Christmas Bowl #Tuesday Tidbit, #Essay

Image contains: Abbie, smiling.As a kid, I was forced to try a variety of sports in school. Due in part to my visual impairment, I wasn’t successful at any of them. I either fell on my face or was hit in the nose with a ball. But in college, I found a sport I could do pretty well, despite the visual impairment, and without injury.

In 1981, I was entering my second year at Sheridan College in Sheridan, Wyoming. I was required to take at least two semesters of physical education. I signed up for bowling because to me, that seemed to require the least amount of athletic ability, and the chance of injury was slim.

The first few days of class were humiliating. I found that no matter what I did, the ball always ended up in the gutter. Fortunately, nobody laughed at me, which they would have done in elementary school. But between frames, I watched other students bowl strikes and spares and heard them cheering for one another and was depressed by the realization that no one was cheering for me.

The instructor saw that I was floundering and tossed me a lifeline. She arranged for me to have a lane all to myself, so I  would have an opportunity to practice continually without having to wait my turn. She also worked with me to perfect my arm movement, so I could aim the ball right down the center of the lane.

Gradually, I improved. My gutter balls became less and less frequent, and I hit more and more pins. One day, I finally bowled a strike, and the alley reverberated with the cheers of my classmates.

By the time the holidays rolled around, my average score was seventy-six. I loved bowling and wanted to practice in order to improve my game. I even watched the professional tour on television.

I was living at home at the time. Since I couldn’t drive, it was impossible for me to borrow the car and drive out to the bowling alley whenever I wanted. So, I constantly begged my parents to take me bowling, which they readily agreed to do most of the time. We would often go as a family, with my younger brother Andy tagging along. At Thanksgiving, when my uncle, aunt, and cousins from out of town were visiting, I even talked them into bowling with us, and we all had a wonderful time!

As Christmas grew closer, I became somewhat depressed, as I realized that the bowling class wouldn’t continue the second semester. I had really come to enjoy it and wondered if I would ever bowl again once the term ended. Then, to my wondering eyes on Christmas morning, there appeared a bowling ball, a pair of shoes, and a bag in which to carry them. Santa Claus even brought me an electronic bowling game. My parents realized that I was serious about this sport, just as Andy had been serious about tennis a few years earlier.

Through the years, I continued to bowl, although not as frequently, due to having other interests and obligations. One year, I joined a team on a ladies’ bowling league. We only bowled a few times, and the team finally broke up due to lack of interest. I offered my services to another team captain I knew, but I was never called. Perhaps my seventy-six average didn’t make me league material.

Now, although I still have the bag with the ball and shoes, I haven’t bowled in years. But I still have the memory of that seventy-six bowling average. That was one of the best Christmas presents I ever received.

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The above essay is in response to Dr. Crystal Grimes’ holiday blogging party, in which you can participate here. This essay was published years ago in Christmas in the Country, an anthology of work by disabled authors. It has since been revised.

By the way, for those of you who use the National Library Service for the Blind and Print Disabled, The Red Dress is available for download from their site here. No matter how you read it, please be sure to review it wherever you can. That goes for all my books. Thank you for stopping by. Stay safe, happy, and healthy.

New! The Red Dress

Copyright July 2019 by DLD Books

Front cover contains: young, dark-haired woman in red dress holding flowers

When Eve went to her high school senior prom, she wore a red dress that her mother had made for her. That night, after dancing with the boy of her dreams, she caught him in the act with her best friend. Months later, Eve, a freshman in college, is bullied into giving the dress to her roommate. After her mother finds out, their relationship is never the same again.

Twenty-five years later, Eve, a bestselling author, is happily married with three children. Although her mother suffers from dementia, she still remembers, and Eve still harbors the guilt for giving the dress away. When she receives a Facebook friend request from her old college roommate and an invitation to her twenty-five-year high school class reunion, then meets her former best friend by chance, she must confront the past in order to face the future.

***

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Deck the Halls/It’s Beginning to Look a Lot Like Christmas #Monday Musical Memories

When I was growing up in Tucson, Arizona, my family made the yearly pilgrimage to the Christmas tree lot. Unlike other places, Arizona rarely had snow at Christmas or any other time of the year. Unlike other families, we didn’t trek into the forest to cut a tree. Dad didn’t even own an ax or chain saw back then.

At the lot, I wandered among the trees, touching their branches, breathing in the aroma of fresh pine, and occasionally singing what little words I knew of  “Oh Christmas Tree.” I wanted every tree. Because of my limited vision, my parents didn’t take my suggestions to heart. We finally found the perfect tree and hauled it home. Then, the real fun began.

While Christmas music played on the phonograph, I watched, fascinated, as Mother and Dad, with meticulous care, strung the lights on the tree. At first, tinsel was used. But when my baby brother, then the cats, pulled it off the tree and dragged it all over the house, my parents gave up on that idea.

Once the lights were strung, the decorations were hung. I loved the colored glass balls. Mother showed me how to hang each one on a branch and take care that it wasn’t placed on the same branch as another ornament. We also had angels, snowmen, Santa Claus figurines, and, of course, candy canes, which didn’t last long after my younger brother developed an appetite for them. I believe most of the decorations were handed down from my grandmother or great-grandmother.

After we moved to Sheridan, Wyoming, in 1973 when I was twelve, we discovered that most tree lots were indoors. But it was still fun to purchase, take home, and decorate a Christmas tree. Nowadays, with just me in the house, I don’t bother with a tree or any decorations. Besides, there’s no room in my living room for a tree. Although I can appreciate Christmas trees and ornaments despite my visual impairment, if I’m the only one around to see them most of the time, to me, it’s not worth the time, money, and effort. Instead, I play recorded Christmas music when I’m working or doing other things.

Today, I’m singing two songs for the price of one. They’re both about decorating for the holidays. Click the link below to hear them and enjoy!

 

Deck the Halls/It’s beginning to Look a Lot Like Christmas

 

How about you? What do you remember about decorating for the holidays when you were growing up? Did you cut a tree in the forest or buy one from a lot? What kind of decorations did you have? Were they handed down through generations?

 

New! The Red Dress

Copyright July 2019 by DLD Books

Front cover contains: young, dark-haired woman in red dress holding flowers

When Eve went to her high school senior prom, she wore a red dress that her mother had made for her. That night, after dancing with the boy of her dreams, she caught him in the act with her best friend. Months later, Eve, a freshman in college, is bullied into giving the dress to her roommate. After her mother finds out, their relationship is never the same again.

Twenty-five years later, Eve, a bestselling author, is happily married with three children. Although her mother suffers from dementia, she still remembers, and Eve still harbors the guilt for giving the dress away. When she receives a Facebook friend request from her old college roommate and an invitation to her twenty-five-year high school class reunion, then meets her former best friend by chance, she must confront the past in order to face the future.

***

My Books

My Amazon Author Page

Facebook

WebsiteImage contains: Abbie, smiling.