My Ideal Nursing Home #Wednesday Words

If I had unlimited funds to start and maintain a business, I would open a nursing home. But this wouldn’t be just any nursing home run by a corporation whose bottom line is money and not the elderly and infirmed residents who live there. In my facility, caring and not money would truly be the heart of the matter. My facility probably wouldn’t have the capacity that many large, corporate-run homes do, but with a smaller population and more staff members, each person could have more individual attention.

The facility would be all on one floor and divided into four or five units, each with the capacity of twelve residents. Each resident would have his or her own room with an attached bathroom that wouldn’t just contain a toilet and sink but also a roll-in shower. Each unit would have one tub room in case a person prefers a bath instead of a shower.

Each room would also have its own phone, and wireless Internet service would be readily available. Of course, many nursing home residents are unable to use the Internet, but for those few such as my late husband who would benefit, the service would be there. Family members could use it when they come to visit.

Each unit would have its own nurse’s station, dining room, and a lounge with recliners where residents could watch TV or just relax and read a book. Each recliner, like each room, would be outfitted with a call button to make it easier for residents to request assistance when necessary.

Residents would be able to choose what they want to eat each day. At mealtime, a menu would be given to them or read to them if necessary, and their choices would be served restaurant-style.

Residents suffering from dementia would be placed in a locked unit, no different from the others except that all staff working in this unit, including therapists and activity specialists, would have had specialized training in helping residents with dementia.

Of course, my facility wouldn’t have to be a permanent home. It would offer respite care and rehabilitation. The therapy department would have all the necessary equipment and even a swimming pool of no more than five feet, where residents could participate in water therapy and water exercise classes. There could even be a hot tub.

Last but not least, my facility would have a large, centrally located activity room. One half of the room would contain chairs and tables for bingo and social events. The other half would be open and used for church services and other group activities. Any resident from any unit would be able to attend any activity and be notified of events in advance.

Of course, money doesn’t grow on trees or flow freely from a stream. But isn’t it fun to dream of what you could do with a never-ending supply? If you’d like to know more about the nursing home where my late husband recovered from his strokes, you can read My Ideal Partner: How I Met, Married, and Cared for the Man I Loved Despite Debilitating Odds.

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Thanks to Stevie Turner for inspiring the above post. In this week’s Open Book Blog Hop, she asks what kind of business you would start if you had unlimited funding. To learn how you can participate on your own blog, click here.

By the way, for those of you who use the National Library Services for the Blind and Print Disabled, The Red Dress is available for download from their site here. No matter how you read it, please be sure to review it wherever you can. That goes for all my books. Thank you for stopping by. Stay safe, happy, and healthy.

New! The Red Dress

Copyright July 2019 by DLD Books

Front cover contains: young, dark-haired woman in red dress holding flowers

When Eve went to her high school senior prom, she wore a red dress that her mother had made for her. That night, after dancing with the boy of her dreams, she caught him in the act with her best friend. Months later, Eve, a freshman in college, is bullied into giving the dress to her roommate. After her mother finds out, their relationship is never the same again.

Twenty-five years later, Eve, a bestselling author, is happily married with three children. Although her mother suffers from dementia, she still remembers, and Eve still harbors the guilt for giving the dress away. When she receives a Facebook friend request from her old college roommate and an invitation to her twenty-five-year high school class reunion, then meets her former best friend by chance, she must confront the past in order to face the future.

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You Can Beam, but You Can’t Hide #Six-Sentence Thursday

When I was in college, I was a Star Trek fan. Although the idea scared me, I like the concept of the transporter, a device that converted your molecules and atoms into light and beamed you from one place to another. Whenever I was in a situation in which I didn’t want to be, I imagined myself unclipping a communicator from my belt and saying, “Scottie, beam me out of here!” In a flash of light, I was gone. Oh, if it only were that easy. Unfortunately, our problems always find us, no matter what method we use to escape them.

