Novella Tells Compelling Family Story #FridayFunReads #BookReviews #Inspiration

Image contains: Abbie, smiling.

I reviewed this book here a couple of years ago after it was published. I’ve since revised it to reflect the times. Now that Thanksgiving has passed, those of you in the United States who celebrate will still enjoy reading this book.

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You Can Thank Me Later

by Kelly Harms

Copyright 2019

 

Every year, Sophie, a chef, hosts her family’s Thanksgiving dinner at her restaurant. This novella is divided into three parts: Thanksgiving 2016, Thanksgiving 2018, and Thanksgiving 2020. With the help of an interesting cast of characters and a series of events, some hilarious, she comes to realize she has a lot for which to be thankful.

I like how each of the three parts begins with messages from family members who call Sophie on Thanksgiving Day when she’s apparently too busy preparing the meal to answer the phone. In the version I downloaded from Audible, beeps are inserted to make it sound like you’re listening to them on an answering machine. Actually, I think Sophie is using a cell phone, and voicemail doesn’t sound like that, but I’m not sure how it could have been rectified.

I was a bit disconcerted when I got to the last part, Thanksgiving 2020. When I first wrote this review a couple of years ago after the book was published, we weren’t in the midst of the coronavirus pandemic. So, this section doesn’t reflect that. However, there’s nothing wrong with escaping to a parallel world in which COVID never happened. But I don’t see why the author couldn’t have started with 2014, then moved on to 2016, then 2018.

Although this book is considered chic lit, it’s a wholesome, feel-good, holiday story. The Audible original isn’t very long, only a little over three hours. So, whether you’re a chic or not, you can enjoy it with a glass of wine or a turkey sandwich.

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New! Why Grandma Doesn’t Know Me

Copyright 2021 by Abbie Johnson Taylor.

Independently published with the help of DLD Books.

Front cover image contains: elderly woman in red sweater sitting next to a window.

Sixteen-year-old Natalie’s grandmother, suffering from dementia and confined to a wheelchair, lives in a nursing home and rarely recognizes Natalie. But one Halloween night, she tells her a shocking secret that only she and Natalie’s mother know. Natalie is the product of a one-night stand between her mother, who is a college English teacher, and another professor.

After some research, Natalie learns that people with dementia often have vivid memories of past events. Still not wanting to believe what her grandmother has told her, she finds her biological father online. The resemblance between them is undeniable. Not knowing what else to do, she shows his photo and website to her parents.

Natalie realizes she has some growing up to do. Scared and confused, she reaches out to her biological father, and they start corresponding.

Her younger sister, Sarah, senses their parents’ marital difficulties. At Thanksgiving, when she has an opportunity to see Santa Claus, she asks him to bring them together again. Can the jolly old elf grant her request?

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Books

My Amazon Author Page

Facebook

Website

 

 

Trying to Avoid Grandma #ItsSixSentenceStoryThursdayLinkup #Excerpts #Inspiration

Image contains: Abbie, smiling.

Welcome to another edition of Six-Sentence Story Thursday Link Up. This week’s word is “lost.” Here’s a six-sentence excerpt from my latest book, Why Grandma Doesn’t Know Me.

It’s Halloween night, and the nursing home, where sixteen-year-old Natalie’s grandmother lives, is having a party. Children are invited to trick-or-treat. Residents are given candy to hand out, and staff and volunteers facilitate games for the children. In this scene, Natalie is trying unsuccessfully to get out of taking her ten-year-old sister there, since their grandmother no longer recognizes Natalie. As the scene opens, the family is at the dinner table, and Natalie’s mother is talking to Sarah about the party.

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“I can’t guarantee they’ll have butterscotch, but I’m sure they’ll have other flavors you like.”

Sarah brightened, and Mom said, “Natalie, you promised yesterday. Please? After tonight, I promise you’ll never have to see your grandmother again.”

I looked to Dad for more help, but he only shrugged. “Whatever,” I said, turning my attention to my spaghetti, although I’d lost my appetite.

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Thanks to Girlie on the Edge for inspiring the above with her six-sentence prompt for this week. You can click here to participate in this week’s hop and read other bloggers’ six-sentence creations. If you live in the United States, I hope you have a happy and safe Thanksgiving.

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New! Why Grandma Doesn’t Know Me

Copyright 2021 by Abbie Johnson Taylor.

Independently published with the help of DLD Books.

Front cover image contains: elderly woman in red sweater sitting next to a window.

Sixteen-year-old Natalie’s grandmother, suffering from dementia and confined to a wheelchair, lives in a nursing home and rarely recognizes Natalie. But one Halloween night, she tells her a shocking secret that only she and Natalie’s mother know. Natalie is the product of a one-night stand between her mother, who is a college English teacher, and another professor.

After some research, Natalie learns that people with dementia often have vivid memories of past events. Still not wanting to believe what her grandmother has told her, she finds her biological father online. The resemblance between them is undeniable. Not knowing what else to do, she shows his photo and website to her parents.

Natalie realizes she has some growing up to do. Scared and confused, she reaches out to her biological father, and they start corresponding.

Her younger sister, Sarah, senses their parents’ marital difficulties. At Thanksgiving, when she has an opportunity to see Santa Claus, she asks him to bring them together again. Can the jolly old elf grant her request?

***

Books

My Amazon Author Page

Facebook

Website

 

 

Accepting and Walking the Journey of a Committed Guide Dog Handler #WordPress Wednesday #Reblogs #Inspiration

Image contains: Abbie, smiling.

