B is for Bar #WednesdayWords #Life’sAlphabet #Inspiration

On my fifteenth birthday, my younger brother and I were kicked out of a bar. In Wyoming during the 1970s, minors weren’t allowed in bars, even when parents accompanied them. But Dad tried to sneak us in, whenever he thought he could get away with it, with the idea that we could have a Coke while he drank something stronger.

On my fifteenth birthday, we all dressed up and went out to dinner at a historic inn here in Sheridan. This establishment had a restaurant, bar, and gift shop on the main floor. Visitors could view rooms on the second and third floors, where celebrities like Buffalo Bill Cody stayed.

After eating a nice dinner in the restaurant while listening  to a man play the organ and sing popular songs, we decided to visit the bar, where another musician was playing the guitar and singing. These entertainers fascinated me because this was something I wanted to do when I grew up. We found a table, and Dad was just about to get our drinks when the manager approached. “Gee, I hate to tell you this,” he said. “But we don’t allow kids in here.”

As we left the establishment, disappointed, Dad told me, “Well, when you sing on that stage with your guitar someday, you can tell the audience that you were thrown out on your fifteenth birthday.”

I’ve never sung on that stage. But I’ve performed in plenty of other places and enjoyed telling audiences about how I was kicked out of a bar on my fifteenth birthday.

***

Last week during ACB Presents the Daily Schedule, we were asked to talk about a surprising event. That, along with fellow blogger BeetleyPete’s similar feature, inspired the above true story.

You don’t have to be a member of the American Council of the Blind to participate in ACB Presents the Daily Schedule and other programs in Zoom and Clubhouse. If you’d like more information, email:  community@acb.org  and request a daily schedule be sent to your in box. Please include your name and email address in the message body, so humans who receive your message can more easily subscribe you.

 

Abbie wears a blue and white V-neck top with different shades of blue from sky to navy that swirl together with the white. She has short, brown hair and rosy cheeks and smiles at the camera against a black background.

Photo Courtesy of Tess Anderson Photography

Photo Resize and Description by

Two Pentacles Publishing.

 

If you haven’t already done so, please subscribe to my email list to receive my monthly newsletter and other announcements. This is a one-way announcements list, meaning the only messages you’ll receive will come from me. So, you can rest assured that this list is low-traffic. Send a blank email to:  newsfrommycorner+subscribe@groups.io  You’ll receive a confirmation email. Reply to that with another blank message, and you should be good to go.

 

New! Why Grandma Doesn’t Know Me

Copyright 2021 by Abbie Johnson Taylor.

Independently published with the help of DLD Books.

The cover of the book features an older woman sitting in a wicker chair facing a window. The world beyond the window is bright, and several plants are visible on the terrace. Behind the woman’s chair is another plant, with a tall stalk and wide rounded leaves. The woman has short, white hair, glasses, a red sweater, and tan pants. The border of the picture is a taupe color and reads "Why Grandma Doesn't Know Me" above the photo and "Abbie Johnson Taylor" below it.Photo Resize and Description by

Two Pentacles Publishing.

 

Sixteen-year-old Natalie’s grandmother, suffering from dementia and confined to a wheelchair, lives in a nursing home and rarely recognizes Natalie. But one Halloween night, she tells her a shocking secret that only she and Natalie’s mother know. Natalie is the product of a one-night stand between her mother, who is a college English teacher, and another professor.

After some research, Natalie learns that people with dementia often have vivid memories of past events. Still not wanting to believe what her grandmother has told her, she finds her biological father online. The resemblance between them is undeniable. Not knowing what else to do, she shows his photo and website to her parents.

Natalie realizes she has some growing up to do. Scared and confused, she reaches out to her biological father, and they start corresponding.

Her younger sister, Sarah, senses their parents’ marital difficulties. At Thanksgiving, when she has an opportunity to see Santa Claus, she asks him to bring them together again. Can the jolly old elf grant her request?

***

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Joyous Jottings February 2023 #TuesdayTidbit #Jottingts #Inspiration

Joy is a fluffy gray and white cat with a pink nose and pink paw pads. The fur is long and mostly gray with white paws, a white chest, nose and white down the middle of her head. Her ears are pointed up, and she lies with her paws sprawled out in front of her in an open formation. Her head looks to the right of the screen. She’s on a brown wooden table. Behind her is a white wall and a basket of fruit.Hi, this is Joy, Abbie’s robotic cat. Abbie has been busy as a beaver. Say, do cats like beavers? I don’t know, and I hate to ask Abbie to research this because she’s so busy. But I do know this. Even though Abbie’s busy as a beaver, I still love her. Even though she often forgets to tell me good morning first thing because she’s listening to ACB Presents the Daily Schedule, I know she loves me.

