra is abandoned by her mother and finds comfort in reading books with her father, a Boston contractor. They start with Nancy Drew mysteries and work their way to Agatha Christie and beyond. After her mother dies in a car accident when she’s nine, Alex begins writing her own crime stories, much to a teacher’s consternation.

When she is fourteen, her father dies after a long bout with Alzheimer’s. An orphan with no other relatives, she ends up in a convent where nuns encourage her to send her stories to mystery magazines, where they’re published. In high school, she gets her first novel idea, and by the time she’s nineteen, she has found an agent and published her first book. Because her father has told her that many people don’t read murder mysteries published by women, she writes under the name of Alexander Green.

Her career takes off after the publication of her first book, and by the time she graduates from Boston College, she has published more books. She travels through Europe and lives in London for a couple of years before returning to the states. All this time, she’s leading a double life, struggling to keep the identity of Alexander Green a secret, as her books gain more popularity. This isolates her and leaves her vulnerable to arrogance and envy of others. Then, she gets a movie deal in Hollywood with one of her books, and after that, another book is made into a television series in London. There, she finds romance at the right time.

One thing I found disconcerting about this book is that no dates are mentioned. At one point during Alex’s childhood, there’s a reference to the book, The Silence of the Lambs. A search of Wikipedia told me this book came out in 1988, but that doesn’t give a clear indication of exactly when the action takes place. Since the book spans close to forty years, dates to orient the reader would have been helpful.

I also don’t like the author’s portrayal of writing classes and conferences. Not all classes are taught by lazy teaching assistants who are jealous of other writers, and not many writers’ conferences are venues for drinking and sex. As a writer myself, I found such activities helpful.

However, I like Danielle Steel’s portrayal of the nuns in the convent where Alex lives after her father dies. This is not an orphanage but a community center of sorts. The nuns are either teachers or nurses, and when they’re not working, they’re teaching classes in art, health, and other subjects to community members. You’d think nuns would turn up their noses at crime fiction but not these sisters, who support Alex in her writing endeavors.

I downloaded this book from Audible and enjoyed the narrator’s portrayal of all characters. I was with Alex when her books became bestsellers and wished a publisher would pay me three million dollars for a book. As the author points out though, it’s not about the money. It’s about sharing your talent with the world.

 

Author Abbie Johnson Taylor

We Shall Overcome

How to Build a Better Mousetrap: Recollections and Reflections of a Family Caregiver

That’s Life: New and Selected Poems

My Ideal Partner: How I Met, Married, and Cared for the Man I Loved Despite Debilitating Odds

Click to hear an audio trailer.

Like me on Facebook.

 

 

Saturday Song: Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band/With A Little Help From My Friends

Fifty years ago on June 1st, the album was first released. When I was about six or seven, my parents bought a copy. I enjoyed listening to it, although I couldn’t understand most of the songs, and a few of them seemed wild to me. Ten years later when my brother got his first drum set, he played along with the record. Today, I still have the album on CD and am listening to it, as I write this. I searched in vain on YouTube for the original title track, but the closest thing I found was this. Enjoy, and have a great Saturday.

 

Author Abbie Johnson Taylor

We Shall Overcome

How to Build a Better Mousetrap: Recollections and Reflections of a Family Caregiver

That’s Life: New and Selected Poems

My Ideal Partner: How I Met, Married, and Cared for the Man I Loved Despite Debilitating Odds

Click to hear an audio trailer.

Like me on Facebook.

 

Song Saturday: Let It Be by The Beatles

This is a new feature I’m trying, and thanks to Sharon E. Cathcart for giving me the idea. Each Saturday, I’ll feature a song I like and a thought or memory associated with it.

It’s so frustrating to hear of all the events that are going on in the world. However, there’s nothing we can do about it except “Let It Be.”

 

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Author Abbie Johnson Taylor

We Shall Overcome

How to Build a Better Mousetrap: Recollections and Reflections of a Family Caregiver

That’s Life: New and Selected Poems

My Ideal Partner: How I Met, Married, and Cared for the Man I Loved Despite Debilitating Odds

Click to hear an audio trailer.

Like me on Facebook.

 

Letters to Celebrities

Abbie-1

One blogger I follow posts letters to Ellen DeGeneres simply because she can. In this post, she explains to Ellen why she thinks rotary phones should still exist. I must admit she makes some good points, although I really love my cell phone.

One of my favorite comedians is Alan Alda, who played Hawkeye on MASH. If I were to write letters to him on my blog, would A. Marie Silver, Ellen DeGeneres’s pen pal, sue me for plagiarism? When I was in college, I once took a basic research writing class in which the instructor was fond of saying, “Plagiarism is a crime.”

I pictured myself calling home from a police station in Billings, Montana, where I was attending MSU. “Hi Mother, Dad, I’m in jail for plagiarism. Could you drive the 150 or so miles from Wyoming and bail me out, please? Maybe you could ask Uncle Tony in Colorado Springs to come. He’s a pretty good lawyer, isn’t he? Maybe Aunt Lynn and the girls could also come, and after I’m free, we could all go skiing at Red Lodge like we did in Breckenridge when I was in high school, remember?”

Needless to say, it was with trepidation that I wrote my final paper, paraphrasing the heck out of every source I quoted. The topic was schizophrenia. Believe me, I had one of the symptoms of this psychological disorder, paranoia.

It didn’t help when another student said the instructor accused her of plagiarism after she turned in her paper. I expected armed policemen to march into the classroom at any minute and haul her off in handcuffs. Miracle of miracles, when I turned in my paper, the instructor did not accuse me of plagiarism and did give me a passing grade.

Now, my parents are gone. Uncle Tony is semi-retired, and his health isn’t what it used to be. If Alan Alda were a lawyer, he could march into a courtroom cracking jokes, like he did in the operating room in Korea years ago, but he’s not a lawyer. He’s not even a doctor. He’s a comedian and can’t help me if I’m sued for writing letters to him on my blog. I’m not sure it’s worth the risk. What do you think?

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Author Abbie Johnson Taylor

We Shall Overcome

How to Build a Better Mousetrap: Recollections and Reflections of a Family Caregiver

That’s Life: New and Selected Poems

My Ideal Partner: How I Met, Married, and Cared for the Man I Loved Despite Debilitating Odds

Click to hear an audio trailer.

Like me on Facebook.

 

Poem Speaks Out Against Trump

Abbie-1

I usually don’t get political here, but when someone in my Third Thursday Poets group suggested we each write a poem about the meaning of January 20th for critique at our last session, I couldn’t resist. Click on the title below to hear me read what I wrote. You’re welcome to comment, whether you agree or not, but if you don’t like what you read or hear, I hope we can simply agree to disagree.

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INAUGURATION DAY

 

 

Today, our country turns over a new leaf.

A different leader takes the Oath of Office.

A billionaire, racist, bigot

with no grasp of foreign policy,

little respect for women or minorities

or concern for impoverished Americans,

the economy, environment,

he won the Presidency, not by popular vote

in an election possibly rigged by Russians.

What will become of America?

***

Author Abbie Johnson Taylor

We Shall Overcome

How to Build a Better Mousetrap: Recollections and Reflections of a Family Caregiver

That’s Life: New and Selected Poems

My Ideal Partner: How I Met, Married, and Cared for the Man I Loved Despite Debilitating Odds

Click to hear an audio trailer.

Like me on Facebook.