Any Regrets? #SixSentenceStoryThursdayLinkUp #Excerpts #Inspiration

Abbie wears a blue and white V-neck top with different shades of blue from sky to navy that swirl together with the white. She has short, brown hair and rosy cheeks and smiles at the camera against a black background.

Photo Courtesy of Tess Anderson Photography

 

 

Welcome to another edition of Six Sentence Story Thursday Link Up, in which the given word is “path.” Here’s a six-sentence excerpt from my latest novel, Why Grandma Doesn’t Know Me. Sixteen-year-old Natalie speculates on whether she was right to tell her parents about her biological father after finding out about him. Let’s see what she has to say.

***

Even if Grandma Sherman hadn’t told me about Bill Hadley, our paths would have crossed in Laramie. But no one would have known or suspected. Or would they? The reporter in the bookstore noticed a resemblance between Bill and me, so maybe the story had to come out sooner or later. Who knew?

I still felt sorry for my sister.

***

What bookstore and reporter is Natalie talking about? Why does she feel sorry for her sister? Read the book and find out.

Thanks to Girlie on the Edge for inspiring the above excerpt with her six-sentence story prompt for this week. You can click here to participate in this week’s hop and read other bloggers’ six-sentence creations.

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New! Why Grandma Doesn’t Know Me

Copyright 2021 by Abbie Johnson Taylor.

Independently published with the help of DLD Books.

The cover of the book features an older woman sitting in a wicker chair facing a window. The world beyond the window is bright, and several plants are visible on the terrace. Behind the woman’s chair is another plant, with a tall stalk and wide rounded leaves. The woman has short, white hair, glasses, a red sweater, and tan pants. The border of the picture is a taupe color and reads "Why Grandma Doesn't Know Me" above the photo and "Abbie Johnson Taylor" below it.

Sixteen-year-old Natalie’s grandmother, suffering from dementia and confined to a wheelchair, lives in a nursing home and rarely recognizes Natalie. But one Halloween night, she tells her a shocking secret that only she and Natalie’s mother know. Natalie is the product of a one-night stand between her mother, who is a college English teacher, and another professor.

After some research, Natalie learns that people with dementia often have vivid memories of past events. Still not wanting to believe what her grandmother has told her, she finds her biological father online. The resemblance between them is undeniable. Not knowing what else to do, she shows his photo and website to her parents.

Natalie realizes she has some growing up to do. Scared and confused, she reaches out to her biological father, and they start corresponding.

Her younger sister, Sarah, senses their parents’ marital difficulties. At Thanksgiving, when she has an opportunity to see Santa Claus, she asks him to bring them together again. Can the jolly old elf grant her request?

***

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I’m in the Paper #The Red Dress Publicity

hImage contains: Abbie, smiling.I was recently interviewed by Allyana Darrow, a reporter for my local newspaper, The Sheridan Press, about my new book, The Red Dress. She’s one of the most awesome journalists with whom I’ve worked. After the initial phone interview, she emailed me the introduction to her article, admitting she hadn’t yet read the book and asking me to check for accuracy. A couple of days later, she called with more questions. She was polite, and I really appreciate her attention to detail and in-depth questioning. Now, here’s a link to her article.

The Sheridan Press August 21st 2019

Don’t forget. I’ll be signing copies of The Red Dress tomorrow from 1-3 p.m. at Sheridan Stationery Books and Gallery, located at 206 North Main Street, Sheridan, Wyoming. If you live here or plan to be in the area, please stop by. I’d love to meet you.

 

New! The Red Dress: A Novel

Copyright July 2019 by DLD Books

Front cover contains: young, dark-haired woman in red dress holding flowers

When Eve went to her high school senior prom, she wore a red dress that her mother had made for her. That night, after dancing with the boy of her dreams, she caught him in the act with her best friend. Months later, Eve, a freshman in college, is bullied into giving the dress to her roommate. After her mother finds out, their relationship is never the same again.

Twenty-five years later, Eve, a bestselling author, is happily married with three children. Although her mother suffers from dementia, she still remembers, and Eve still harbors the guilt for giving the dress away. When she receives a Facebook friend request from her old college roommate and an invitation to her twenty-five-year high school class reunion, then meets her former best friend by chance, she must confront the past in order to face the future.

 

My Other Books

 

My Ideal Partner: How I Met, Married, and Cared for the Man I Loved Despite Debilitating Odds

Click to purchase My Ideal Partner from Smashwords absolutely free!

That’s Life: New and Selected Poems

How to Build a better Mousetrap: Recollections and Reflections of a Family Caregiver

We Shall Overcome

My Other Links

Visit my website.

Like me on Facebook.

 

Character Interview #The Red Dress

Image contains: Abbie, smiling.