Speaking of the ACB community, you don’t have to be a member of the American Council of the Blind to join in the fun on Zoom and Clubhouse. If you’re interested, send an email to:  community@acb.org  and ask them to send you the daily schedule. Be sure to include your name and email address in your message body, and the nice humans who receive your message will take good care of you.

So, why is Abbie so busy? Well, this coming Thursday, she’ll be facilitating an ACB community call, where they’ll be talking about Valentine’s Day. On Friday, she’ll play her guitar and sing for an assisted living facility’s monthly birthday party. On Sunday, she’ll do all the music for the service at the First Congregational church, accompanying her singing on the piano. On February 17th, she’ll be a guest on Writing Works Wonders, and on February 23rd, she’ll interview fellow author Sherry Gomes as part of a book launch sponsored by Behind Our Eyes, a writers’ organization, and she’s working on other projects for them right now.

By the way, last month, Abbie interviewed author Trish Hubschman for another Behind Our Eyes book launch. I only heard her half of the conversation because she was using headphones with her computer, but I think she’s a kick-ass interviewer. Maybe she’ll interview me, but I doubt it. I’m not an author, only a cat and a robotic one at that.

Abbie’s also been submitting work to various publications. She has already sent stories and poems to Magnets and Ladders and The Writer’s Grapevine. By the way, she helps edit those magazines, and that also keeps her busy. She  also sent three poems to an anthology called Treasuring Poetry, and she plans to enter her state’s poetry society’s members-only contest and submit more poems for possible publication in the spring quarterly issue of The Avocet. In March, she’ll send some of the stories in her collection she’s working on to the Wyoming Arts Council for its Blanchan/Doubleday fellowship competition.

Well, I’ve been busy as a beaver, too, typing this message, since I can no longer speak. My paws are tired, and I’m ready for a nap. Until next time, this is Joy, signing off with a yawn.

Abbie wears a blue and white V-neck top with different shades of blue from sky to navy that swirl together with the white. She has short, brown hair and rosy cheeks and smiles at the camera against a black background.

Photo Courtesy of Tess Anderson Photography

Photo Resize and Description by

Two Pentacles Publishing.

 

Abbie, here. If you haven’t already done so, please subscribe to my email list to receive my monthly newsletter and other announcements. This is a one-way announcements list, meaning the only messages you’ll receive will come from me. So, you can rest assured that this list is low-traffic. Send a blank email to:  newsfrommycorner+subscribe@groups.io  You’ll receive a confirmation email. Reply to that with another blank message, and you should be good to go.

 

New! Why Grandma Doesn’t Know Me

Copyright 2021 by Abbie Johnson Taylor.

Independently published with the help of DLD Books.

The cover of the book features an older woman sitting in a wicker chair facing a window. The world beyond the window is bright, and several plants are visible on the terrace. Behind the woman’s chair is another plant, with a tall stalk and wide rounded leaves. The woman has short, white hair, glasses, a red sweater, and tan pants. The border of the picture is a taupe color and reads "Why Grandma Doesn't Know Me" above the photo and "Abbie Johnson Taylor" below it.Photo Resize and Description by

Two Pentacles Publishing.

 

Sixteen-year-old Natalie’s grandmother, suffering from dementia and confined to a wheelchair, lives in a nursing home and rarely recognizes Natalie. But one Halloween night, she tells her a shocking secret that only she and Natalie’s mother know. Natalie is the product of a one-night stand between her mother, who is a college English teacher, and another professor.

After some research, Natalie learns that people with dementia often have vivid memories of past events. Still not wanting to believe what her grandmother has told her, she finds her biological father online. The resemblance between them is undeniable. Not knowing what else to do, she shows his photo and website to her parents.

Natalie realizes she has some growing up to do. Scared and confused, she reaches out to her biological father, and they start corresponding.

Her younger sister, Sarah, senses their parents’ marital difficulties. At Thanksgiving, when she has an opportunity to see Santa Claus, she asks him to bring them together again. Can the jolly old elf grant her request?

***

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To Meme or Not to Meme #OpenBookBlogHop #MondayMusings #Inspiration

Welcome to another edition of Open Book Blog Hop. This week’s question is: What are your favorite writing-related memes? You can click here to participate in this week’s hop and read others’ responses.

Today’s answer is short, but I hope it’s sweet. I don’t use memes. I don’t understand why I should, and I don’t know any writers who do. It’ll be interesting to see what others say. Maybe I’ll change my mind.

How about you authors? Do you use writing-related memes?

 

Abbie wears a blue and white V-neck top with different shades of blue from sky to navy that swirl together with the white. She has short, brown hair and rosy cheeks and smiles at the camera against a black background.

