What’s On My Desk? #MondayMusings #OpenBookBlogHop #Inspiration

Abbie wears a blue and white V-neck top with different shades of blue from sky to navy that swirl together with the white. She has short, brown hair and rosy cheeks and smiles at the camera against a black background.

Photo Courtesy of Tess Anderson Photography

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by Two Pentacles Publishing.

 

 

Welcome to another edition of Open Book Blog Hop. This week’s question is: “What are 5 must-have things you keep on your desk, and how do you use them?”

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  1. My computer. This is an all-in-one unit with monitor and speakers. It’s equipped with text-to-speech software that reads everything on the screen to me and tells me what I’m typing. It also helps me navigate with the keyboard instead of the mouse.
  2. My Braille Display. Working in conjunction with the text-to-speech software on my computer, this device makes it a lot easier to proofread and edit my work,. With cursor routing keys, I can navigate directly to a misspelled word or a word or phrase I want to change. Not only does this device connect to my PC and iPhone, it also has a basic text editor, allowing me to make notes, and I can download books from several online services. With its own text-to-speech software, I can either listen to books being read to me or read them in Braille.
  3. My Printer/Scanner. This is pretty self-explanatory. I use it to scan and print documents when necessary.
  4. My Closed-Circuit Television Reading System. This is a bit more complex. It consists of a monitor with camera with a movable table underneath. When I place a document on the table, the camera enlarges the print, so I can read it. I use this to read mail and write checks. In my younger years, I read books with it. Now, my eyes get tired after reading for long periods of time.
  5. My iPhone. This also comes with text-to speech software that is available to anyone purchasing such a device. Simply go to your settings, to accessibility, then Voiceover, and turn it on. If your phone has a home button, which mine does, you can press it three times to toggle it on and off. You can also ask Siri to turn it on and off. While working at my desk, I only use the phone to make and receive calls and send and receive text messages.

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How about you? What five must-have things are on your desk, and how do you use them? You can click here to participate in this week’s hop and read other bloggers’ responses.

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New! Why Grandma Doesn’t Know Me

Copyright 2021 by Abbie Johnson Taylor.

Independently published with the help of DLD Books.

The cover of the book features an older woman sitting in a wicker chair facing a window. The world beyond the window is bright, and several plants are visible on the terrace. Behind the woman’s chair is another plant, with a tall stalk and wide rounded leaves. The woman has short, white hair, glasses, a red sweater, and tan pants. The border of the picture is a taupe color and reads "Why Grandma Doesn't Know Me" above the photo and "Abbie Johnson Taylor" below it.

Sixteen-year-old Natalie’s grandmother, suffering from dementia and confined to a wheelchair, lives in a nursing home and rarely recognizes Natalie. But one Halloween night, she tells her a shocking secret that only she and Natalie’s mother know. Natalie is the product of a one-night stand between her mother, who is a college English teacher, and another professor.

After some research, Natalie learns that people with dementia often have vivid memories of past events. Still not wanting to believe what her grandmother has told her, she finds her biological father online. The resemblance between them is undeniable. Not knowing what else to do, she shows his photo and website to her parents.

Natalie realizes she has some growing up to do. Scared and confused, she reaches out to her biological father, and they start corresponding.

Her younger sister, Sarah, senses their parents’ marital difficulties. At Thanksgiving, when she has an opportunity to see Santa Claus, she asks him to bring them together again. Can the jolly old elf grant her request?

***

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My Favorite Writing Tools #MondayMusings #OpenBookBlogHop #Inspiration

Image contains: Abbie, smiling.

 

 

 

Welcome to another edition of Open Book Blog Hop. This week’s question is: “We talked about the tools we use for our blogs awhile back. How about for your writing in general? What are your favorite tools?”

I can imagine how writers like Ernest Hemmingway and John Steinbeck did their jobs without modern technology. They must have rewritten their manuscripts umpteen million times until they were perfect. Nowadays, with the help of such features as copy and paste, it’s so much easier to correct spelling and grammar mistakes, change words, and even move scenes from one place to another or delete them altogether.