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The above is in response to Girlie on the Edge’s six-sentence prompt for this week. The idea is to write a story or poem of no more and no less than six sentences, using the prompt word, “beam,” at least once. If you’d like to participate in this on your own blog, click here. Otherwise, you can leave your six-sentence creation in the comment field below.

By the way, for those of you who use the National Library Services for the Blind and Print Disabled, The Red Dress is available for download from their site here. No matter how you read it, please be sure to review it wherever you can. That goes for all my books. Thank you for stopping by. Stay safe, happy, and healthy.

New! The Red Dress

Copyright July 2019 by DLD Books

Front cover contains: young, dark-haired woman in red dress holding flowers

When Eve went to her high school senior prom, she wore a red dress that her mother had made for her. That night, after dancing with the boy of her dreams, she caught him in the act with her best friend. Months later, Eve, a freshman in college, is bullied into giving the dress to her roommate. After her mother finds out, their relationship is never the same again.

Twenty-five years later, Eve, a bestselling author, is happily married with three children. Although her mother suffers from dementia, she still remembers, and Eve still harbors the guilt for giving the dress away. When she receives a Facebook friend request from her old college roommate and an invitation to her twenty-five-year high school class reunion, then meets her former best friend by chance, she must confront the past in order to face the future.

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Image contains: Abbie, smiling.

The Earring Debacle #Wednesday Words

When I was thirteen years old, I couldn’t get motivated to do much reading on my own, due to my visual impairment. I preferred to have my mother read to me instead. One book we read together was about a Jewish family in New York who had five girls and one boy. It was part of a series that I believe was called All of a Kind.

One of the girls in the story, who was my age, had her ears pierced. I found this process horrifying and vowed no jeweler would stick my earlobes with a needle just so I could wear earrings. Mother must have thought otherwise, for on the afternoon of Christmas Eve, she bundled my younger brother and me into the car, telling us we needed to do an errand. When I asked her where we were going, she said, “You’ll see.”

At the time, I’d requested, for Christmas, an electric chord organ I’d seen in a department store. So, I thought we were going to purchase it, but how would we get it home in our Mercedes Benz? As Mother pulled into a parking space downtown, she said, “Well, Andy, shall we tell her?”

“Yeah!” my younger brother answered.

Turning to me, as I sat next to her in the front seat, Mother said, “You’re going to get your ears pierced today.”

I was mortified. The last thing I wanted was to have my ears pierced. But I’d been raised to be appreciative of gifts, even when I didn’t want them. So, what could I say?

The jewelry store was packed with exuberant children and harried adults, doing their last-minute Christmas shopping, but I was far from happy. The woman who finally took us into a back room must have been reading my mind because she said, “Hon, are you sure you want to do this?”

I could have said no, but Mother would have gotten mad, and Andy would have called me a chicken. So, I pasted a smile on my face and said yes.

After applying plenty of alcohol to both my earlobes, she did it with a sort of hole-puncher that inserted earrings. It hurt a lot! In order for the holes to stay open, I needed to wear these earrings for at least six months. They had to be turned and alcohol applied to my lobes several times a day, and my earlobes were sore at times. Mother bought me pair after pair of earrings, which I reluctantly but diligently wore. In school, I was envied by other girls who didn’t have pierced ears.

Eventually, my ears became infected, and I had to let them close over, much to my relief and Mother’s consternation. By the way, I did get that electric chord organ for Christmas, and it was one of the best gifts I’d ever received. Now, besides the piano, I had one more instrument I could play.

How about you? What was the worst Christmas present you ever received? Thanks to blogger Stevie Turner for inspiring this. She also asks what was the worst gift you ever gave. I can’t think of any, but maybe you can. If so, you can share your memories in the comment field below or click here to participate in Stevie’s blog hop.

Please note that for the next few days, I’ll be taking a staycation to celebrate Thanksgiving. This means there will be no posts either here or on Facebook Thursday, Friday, Saturday, or Sunday. If you’re in the United States, I hope you have a safe and happy holiday, and will see you back here Monday.