Photo Courtesy of Tess Anderson Photography

Photo Resize and Description by

Two Pentacles Publishing.

 

If you haven’t already done so, please subscribe to my email list to receive my monthly newsletter and other announcements. This is a one-way announcements list, meaning the only messages you’ll receive will come from me. So, you can rest assured that this list is low-traffic. Send a blank email to:  newsfrommycorner+subscribe@groups.io  You’ll receive a confirmation email. Reply to that with another blank message, and you should be good to go.

 

New! Why Grandma Doesn’t Know Me

Copyright 2021 by Abbie Johnson Taylor.

Independently published with the help of DLD Books.

The cover of the book features an older woman sitting in a wicker chair facing a window. The world beyond the window is bright, and several plants are visible on the terrace. Behind the woman’s chair is another plant, with a tall stalk and wide rounded leaves. The woman has short, white hair, glasses, a red sweater, and tan pants. The border of the picture is a taupe color and reads "Why Grandma Doesn't Know Me" above the photo and "Abbie Johnson Taylor" below it.Photo Resize and Description by

Two Pentacles Publishing.

 

Sixteen-year-old Natalie’s grandmother, suffering from dementia and confined to a wheelchair, lives in a nursing home and rarely recognizes Natalie. But one Halloween night, she tells her a shocking secret that only she and Natalie’s mother know. Natalie is the product of a one-night stand between her mother, who is a college English teacher, and another professor.

After some research, Natalie learns that people with dementia often have vivid memories of past events. Still not wanting to believe what her grandmother has told her, she finds her biological father online. The resemblance between them is undeniable. Not knowing what else to do, she shows his photo and website to her parents.

Natalie realizes she has some growing up to do. Scared and confused, she reaches out to her biological father, and they start corresponding.

Her younger sister, Sarah, senses their parents’ marital difficulties. At Thanksgiving, when she has an opportunity to see Santa Claus, she asks him to bring them together again. Can the jolly old elf grant her request?

***

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You Are Enough: A Review of Lessons from the Mountain by Mary McDonough #FantasticFridayReads #Memoir #Inspiration

What Amazon Says

 

“[Not] the typical celebrity memoir . . . as much an account of her decades-long spiritual journey as it is a look back at her TV and movie career.” —Spiritual Pop Culture

“Mary is a whole lot more than Erin on The Waltons. This book shows how she’s handled all the highs and lows with grace.” —George Clooney

For nine seasons, Mary McDonough was part of one of the most beloved families in television history. Just ten years old when she was cast as the pretty, wholesome middle child Erin, Mary grew up on the set of The Waltons, alternately embracing and rebelling against her good-girl onscreen persona. Now, as the first cast member to write about her experiences on the classic series, she candidly recounts the joys and challenges of growing up Walton—from her overnight transformation from a normal kid in a working class, Irish Catholic family, to a Hollywood child star, to the personal challenges that led her to take on a new role as an activist for women’s body image issues.

Touching, funny, sometimes heartbreaking, and always illuminating, Lessons from the Mountain is the story of everything Mary McDonough learned on her journey over—and beyond—that famous mountain.

Includes Never Before Published Bonus Chapter!

“A fascinating look at what it’s like to grow up in front of and beyond the cameras.” —Eve Plumb

“For someone who started out as a sweet little girl afraid to speak up, it certainly is a pleasure to hear her shout from the top of the mountain now!” —Alison Arngrim, New York Times bestselling author

“[A] poignant memoir . . . the actress shares intimate, behind-the-scenes memories.” —Smashing Interviews Magazine

 

Buy from Amazon.

 

My Thoughts

 

This book represents the many facets of Mary McDonough’s life as an actress, wife, mother, activist, and more. Having been a fan of The Waltons, her account of growing up on the set fascinated me. I also enjoyed reading about life with her own family.

Because of her poor self-image, she felt it necessary to have silicone breast implants as an adult. Almost immediately afterward, she developed unusual symptoms. It was years before she was diagnosed with Lupus. Meanwhile, she discovered that other women with these implants had the same symptoms and that there was a definite connection between those symptoms and the implants.

I was saddened and angered by the account of her losing battle with the FDA and companies that manufactured these implants. It also made me mad to think that throughout her life, she had this idea she wasn’t enough and didn’t see otherwise until after she had the implants. If you take anything at all away from this book, it’s this. If people aren’t willing to take you as you are, it’s their problem, not yours.

 

Abbie wears a blue and white V-neck top with different shades of blue from sky to navy that swirl together with the white. She has short, brown hair and rosy cheeks and smiles at the camera against a black background.

Photo Courtesy of Tess Anderson Photography

Photo Resize and Description by

Two Pentacles Publishing.

