A giveaway and book Review, October 14, 2021 #Reblogs

Image contains: Abbie, smiling.Thanks to fellow blogger Carol Farnsworth for her great review of my latest book, Why Grandma Doesn’t Know Me. You’ll also find, in her post, instructions on how you can win a free signed copy of her poetry collection, Leaf Memories, which I reviewed here at: https://abbiescorner.wordpress.com/2021/08/13/nature-poetry-for-all-seasons-fridayfunreads/ Happy reading! To learn more about my new novel and find out where to get your copy, visit:  https://www.abbiejohnsontaylor.com

traveling up and down the blind highway of lifeBlind on the Lite Side

I am sitting here at my desk after finishing a fellow author’s book, “Why Grandma Doesn’t Know Me.” But first , I want to tell you of an opportunity to put your name in for a drawing for my signed chapbook,”Leaf Memories.” Go to

http://www.handyuncappedpen.com/2021/10/giveaway-leaf-memories-by-carol.html

Just go to the site of the Handy uncapped pen and write a comment or put your name and email under the cover photo of Leaf Memories, to have your name in the drawing. While you are there, check out this blog source for writers with disabilities.

Now to my review of Abbie Taylor’s newest novel. The title refers to one of the characters, a Grandma with dementia . She fails to recognize one of her grandaughters. In a moment of clarity, she reveals a family secret that threatens to change the family forever.

I was in the room with Natalie when her Grandma in…

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Some Interesting Reads #OpenBookBlogHop #TuesdayTidbit

Image contains: Abbie, smiling.

Welcome to another edition of Open Book Blog Hop. This week’s question is:  “What’s on your “TBR” (to be read) list?”

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Twelve books are listed in my iPhone’s reminders app. I won’t mention all of them, but I’ll talk about a few.

First of all, I’m currently reading The Four Winds by Kristin Hannah. In Texas during the 1920’s, a rich girl, considered not marriage material because of her looks, ends up marrying a farm boy. Twelve years later, her family, after barely surviving four years of drought, plagued by lost crops and livestock, dust storms, and illness, is planning to leave Texas for California.

By the time you read this post, on Tuesday, October 12th, I will be farther along in the book. But as I write this, on Saturday, October 9th, that’s where things stand. It’s a depressing book, and I’ve been tempted to not finish it. But now, I need to know what happens to these characters and can only hope this book doesn’t end like John Steinbeck’s The Grapes of Wrath.

Next, I plan to read something I hope will be more positive. Lonnie Love is a black comedian whom I’d never heard of until I recently read an excerpt from her book, I Tried to Change So You Don’t Have To, in Reader’s Digest. One takeaway I got from this is the idea that you can’t let others’ stereotypes define who you are. This book ought to be interesting.

Last but not least, I found a novel, Clara and the Sun by Kazuo Ishiguro. It’s about  a female robot who is purchased to be a companion to a sick girl. I haven’t been into science fiction much these days, but this sounds intriguing.

How about you? What are you reading now? What do you plan to read in the future? You can sound off in the comment field below or click here to participate in this week’s hop and read what others have to say. Happy reading!

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New! Why Grandma Doesn’t Know Me

Copyright 2021 by Abbie Johnson Taylor.

Independently published with the help of DLD Books.

Front cover image contains: elderly woman in red sweater sitting next to a window.

Sixteen-year-old Natalie’s grandmother, suffering from dementia and confined to a wheelchair, lives in a nursing home and rarely recognizes Natalie. But one Halloween night, she tells her a shocking secret that only she and Natalie’s mother know. Natalie is the product of a one-night stand between her mother, who is a college English teacher, and another professor.

After some research, Natalie learns that people with dementia often have vivid memories of past events. Still not wanting to believe what her grandmother has told her, she finds her biological father online. The resemblance between them is undeniable. Not knowing what else to do, she shows his photo and website to her parents.