By the way, for those of you who use the National Library Services for the Blind and Print Disabled, The Red Dress is available for download from their site here. No matter how you read it, please be sure to review it wherever you can. That goes for all my books. Thank you for stopping by. Stay safe, happy, and healthy.

New! The Red Dress

Copyright July 2019 by DLD Books

Front cover contains: young, dark-haired woman in red dress holding flowers

When Eve went to her high school senior prom, she wore a red dress that her mother had made for her. That night, after dancing with the boy of her dreams, she caught him in the act with her best friend. Months later, Eve, a freshman in college, is bullied into giving the dress to her roommate. After her mother finds out, their relationship is never the same again.

Twenty-five years later, Eve, a bestselling author, is happily married with three children. Although her mother suffers from dementia, she still remembers, and Eve still harbors the guilt for giving the dress away. When she receives a Facebook friend request from her old college roommate and an invitation to her twenty-five-year high school class reunion, then meets her former best friend by chance, she must confront the past in order to face the future.

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My Life and the Coronavirus #Wednesday Words

Last March, when COVID19 restrictions were first put into place, if I’d still been working as a registered music therapist in a nursing home, my routine would have been drastically affected. Group activities would have been limited, if even permitted at all. I would have spent a lot more time with residents in their rooms and would, no doubt, have heard complaints from those who enjoyed my group sessions about the lack of them.

Residents might not have even been allowed to congregate in lobbies or eat in the dining areas. All staff would probably have been pressed into meal delivery service. This would have been tricky for me, due to my limited vision, because, unless labels on trays were in large enough print for me to read, I could have given the wrong resident the wrong meal. This could have had serious consequences for people on special diets. I’m so glad that in 2005, I decided to quit practicing music therapy and write full-time.

Before the COVID19 restrictions, although I wasn’t working as a registered music therapist with seniors, I still volunteered at nursing homes and other facilities at least once a month, entertaining residents by playing my guitar and singing. This took more time than you might imagine because, like all musicians, I had to practice. I also needed to learn new songs residents requested or that I thought they might enjoy, as I did when I was practicing music therapy. Once the pandemic became prevalent last March, all senior facilities were on lockdown and are still on lockdown today. This has given me more time to write.

During the first couple of months of restrictions, the local YMCA was closed. So, I couldn’t attend water exercise classes, either. I started working out at home, which didn’t take nearly as much time as a trip to the Y. Thus, I had even more time.

Now, the Y is open, and I go there three days a week, as usual. That could change, depending on what restrictions our state’s governor puts into place this week in response to the rising number of COVID19 cases. I’ll be so glad when this pandemic is behind us. Although I may not have as much time to write, I’ll again be able to do other things I enjoy besides writing and entertaining seniors, including attending concerts and plays, eating out, and singing with my group.

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What about you? How has COVID19 affected your life or your writing? You can either sound off in the comments field below or click here to participate in Stevie Turner’s Open Book Blog Hop on the subject.

By the way, for those of you who use the National Library Services for the Blind and Print Disabled, The Red Dress is available for download from their site here. No matter how you read it, please be sure to review it wherever you can. That goes for all my books. Thank you for stopping by. Stay safe, happy, and healthy.

New! The Red Dress

Copyright July 2019 by DLD Books

Front cover contains: young, dark-haired woman in red dress holding flowers

When Eve went to her high school senior prom, she wore a red dress that her mother had made for her. That night, after dancing with the boy of her dreams, she caught him in the act with her best friend. Months later, Eve, a freshman in college, is bullied into giving the dress to her roommate. After her mother finds out, their relationship is never the same again.

Twenty-five years later, Eve, a bestselling author, is happily married with three children. Although her mother suffers from dementia, she still remembers, and Eve still harbors the guilt for giving the dress away. When she receives a Facebook friend request from her old college roommate and an invitation to her twenty-five-year high school class reunion, then meets her former best friend by chance, she must confront the past in order to face the future.

***

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Image contains: Abbie, smiling.

Overrated or Underrated #TMI Tuesday

My answers to this week’s questions are a matter of personal preference. After you read them, you can scroll down to learn how to participate.

