Song Lyric Sunday: Sound of Music Medley

If you would like to participate in the Sunday song lyric tradition started by Helen Vahdati, click here for guidelines. Today, I’m giving you a four-for-one special. A couple of days ago, I performed this medley at a program called Last Friday at First. It takes place on the last Friday of the month at the First Congregational Church, hence the name. Instead of a video, you get to hear me sing these songs as I performed them that night. This is not a live concert recording but close enough. Enjoy, and have a great day.

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sound of music medley.mp3

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Do Ray Me
Written by Oscar Hammerstein II and Richard Rodgers

Do! (a deer, a female deer)
Re! (a drop of golden sun)
Mi! (a name I call myself)
Fa! (a long, long way to run)
So! (a needle pulling thread)
La! (a note to follow so)
Ti!(a drink with jam and bread)
That will bring us back to do

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My Favorite Things
Written by Oscar Hammerstein II

Raindrops on roses
And whiskers on kittens
Bright copper kettles and warm woolen mittens
Brown paper packages tied up with strings
These are a few of my favorite things
Cream-colored ponies and crisp apple strudels
Doorbells and sleigh bells
And schnitzel with noodles
Wild geese that fly with the moon on their wings
These are a few of my favorite things
Girls in white dresses with blue satin sashes
Snowflakes that stay on my nose and eyelashes
Silver-white winters that melt into springs
These are a few of my favorite things
When the dog bites
When the bee stings
When I’m feeling sad
I simply remember my favorite things
And then I don’t feel so bad

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Edelweiss
Written by Robin Spielberg, Richard Rodgers, and Oscar Hammerstein II

Edelweiss Edelweiss
Every morning you greet me
Small and white
Clean and bright
You look happy to meet me
Blossom of snow may you bloom and grow
Bloom and grow forever
Edelweiss Edelweiss
Bless my homeland forever

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Climb Every Mountain
Written by Oscar Hammerstein II and Richard Rodgers

Climb every mountain
Search high and low
Follow every byway
Every path you know
Climb every mountain
Ford every stream
Follow every rainbow
‘Till you find your dream
A dream that will need
All the love you can give
Every day of your life
For as long as you live
Climb every mountain
Ford every stream
Follow every rainbow
‘Till you find your dream

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Abbie Johnson Taylor
We Shall Overcome
How to Build a Better Mousetrap: Recollections and Reflections of a Family Caregiver

That’s Life: New and Selected Poems
My Ideal Partner: How I Met, Married, and Cared for the Man I Loved Despite Debilitating Odds
Like Me on Facebook.

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Sunday Song Lyric: Over the Rainbow/What a Wonderful World

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Instead of my Saturday song feature, I’m trying something a little different. This was started by another blogger, Helen Vahdati. If you’re a blogger who would like to participate, click here for guidelines. Basically, you post song lyrics along with a video of the song. Helen suggests a theme every week, but you can post whatever song you wish as long as you include a reference to who wrote the song, a link to where you found the lyrics, and a link to a video or recording of the song. You may also link to her blog and/or mine.

Today, I’m giving you a two-for-one special. This is a medley of “Over the Rainbow” and “What a Wonderful World,” and the way these two songs are put together is intriguing. I love the vocal and ukulele rift at the beginning and end.

“Over the Rainbow,” as you probably know, is from The Wizard of Oz, one of my favorite movies. In fifth grade, I played Dorothy and sang this song in a production of this. In 2013 after my father passed away, my group sang “What a Wonderful World” at his celebration of life.

I first heard this medley in the waiting room of a doctor’s office where I was with my late husband Bill after he suffered two strokes that paralyzed his left side. At times when I was a caregiver, I wished I could have been taken over the rainbow to a wonderful world. Enjoy, and have a great day.

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Over the Rainbow
Written by Harold Arlen, as sung by Judy Garland

Somewhere over the rainbow
Way up high
There’s a land that I heard of
Once in a lullaby

Somewhere over the rainbow
Skies are blue
And the dreams that you dare to dream
Really do come true

Someday I’ll wish upon a star
And wake up where the clouds are far
Behind me
Where troubles melt like lemon drops
Away above the chimney tops
That’s where you’ll find me

Somewhere over the rainbow
Bluebirds fly
Birds fly over the rainbow
Why then, oh why can’t I?

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What a Wonderful World
Written by Bob Thille (as George Douglas) as sung by Louis Armstrong

[Verse 1]
I see trees of green, red roses too
I see them bloom, for me and for you
And I think to myself
What a wonderful world

[Verse 2]
I see skies of blue, clouds of white
Bright blessed days, dark sacred nights
And I think to myself
What a wonderful world

[Bridge]
The colors of a rainbow
So pretty in the sky
Are also on the faces
Of people going by
I see friends shaking hands, saying how do you do
They’re really saying, I love you

[Verse 3]
I hear babies cry, I watch them grow
They’ll learn much more
Than I’ll never know
And I think to myself
What a wonderful world
Yes, I think to myself
What a wonderful world

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Abbie Johnson Taylor
We Shall Overcome
How to Build a Better Mousetrap: Recollections and Reflections of a Family Caregiver

That’s Life: New and Selected Poems
My Ideal Partner: How I Met, Married, and Cared for the Man I Loved Despite Debilitating Odds
Like Me on Facebook.