Natalie realizes she has some growing up to do. Scared and confused, she reaches out to her biological father, and they start corresponding.

Her younger sister, Sarah, senses their parents’ marital difficulties. At Thanksgiving, when she has an opportunity to see Santa Claus, she asks him to bring them together again. Can the jolly old elf grant her request?

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Respecting One another’s Reading Preferences #OpenBookBlogHop #TuesdayTidbit

Image contains: Abbie, smiling.

Welcome to another edition of Open Book Blog Hop. This week’s question is: “Have you experienced or witnessed genre shaming, where readers/authors degrade a genre? If so, how do you deal with it?

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When I was a teenager, my mother bought me a Harlequin romance novel. I made the mistake of mentioning it at the dinner table. My father said, “Why are you reading that trash?”

Mother stood up for me, but I don’t remember what she said. I do recall that I didn’t finish the book, not because of what Dad said but because I was taken aback by the myriad sex scenes. This might have been something Mother enjoyed when she was a teenager, but it wasn’t for me. However, I would never have called it trash.

I don’t particularly care for certain genres such as horror or erotica, but I would never begrudge someone else the pleasure of reading such material by degrading it. I’m not a religious person, but I believe in doing or not doing unto others what you would or would not have them do unto you. I wouldn’t want anyone to degrade the genres I write and read. So, I’m not about to degrade a genre I don’t like just because I don’t like it.

We all have different likes and dislikes and the right to express such likes and dislikes. Saying you don’t like a particular genre is okay, but making people feel bad because they read a particular genre isn’t cool. So, before you degrade a genre you don’t like, ask yourself if you would want someone to degrade a genre you enjoy reading.

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How about you? Have you ever experienced genre shaming? If so, how have you dealt with it? You can participate in this week’s hop and read what other bloggers have to say by clicking here. You can also learn more about genre shaming by reading this article from The Washington Independent Review of Books.

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For those of you who use the National Library Service for the Blind and Print Disabled, The Red Dress is available for download from their site here. No matter how you read it, please be sure to review it wherever you can. That goes for all my books. Thank you for stopping by. Stay safe, happy, and healthy.

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New! The Red Dress

Copyright July 2019 by DLD Books

Front cover contains: young, dark-haired woman in red dress holding flowers

When Eve went to her high school senior prom, she wore a red dress that her mother had made for her. That night, after dancing with the boy of her dreams, she caught him in the act with her best friend. Months later, Eve, a freshman in college, is bullied into giving the dress to her roommate. After her mother finds out, their relationship is never the same again.

Twenty-five years later, Eve, a bestselling author, is happily married with three children. Although her mother suffers from dementia, she still remembers, and Eve still harbors the guilt for giving the dress away. When she receives a Facebook friend request from her old college roommate and an invitation to her twenty-five-year high school class reunion, then meets her former best friend by chance, she must confront the past in order to face the future.

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Books

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Adapting My Writing to Changing Times #OpenBookBlogHop #WednesdayWords

Image contains: Abbie, smiling.

Welcome to another edition of Open Book Blog Hop. This week’s question is: “WHY do you write what you write?”

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The answer is simple. I enjoy reading the type of material I write.

I like stories with believable characters and a plot that’s not too complicated or horrendous, with no violence, no explicit descriptions of sex, and not too much strong language. I like feel-good endings in which everything is resolved. I enjoy reading poetry that’s straightforward, not abstract, that doesn’t have unfamiliar words. I like memoirs to which I can relate that don’t portray a lot of atrocities.

I’m a sensitive reader. I don’t like books that make me feel uncomfortable.  So, I don’t want my readers to feel uncomfortable.

Recently, my editor at DLD Books pointed out a problem with a scene in my latest novel, Why Grandma Doesn’t Know Me, which is due out this fall. After having a bad dream, ten-year-old Sarah crawls into bed with her father, not realizing her mother isn’t there. My editor pointed out that ten-year-old girls aren’t known to do that anymore, and victims of sexual molestation or rape by a parent or other relative may feel uncomfortable reading this. Since I’ve never been a victim of such abuse, I’d never thought of it from that angle.