I enjoy utilizing today’s technology in my writing. Because of my visual impairment, I use text-to-speech software on my computer that reads everything on the screen, tells me what I’m typing, and helps me navigate with a keyboard instead of a mouse. I also have a Braille display connected to my PC, which I find more efficient when editing. Sometimes, I like to write while sitting in my recliner, using a Braille notetaker. Most of this technology has been with me through the publication of six books and the inclusion of many short stories, poems, and nonfiction pieces in various publications. I hope it stays with me for a long, long time.

How about you writers out there? What are your favorite tools? You can respond in the comment field below or click here to participate in this week’s hop and read what other bloggers have to say.

 

New! Why Grandma Doesn’t Know Me

Copyright 2021 by Abbie Johnson Taylor.

Independently published with the help of DLD Books.

Front cover image contains: elderly woman in red sweater sitting next to a window.

Sixteen-year-old Natalie’s grandmother, suffering from dementia and confined to a wheelchair, lives in a nursing home and rarely recognizes Natalie. But one Halloween night, she tells her a shocking secret that only she and Natalie’s mother know. Natalie is the product of a one-night stand between her mother, who is a college English teacher, and another professor.

After some research, Natalie learns that people with dementia often have vivid memories of past events. Still not wanting to believe what her grandmother has told her, she finds her biological father online. The resemblance between them is undeniable. Not knowing what else to do, she shows his photo and website to her parents.

Natalie realizes she has some growing up to do. Scared and confused, she reaches out to her biological father, and they start corresponding.

Her younger sister, Sarah, senses their parents’ marital difficulties. At Thanksgiving, when she has an opportunity to see Santa Claus, she asks him to bring them together again. Can the jolly old elf grant her request?

***

Books

My Amazon Author Page

Facebook

Website

 

 

 

Three Read-Throughs and You’re Out #OpenBookBlogHop #Inspiration #WritingPrompts

Image contains: Abbie, smiling.

Welcome to another edition of Open Book Blog Hop. This week’s question is: “What part of writing are you best at? Not compared to everyone else, but compared to you?”

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Well, I think I do editing best. Now, you may wonder how that could be true for someone like me with a visual impairment. I’ll tell you. I use Braille. When editing, I can use a Braille display to more efficiently correct mistakes and make changes. I must admit I don’t always catch every mistake, but who does? I know writers with good vision who still have errors in their work. Nobody’s perfect.

Of course, you can edit and edit and edit till the cows come home, and you won’t get anything published. So, since my late husband was a baseball fan, I use the three-strikes-and-you’re-out rule. I go through something at least three times before I think it’s ready to be submitted. But even after I’ve published something, I find places where I could have written it better. It has to stop somewhere, though.

How about you authors out there? What part of your job do you do best? You can click here to participate in this week’s hop and read what other bloggers have to say.

 

New! Why Grandma Doesn’t Know Me

Copyright 2021 by Abbie Johnson Taylor.

Independently published with the help of DLD Books.

Front cover image contains: elderly woman in red sweater sitting next to a window.

Sixteen-year-old Natalie’s grandmother, suffering from dementia and confined to a wheelchair, lives in a nursing home and rarely recognizes Natalie. But one Halloween night, she tells her a shocking secret that only she and Natalie’s mother know. Natalie is the product of a one-night stand between her mother, who is a college English teacher, and another professor.

After some research, Natalie learns that people with dementia often have vivid memories of past events. Still not wanting to believe what her grandmother has told her, she finds her biological father online. The resemblance between them is undeniable. Not knowing what else to do, she shows his photo and website to her parents.

Natalie realizes she has some growing up to do. Scared and confused, she reaches out to her biological father, and they start corresponding.

Her younger sister, Sarah, senses their parents’ marital difficulties. At Thanksgiving, when she has an opportunity to see Santa Claus, she asks him to bring them together again. Can the jolly old elf grant her request?

***

Books

My Amazon Author Page

Facebook

Website