My protagonist, Eve Barry Sawyer, is a best-selling author, married with three children, living in Colorado Springs. During one fateful summer, she must come to terms with her past in order to face the future. I sat down with her recently, and we had an interesting chat.

***

Me: Eve, I’m so glad you could take time away from your busy schedule to talk to me. Let’s start at the beginning. Where were you born and raised?

Eve: Well, I grew up in Fowler, but since the little town had no hospital, Dad had to drive Mother twenty-five miles to Pueblo. I was slow in coming, but Dad didn’t realize this. He told me later that he was afraid I’d be born in the car. Mother said that he drove so fast that she thought they would be killed before I could be born.

Me: You have no siblings, right?

Eve: No, Mother and Dad tried a few years after I was born. But she miscarried, and the doctor advised them not to try again.

Me: Your father ran a bookstore, and your mother was a librarian. So, did you develop an interest in books at an early age?

Eve: Oh, yes. Even before I learned to read, my parents took turns reading to me. My earliest memory is of Dad reading from A. A. Milne’s collections of Winnie-the-Pooh stories. Mother read me books like The Secret Garden by Frances Hodgson Burnett. I didn’t find that type of book nearly as exciting as animal stories. Later, much to Mother’s consternation, I read The Wizard of Oz and loved it! And of course, I was a Nancy Drew fan, and Mother didn’t like that, either. In my teen years, I read a lot of books by Judy Blume, and that’s how I became interested in writing young adult novels.

Me: It sounds like you were a regular customer at the bookstore and library.

Eve” Yes I was, especially when I was younger and couldn’t be left at home alone after school and on Saturdays. My parents took turns bringing me to work with them. Dad filled an old bathtub with pillows and put it in one corner of the store for children to lie in and read. That was my favorite spot. Of course, homework was a priority. But when that was done, I could lie in the tub and read all I wanted. The children’s section at the library, where Mother worked, wasn’t nearly as appealing. Finally, Mother let me go to the bookstore all the time when I wasn’t in school or with friends.

Me: Were you still a bookworm when you went to your high-school senior prom?

Eve: Yes. In fact, Trent and I were taking a science fiction class that year.

Me: Trent, the boy with whom you went to the prom, right?

Eve: Yes.

Me: Trent was into music, but he must have also liked science fiction.

Eve: He liked Star Wars and Star Trek, but when it came to reading books like Brave New World and 1984, the symbolism and other concepts our teacher wanted us to understand were over his head. Since the class met right before lunch, we usually walked to the cafeteria and ate together afterward, and I explained those things to him. Adelle often met us there, and we formed a threesome.

Me: So, was Adelle there when Trent asked you to go with him to the prom?

Eve: No. She was home with a bad cold that day. In the cafeteria, Trent and I found an empty table in the corner, and he asked me.

Me: Did you know right away you wanted to go with him, or did you have to think about it?

Eve: I liked Trent, despite his lack of understanding or appreciation of literature, and he was great on the football field and played the guitar and sang pretty well. I didn’t think anyone else would ask me, so I said yes right away. Then a few days later, Kent asked me. I felt sorry for him. He was shy back then. I suggested he ask Adelle, but I don’t think he did.

Me: Apparently not, since Adelle didn’t seem to have a date for the prom.

Eve: No. She came by herself. She said she was fine with it and that she loved watching Trent and me dance to “Lady in Red.” Maybe I should have seen it coming, but Adelle and I had been best friends since first grade. I never dreamed she would do what she did later. That’s why it was such a shock when I found them together in the back seat of Trent’s car.

Me: And you didn’t speak to Adelle again until twenty-five years later after you received that invitation to your high-school class reunion?

Eve: No. She got pregnant that night, and she and Trent eloped to Los Vegas.

Me: What about Charlene, the roommate who bullied you into giving her the dress your mother made for your senior prom. Did you know her before you two were in college together?

Eve: No, she came from Sheridan, Wyoming. She was only there one semester. She got pregnant the night she wore my dress to the homecoming dance.

Me: That’s too bad. So, how did you meet your husband Greg?

Eve: I was teaching a creative writing class at the college in Colorado Springs. He was teaching English at the Colorado State School for the Blind and needed ideas for a similar class.

Me: Was it love at first sight?

Eve: I wouldn’t say that, but when he walked into the classroom, I was so distracted by his tall figure that the only thing I could think to say was, “Are you descended from Tom Sawyer in Mark Twain’s book?” It’s been a joke between us ever since.

Me: So, naturally, you named your only son Tom.

Eve: Well, we called him Thomas at first, but after Greg read him and his sisters the book, he decided he liked the name Tom better.

Me: Tom was really into baseball. Did he or his sisters, like you, ever take an interest in reading?