In the 1970’s, I often climbed into bed with my own father, and he read to me, or we listened to music or just slept. Back then, I’d never heard of adults abusing children in such a way.

I don’t want readers who were victims of such abuse to feel uncomfortable reading my books. Now that I think of it, I haven’t read many books where little girls curl up in bed with their fathers. So, I agreed to let my editor change the scene. It’ll be interesting to see what she does with it.

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How about you authors out there? Why do you write what you write? Have you needed to change a scene because you were afraid it would make someone uncomfortable? You can leave your answer in the comment field below or click here to participate in this week’s Open Book Blog Hop and read what others have to say.

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For those of you who use the National Library Service for the Blind and Print Disabled, The Red Dress is available for download from their site here. No matter how you read it, please be sure to review it wherever you can. That goes for all my books. Thank you for stopping by. Stay safe, happy, and healthy.

***

New! The Red Dress

Copyright July 2019 by DLD Books

Image contains: young, dark-haired woman in red dress holding flowers

When Eve went to her high school senior prom, she wore a red dress that her mother had made for her. That night, after dancing with the boy of her dreams, she caught him in the act with her best friend. Months later, Eve, a freshman in college, is bullied into giving the dress to her roommate. After her mother finds out, their relationship is never the same again.

Twenty-five years later, Eve, a bestselling author, is happily married with three children. Although her mother suffers from dementia, she still remembers, and Eve still harbors the guilt for giving the dress away. When she receives a Facebook friend request from her old college roommate and an invitation to her twenty-five-year high school class reunion, then meets her former best friend by chance, she must confront the past in order to face the future.

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Books

My Amazon Author Page

Facebook

Website

 

 

To Twist or Not to Twist #OpenBookBlogHop

Image contains: Abbie, smiling.

Welcome to another edition of Open Book Blog Hop. This week’s question is: “Plot twists…do you have a favorite you can talk about (yours or someone else’s?)”

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I had to ponder this. I can’t think of any favorite plot twists, either in my books or anyone else’s. After reading a couple of other bloggers’ responses, I realized that I don’t want to give away any plot twists. If someone is reading the book in question, she might not want to finish it if she knows about a particular plot twist. If she hasn’t started reading it, she may not bother opening it to the first page. If she hasn’t purchased the book yet…

I say let plot twists be a surprise. There’s nothing wrong with a synopsis that gives the reader a basic idea of the story, but don’t spoil it for readers by giving away plot twists. If you want to know about mine, I suggest you visit my website and check them out for yourself. Happy reading!

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If you’d like to participate in this week’s open Book Blog Hop, click here. Otherwise, please feel free to tell me what you think about plot twists in the comment field below.

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By the way, for those of you who use the National Library Service for the Blind and Print Disabled, The Red Dress is available for download from their site here. No matter how you read it, please be sure to review it wherever you can. That goes for all my books. Thank you for stopping by. Stay safe, happy, and healthy.

 

New! The Red Dress

Copyright July 2019 by DLD Books

Image contains: young, dark-haired woman in red dress holding flowers

When Eve went to her high school senior prom, she wore a red dress that her mother had made for her. That night, after dancing with the boy of her dreams, she caught him in the act with her best friend. Months later, Eve, a freshman in college, is bullied into giving the dress to her roommate. After her mother finds out, their relationship is never the same again.

Twenty-five years later, Eve, a bestselling author, is happily married with three children. Although her mother suffers from dementia, she still remembers, and Eve still harbors the guilt for giving the dress away. When she receives a Facebook friend request from her old college roommate and an invitation to her twenty-five-year high school class reunion, then meets her former best friend by chance, she must confront the past in order to face the future.

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Books

My Amazon Author Page

Facebook

Website