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Tell us what you think. Are the following overrated or underrated? Why?

 

Birkin Bags

 

I must admit I’d never heard of a Birkin bag until I clicked on the above link. Right now, I don’t need such a bag, but maybe in the future… They’re definitely nice.

 

iPhone

 

A year ago, I declared I wouldn’t touch a touch screen with a ten-foot pole. A few months ago, that changed when I bought my first iPhone after becoming disillusioned with the device I was using. I’m amazed with all the iPhone can do and can’t imagine how I lived without it.

 

Writing a Book and Self-Publishing

 

This is a no-brainer. I’ve self-published four books and will self-publish another book when it’s ready. I published one chapbook with a traditional publisher, and because of negative experiences, I won’t submit to them or any other such publisher if I can help it. I found a great business, DLD Books, that helps authors self-publish their work on Amazon, Smashwords, and other sites, and I highly recommend them.

 

Scruffy, Short Beards

 

When my husband Bill was alive, before he suffered two strokes that paralyzed his left side, his face was as smooth as a baby’s bottom, and I loved it that way. After the strokes, he needed help shaving. Since I didn’t feel comfortable wielding a razor due to my limited vision, it was up to the aides who came to our home three days a week to give him showers. His face was never quite as smooth, but I was grateful that they made an effort. If I had a choice, though, I wouldn’t want my man to wear any kind of beard or mustache.

 

Hoodies

 

Bill loved his hoodies, especially during the winter months. As he grew older, he  became more sensitive to cold. So, his favorite pastime was reading in his recliner, covered with a blanket and poncho, the hood of his sweatshirt covering his head and face.

Now that he’s gone, I occasionally wear one of his hoodies if I’m not planning to go anywhere. They’re a little big for me, but they’re warm, and they make me feel closer to him.

 

HIIT Workouts

 

This was something else I hadn’t heard of until now. Frankly, I prefer my water fitness classes at the YMCA. I like exercising in the water because it offers more resistance, and although you still work up a sweat, you don’t feel it, and you don’t notice the intensity, either. Our classes last an hour and include cardio and muscle toning.

 

Boxer Briefs

 

Before Bill’s strokes, he wore boxer briefs, and only boxer briefs, to bed. This was because he often got hot during the night. After his strokes, because he couldn’t get up and walk to the bathroom on his own, he slept in the buff. That way, when he needed to go in the night, he could use the urinal more easily. You can read more about Bill and me in My Ideal Partner: How I Met, Married, and Cared for the Man I Loved Despite Debilitating Odds. Since I’m not a man, I could take or leave boxer briefs.

 

Bonus: Avocado Toast

 

I don’t care for avocado, and I’m not a fan of toast. So, in my opinion, that’s definitely overrated.

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Now, it’s your turn. To learn how to play TMI Tuesday on your blog, click here. Otherwise, you can leave your answers in the comment field below.

By the way, for those of you who use the National Library Services for the Blind and Print Disabled, The Red Dress is available for download from their site here. No matter how you read it, please be sure to review it wherever you can. That goes for all my books. Thank you for stopping by. Stay safe, happy, and healthy.

New! The Red Dress

Copyright July 2019 by DLD Books

Front cover contains: young, dark-haired woman in red dress holding flowers

When Eve went to her high school senior prom, she wore a red dress that her mother had made for her. That night, after dancing with the boy of her dreams, she caught him in the act with her best friend. Months later, Eve, a freshman in college, is bullied into giving the dress to her roommate. After her mother finds out, their relationship is never the same again.

Twenty-five years later, Eve, a bestselling author, is happily married with three children. Although her mother suffers from dementia, she still remembers, and Eve still harbors the guilt for giving the dress away. When she receives a Facebook friend request from her old college roommate and an invitation to her twenty-five-year high school class reunion, then meets her former best friend by chance, she must confront the past in order to face the future.

***

My Books

My Amazon Author Page

Facebook

Website

 

 

Image contains: Abbie, smiling.