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Saturday Song: Jesus Christ Superstar

In the 1960’s, one of the first eight-track tapes I owned was the sound track from this classic rock opera, which deals with Christ’s crucifixion. The album came in two parts, and for a while, I only had the first. In 1971, when my father and I traveled from our home in Tucson, Arizona, to visit relatives in Wyoming, my uncle Jon had both parts on two cassettes. I eventually received, as a gift, another eight-track tape containing both parts. In celebration of Easter, here’s the title song. Enjoy, and have a great Saturday.

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Abbie Johnson Taylor
We Shall Overcome
How to Build a Better Mousetrap: Recollections and Reflections of a Family Caregiver

That’s Life: New and Selected Poems
My Ideal Partner: How I Met, Married, and Cared for the Man I Loved Despite Debilitating Odds
Like Me on Facebook.

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Saturday Song: Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious from Mary Poppins

It’s a supercalifragilisticexpialidocious day here in sunny Florida, and to show you just how great this day is, here’s a song from one of my favorite movies. I triple dog dare you to say, “Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious!” three times fast. Enjoy, and have a great Saturday.

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Abbie Johnson Taylor
We Shall Overcome
How to Build a Better Mousetrap: Recollections and Reflections of a Family Caregiver

That’s Life: New and Selected Poems
My Ideal Partner: How I Met, Married, and Cared for the Man I Loved Despite Debilitating Odds
Like Me on Facebook.

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Thursday Book Feature: Re-blog–Philomena

With St. Patrick’s Day just around the corner, here’s a gripping tale of an Irish woman forced to give up her child at birth who attempts to find him later. When I read this book and saw the movie years ago, it made an impression on me, so much so that I blogged about it several times. Again, here’s my extended review of the book and movie.

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In 1952, you’re a teen-aged girl in Ireland. After a romantic encounter with a man you meet at a fair, you become pregnant. In shame, your family sends you away to a convent.

It’s a breech birth. The nuns have little or no medical training. Other women and children have died during childbirth there and are buried in unmarked graves nearby. The mother superior believes that the pain of childbirth is God’s punishment for carnal sin so no drugs are administered. In agony, as the nun removes the baby with forceps, you beg her not to “let them put him in the ground.” Miraculously, you give birth to a healthy baby boy. Thus begins the story of Philomena, a book I’ve read and a movie I’ve seen.

Martin Sixsmith, the author of The Lost Child of Philomena Lee, (2009) and Philomena, with Dame Judi Dench, (2013) is a British author, Russian scholar, BBC presenter, and former advisor to the government in the United Kingdom. He has written about Russian history, the scandal surrounding the adoption of Irish children by American parents, and other current events. Besides two books about Philomena Lee, the Irish mother forced to give up her child for adoption, his other work includes Russia: A 1000-Year Chronicle of the Wild East, (2012) and Spin. (2005) In his writing, he has also focused on political communication in government. To read more about him, visit http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Martin_Sixsmith.

In Philomena, after a short introduction by Dame Judi Dench, the actress who portrayed her in the movie, Martin Sixsmith starts by describing the details of the birth of Philomena’s son Anthony and their lives afterward in the convent. Philomena and other girls who had babies out of wedlock were virtual prisoners at the convent for four years, working to pay off the cost of their care, so to speak. She worked in the laundry seven days a week and by night, she and the other girls sewed clothes for their children who stayed in the convent until they were adopted. The mothers were allowed daily contact with their children and naturally, they developed close bonds.

Sixsmith also touches on the sale of Irish children to American families by the Catholic Church. He describes how some Irish government officials tried to block such adoptions but were thwarted by the Catholic Church. In 1955, Philomena was forced to sign papers giving Anthony up for adoption, and he was taken to the U.S. to live with a family in Missouri. Mary, a little girl at the convent about the same age who developed a close friendship with Anthony, was also taken by the same family who didn’t want to separate the children.

The remainder of Martin Sixsmith’s book is devoted primarily to Anthony’s story. The family who adopted him and Mary changed his name to Michael, and Sixsmith describes his life growing up in Missouri and Iowa. The friendship between Michael and Mary grew stronger in America, and in later years, Mary was the only one in the family who supported him. All through his life, Michael wondered about his natural mother. His adoptive parents, who knew the truth, thought it better to tell him that his mother abandoned him.

Sixsmith explains how Michael first realized he was gay as a teen-ager. A priest at Notre Dame University told Michael that homosexuality is a sin and encouraged him to purge himself of his desires. Michael tried but found himself becoming more and more involved in such activities.