Eve: Ashely, my middle child did, but for Julie, the oldest, it was about having fun and being with friends until, of course, the summer I went to my twenty-fifth high-school class reunion.

Me: Well, this is quite a story. Thank you again for taking time to share it with me.

Eve: Oh, don’t thank me. Thank the woman in the memoir writing workshop you attended, who had a similar story about a red blouse.

Me: Unfortunately, I can’t. Like your mother, she’s in a nursing home with dementia. She probably doesn’t remember participating in the workshop.

***

Do you have a question for Eve. If so, please leave it in the comment field, and she’ll answer it as soon as she can. We both look forward to hearing from you.

 

New! The Red Dress: A Novel

Copyright July 2019 by DLD Books

Front cover contains: young, dark-haired woman in red dress holding flowers

When Eve went to her high school senior prom, she wore a red dress that her mother had made for her. That night, after dancing with the boy of her dreams, she caught him in the act with her best friend. Months later, Eve, a freshman in college, is bullied into giving the dress to her roommate. After her mother finds out, their relationship is never the same again.

Twenty-five years later, Eve, a bestselling author, is happily married with three children. Although her mother suffers from dementia, she still remembers, and Eve still harbors the guilt for giving the dress away. When she receives a Facebook friend request from her old college roommate and an invitation to her twenty-five-year high school class reunion, then meets her former best friend by chance, she must confront the past in order to face the future.

 

My Other Books

 

My Ideal Partner: How I Met, Married, and Cared for the Man I Loved Despite Debilitating Odds

Click to purchase My Ideal Partner from Smashwords absolutely free!

That’s Life: New and Selected Poems

How to Build a better Mousetrap: Recollections and Reflections of a Family Caregiver

We Shall Overcome

My Other Links

Visit my website.

Like me on Facebook.

 

 

 

Review: The Readers of Broken Wheel Recommend

Abbie-1

The Readers of Broken Wheel Recommend

by Katarina Bivald

Copyright 2016.

 

Sara and Amy develop a long distance friendship with books as something they have in common. Sara lives in Sweden, and Amy lives in Broken Wheel, Iowa, a small town ravaged by hard economic times. After two years of correspondence, Amy invites Sara to visit. When Sara loses her job in a Swedish bookstore, she accepts. However, when she arrives in Broken Wheel, she learns that Amy has passed away.

The inhabitants of the town take Sara in, and she opens a bookstore, and the people fall in love with her. When her tourist visa threatens to run out, they devise a plot to marry her off to one of Broken Wheel’s eligible bachelors so she can obtain permanent residency. A cast of zany characters including an immigration official, two homosexual bartenders, and an eccentric old woman with a hunting rifle create a hilarious, interesting, yet satisfying ending.

As the story unfolds, letters Amy wrote to Sara in Sweden are interspersed throughout the narrative, told from Sara’s and other characters’ points of view. The recording I heard of this book, produced by Random House Audio, had two female narrators- one with an American accent, who read Amy’s letters, and one with a British accent, who read the rest of the narrative. The British narrator did a pretty good job of portraying Iowa accents, but I think it might have been better if the American narrator read parts of the narrative from points of view of the people of Broken Wheel. In any case, this reader of Sheridan, Wyoming, recommends this book.

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Author Abbie Johnson Taylor

We Shall Overcome

How to Build a Better Mousetrap: Recollections and Reflections of a Family Caregiver

That’s Life: New and Selected Poems

My Ideal Partner: How I Met, Married, and Cared for the Man I Loved Despite Debilitating Odds

Click to hear an audio trailer.

Like me on Facebook.

 

Scent Story (Poetry)

The store smelled of new books.

As an excited girl of twelve or thirteen,

I made my way to the Nancy Drew section,

already in the convertible with Nancy and her friends.

Forty years later,

in a toilet stall at the YMCA,

The tissue’s scent takes me back to a time

when I couldn’t wait to get home and read.

***

In a recent post at https://alice13wordwalk.wordpress.com/2015/11/04/a-cornucopia-of-thanks-for-libraries/ , Alice Massa, a retired teacher and poet, shares her memories of the libraries she frequented over the years. Like me, she loved to sniff a book’s interior as a child. That reminded me of the above poem which I wrote years ago after noticing that a piece of toilet paper at the YMCA smelled just like the inside of a new Nancy Drew book. To hear me read this poem, go to https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/15213189/scent%20story.mp3 .

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Abbie J. Taylor 010Author Abbie Johnson Taylor

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Cover: How to Build a Better Mousetrap by Abbie Johnson TaylorHow to Build a Better Mousetrap: Recollections and Reflections of a Family Caregiver

That’s Life: New and Selected Poems

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