According to fellow author Patty Fletcher, who has written about her experiences with guide dogs, many people don’t understand that handling a guide dog is different from having a dog as a pet. In order for a blind handler to develop and continue a good working relationship with a dog, handler and dog must be inseparable at all times. The handler relies on the dog to help him/her navigate both indoors and outside.

Surely you wouldn’t ask a friend who depends on oxygen to leave his/her portable tank at home when you go out to eat. The same goes for guide dogs. Now, here’s Patty to elaborate.

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Today, is forecast to be cloudy and a bit rainy but as I say, the sun is always shining behind the clouds.

Anyhow, this afternoon, I’m Pleased and Privileged to be going out with a friend for another birthday celebration. This makes two friends who have taken me out this year, which is kind of a new thing for me. It’s been many years since I had real friends. Let alone friends who wanted to be part of my life in such a way as to go out with me and my guide dogs.

Read the rest on Patty’s Worlds here.

Following Autumn Moisture #Poetry #TuesdayTidbit

Image contains: Abbie, smiling.Following Autumn Moisture

by Abbie Johnson Taylor

 

 

Bright
sunlight
streams through my
kitchen window.
After days of rain,
I rejoice in the sun.
The few songbirds that are left
sing their boisterous welcome to fall.
When I take a walk, I see blue sky.
Fallen leaves crunch beneath my feet and cane.

***

The above poem was published in this year’s fall print issue of The Avocet. You can click below to hear me read it.

following autumn moisture

New! Why Grandma Doesn’t Know Me

Copyright 2021 by Abbie Johnson Taylor.

Independently published with the help of DLD Books.

Front cover image contains: elderly woman in red sweater sitting next to a window.

Sixteen-year-old Natalie’s grandmother, suffering from dementia and confined to a wheelchair, lives in a nursing home and rarely recognizes Natalie. But one Halloween night, she tells her a shocking secret that only she and Natalie’s mother know. Natalie is the product of a one-night stand between her mother, who is a college English teacher, and another professor.

After some research, Natalie learns that people with dementia often have vivid memories of past events. Still not wanting to believe what her grandmother has told her, she finds her biological father online. The resemblance between them is undeniable. Not knowing what else to do, she shows his photo and website to her parents.

Natalie realizes she has some growing up to do. Scared and confused, she reaches out to her biological father, and they start corresponding.

Her younger sister, Sarah, senses their parents’ marital difficulties. At Thanksgiving, when she has an opportunity to see Santa Claus, she asks him to bring them together again. Can the jolly old elf grant her request?

***

Books

My Amazon Author Page

Facebook

Website

 

 

A Kick-Ass Beginning #OpenBookBlogHop #Inspiration #Writing

Image contains: Abbie, smiling.

Welcome to another edition of Open Book Blog Hop. This week’s question is: “Which part of your book do you spend the most time on? Beginning, middle or end? Something else?”

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I try to spend equal amounts of time on all parts of my books. Some authors prefer to write scenes out of order, but to me, it makes more sense to write novels from beginning to end. I start my stories with a hook and end with a bang. Speaking of hooks, here’s an excerpt from the beginning of my new book, Why Grandma Doesn’t Know Me, told from the point of view of sixteen-year-old Natalie. I hope this will entice you to read more.

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I hated walking with my mom and sister down that long, bright hallway in the nursing home where my grandma lived. The white tile floor and the ceiling covered with fluorescent lights reminded me of school. The only difference was that there were handrails on either side that old people could hold onto while they walked, so they wouldn’t fall.

The blare of television sets from just about every room we passed, laughter and chatter from the nurses’ station, and announcements over the PA system made me wonder why Dad called this place a rest home. The sharp aroma of disinfectant reminded me of the monthly trips I’d made to the dentist years before to have my braces adjusted. I nearly gagged as I remembered the goop they put in my mouth so they could take impressions of my teeth before the braces were put on. The stench of poop and piss from some of the rooms was overpowering.

We finally reached Grandma’s room, and for once, there was silence and only the smell of her perfume. Her bed was next to the window, and she sat in her wheelchair, wearing white pants and a blue, checked blouse. Her curly gray hair was cut short and pushed away from her face. She had a roommate, but the other lady wasn’t there. It was just us.

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How about you authors out there? Do you spend more time on one part of your books than you do other parts? You can sound off in the comment field or click here to participate in this week’s hop and read what other bloggers have to say.

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New! Why Grandma Doesn’t Know Me

Copyright 2021 by Abbie Johnson Taylor.

Independently published with the help of DLD Books.

Front cover image contains: elderly woman in red sweater sitting next to a window.

Sixteen-year-old Natalie’s grandmother, suffering from dementia and confined to a wheelchair, lives in a nursing home and rarely recognizes Natalie. But one Halloween night, she tells her a shocking secret that only she and Natalie’s mother know. Natalie is the product of a one-night stand between her mother, who is a college English teacher, and another professor.

After some research, Natalie learns that people with dementia often have vivid memories of past events. Still not wanting to believe what her grandmother has told her, she finds her biological father online. The resemblance between them is undeniable. Not knowing what else to do, she shows his photo and website to her parents.

Natalie realizes she has some growing up to do. Scared and confused, she reaches out to her biological father, and they start corresponding.

Her younger sister, Sarah, senses their parents’ marital difficulties. At Thanksgiving, when she has an opportunity to see Santa Claus, she asks him to bring them together again. Can the jolly old elf grant her request?

***

Books

My Amazon Author Page

Facebook

Website