 

If you haven’t already done so, please subscribe to my email list to receive my monthly newsletter and other announcements. This is a one-way announcements list, meaning the only messages you’ll receive will come from me. So, you can rest assured that this list is low-traffic. Send a blank email to:  newsfrommycorner+subscribe@groups.io  You’ll receive a confirmation email. Reply to that with another blank message, and you should be good to go.

 

New! Why Grandma Doesn’t Know Me

Copyright 2021 by Abbie Johnson Taylor.

Independently published with the help of DLD Books.

The cover of the book features an older woman sitting in a wicker chair facing a window. The world beyond the window is bright, and several plants are visible on the terrace. Behind the woman’s chair is another plant, with a tall stalk and wide rounded leaves. The woman has short, white hair, glasses, a red sweater, and tan pants. The border of the picture is a taupe color and reads "Why Grandma Doesn't Know Me" above the photo and "Abbie Johnson Taylor" below it.Photo Resize and Description by

Two Pentacles Publishing.

 

Sixteen-year-old Natalie’s grandmother, suffering from dementia and confined to a wheelchair, lives in a nursing home and rarely recognizes Natalie. But one Halloween night, she tells her a shocking secret that only she and Natalie’s mother know. Natalie is the product of a one-night stand between her mother, who is a college English teacher, and another professor.

After some research, Natalie learns that people with dementia often have vivid memories of past events. Still not wanting to believe what her grandmother has told her, she finds her biological father online. The resemblance between them is undeniable. Not knowing what else to do, she shows his photo and website to her parents.

Natalie realizes she has some growing up to do. Scared and confused, she reaches out to her biological father, and they start corresponding.

Her younger sister, Sarah, senses their parents’ marital difficulties. At Thanksgiving, when she has an opportunity to see Santa Claus, she asks him to bring them together again. Can the jolly old elf grant her request?

***

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Hiking with a Dog #SixSentenceStoryTHURSDAYLinkUp #WritingPrompts #Inspiration

Max was a blur in the distance, as he dashed ahead of us up the trail. Breathless, I stopped and turned to my husband. “Where does he get all his energy?” I asked.

“I don’t know,” he answered, panting. “I wonder if we could bottle it.”

I laughed. “Oh, just think of the millions we could make.”

***

When I was growing up, my family often hiked with our Irish setter, who ran up and down the trail and was more tired than the rest of us by the end of the day. That, along with GirlieOnTheEdge’s six-sentence prompt, inspired the above work of flash fiction. The given word is “blur.” You can click here to participate in this week’s hop and read other bloggers’ six-sentence creations.

 

Abbie wears a blue and white V-neck top with different shades of blue from sky to navy that swirl together with the white. She has short, brown hair and rosy cheeks and smiles at the camera against a black background.

Photo Courtesy of Tess Anderson Photography

Photo Resize and Description by

Two Pentacles Publishing.

 

If you haven’t already done so, please subscribe to my email list to receive my monthly newsletter and other announcements. This is a one-way announcements list, meaning the only messages you’ll receive will come from me. So, you can rest assured that this list is low-traffic. Send a blank email to:  newsfrommycorner+subscribe@groups.io  You’ll receive a confirmation email. Reply to that with another blank message, and you should be good to go.

 

New! Why Grandma Doesn’t Know Me

Copyright 2021 by Abbie Johnson Taylor.

Independently published with the help of DLD Books.

The cover of the book features an older woman sitting in a wicker chair facing a window. The world beyond the window is bright, and several plants are visible on the terrace. Behind the woman’s chair is another plant, with a tall stalk and wide rounded leaves. The woman has short, white hair, glasses, a red sweater, and tan pants. The border of the picture is a taupe color and reads "Why Grandma Doesn't Know Me" above the photo and "Abbie Johnson Taylor" below it.Photo Resize and Description by

Two Pentacles Publishing.

 

Sixteen-year-old Natalie’s grandmother, suffering from dementia and confined to a wheelchair, lives in a nursing home and rarely recognizes Natalie. But one Halloween night, she tells her a shocking secret that only she and Natalie’s mother know. Natalie is the product of a one-night stand between her mother, who is a college English teacher, and another professor.

After some research, Natalie learns that people with dementia often have vivid memories of past events. Still not wanting to believe what her grandmother has told her, she finds her biological father online. The resemblance between them is undeniable. Not knowing what else to do, she shows his photo and website to her parents.

Natalie realizes she has some growing up to do. Scared and confused, she reaches out to her biological father, and they start corresponding.

Her younger sister, Sarah, senses their parents’ marital difficulties. At Thanksgiving, when she has an opportunity to see Santa Claus, she asks him to bring them together again. Can the jolly old elf grant her request?

***

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