In the 1970’s after graduating from Notre Dame and receiving a law degree from George Washington University, Michael worked for the National Republican Committee in D.C. and eventually became the chief counsel for the White House. Sixsmith pinpoints the irony of a gay man working for the Republican Party during the Reagan and Bush eras when homosexuality was considered taboo and Republicans blocked funding for AIDS research. This, combined with feelings of abandonment Michael harbored from his childhood, caused mood swings and bouts of drinking and engaging in sadomasochistic activities. Most of his relationships didn’t last long.

In the 1970’s Michael and Mary made a trip to Ireland in an attempt to find their mothers but were told by the nuns at the convent that they had no records. In the 1990’s, after Michael developed AIDS, he made a second trip to Ireland with his partner, Pete Nelson, and was told that records from the 1950’s were destroyed in a fire. They later learned at the bed and breakfast where they were staying that the nuns deliberately set the fire because of an investigation into the Catholic Church’s practice of selling Irish children to American families for adoption. Michael died a year or so later, never knowing about his mother. At his request, he was buried at the convent in Ireland where he was born.

At the end of the book, Martin Sixsmith devotes a couple of chapters to Philomena after Anthony was taken from her in 1955. I would like to have read more about her, but she may not have wanted her life revealed in such detail. After Anthony left the convent, bound for the U.S., the nuns sent Philomena to work at a school for boys in England, and she eventually became a nurse. She married twice and had several children and grandchildren. She made frequent trips to the convent in Ireland to inquire about her son but was rebuffed by the nuns every time. She kept the secret of Anthony’s birth from her family for fifty years.

After she finally broke down and told them, her daughter introduced her to Sixsmith, and the three of them visited the convent in Ireland. By this time, there were different nuns with more liberal views, and through other channels, they were able to learn of Anthony’s life in America and that he passed away and was buried at the convent.

I liked Martin Sixsmith’s style of writing this book. Besides giving us a journalistic rundown of all the events and when they happened, he takes us into the lives of the main characters, telling us what they were feeling and thinking. The book was written like fiction, and I was compelled to keep reading to the end.

On the other hand, the movie doesn’t tell the whole story and uses some artistic license. After Sixsmith meets Philomena’s daughter at a party, he is introduced to her mother, and the two of them travel to Ireland to inquire about Anthony. The nuns tell them their records from the 1950’s were destroyed in a fire and show Philomena the contract she signed, giving Anthony up for adoption that stated she agreed not to try to contact him. Sixsmith later learns from locals in a pub that the nuns started the fire.

The search for Anthony takes Martin and Philomena to Washington, D.C. where they learn of his life and passing. After talking with Mary and Pete Nelson, they learn of Michael’s burial at the convent in Ireland. Upon their return, Martin becomes confrontational with one of the nuns and Philomena finds her son’s grave and says goodbye. I enjoyed the performances of Dame Judi Dench and the other actors, but the movie left a lot to be desired, compared to the book.

According to Sixsmith, Michael requested that “Danny Boy” be sung at his funeral in Washington, D.C. before he was taken to Ireland for burial. This is a song I’ve sung many times in the fifteen years I worked as a music therapist in a nursing home. I can’t think of a better way to end this post. Please click below to hear me sing the song one more time.

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Abbie Johnson Taylor
We Shall Overcome
How to Build a Better Mousetrap: Recollections and Reflections of a Family Caregiver

That’s Life: New and Selected Poems
My Ideal Partner: How I Met, Married, and Cared for the Man I Loved Despite Debilitating Odds
Like Me on Facebook.

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Saturday Song: Snow

Last week, our weather started looking a lot like Christmas, so I could finally identify with the sentiment in this song. It’s from Bing Crosby’s epic White Christmas. If you haven’t seen this movie, I highly recommend it. In any case, enjoy the song, and have a great Saturday and a merry Christmas.

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Author Abbie Johnson Taylor

We Shall Overcome

How to Build a Better Mousetrap: Recollections and Reflections of a Family Caregiver

That’s Life: New and Selected Poems

My Ideal Partner: How I Met, Married, and Cared for the Man I Loved Despite Debilitating Odds

Click to hear an audio trailer.

Like me on Facebook.

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Saturday Song: Chim Chim Cher-ee from Mary Poppins

The other day, I was taking the bus home from Walmart. The sky was growing cloudy, and a fellow passenger and I were speculating as to whether it would rain. The driver chimed in, saying he hoped it wouldn’t because he was expecting someone to come and work on his chimney. This song immediately popped into my head.

Mary Poppins was one of my favorite Julie Andrews movies. When I was a kid, I had a Mary Poppins umbrella and listened to the sound track many times. The song is sung by Dick Van Dyke, who portrays a chimney sweep smitten with Mary Poppins, the mysterious nanny employed by a British family in 1910. I hope it will be a great start to your Saturday. Fall is almost here, so maybe it’s time to get that chimney cleaned.

 

 

Author Abbie Johnson Taylor

We Shall Overcome

How to Build a Better Mousetrap: Recollections and Reflections of a Family Caregiver

That’s Life: New and Selected Poems

My Ideal Partner: How I Met, Married, and Cared for the Man I Loved Despite Debilitating Odds

Click to hear an audio trailer.

Like me on Facebook.