Giving Thanks for Time #TuesdayTidbit #Jottings #Inspiration

Last week, I was complaining to myself for having so much to do and not enough time. Then, I got the dreaded phone call, a call I’d received several times before, a call that meant deleting every event on my calendar that didn’t take place virtually. I had once again been exposed to COVID. This time, one of the gals in my singing group had tested positive after attending our last practice.

This meant I had all the time in the world, but I felt depressed. We’d been having lovely weather, and I’d been looking forward to eating lunch at the senior center and taking walks.

I’d planned to get my COVID booster on Friday. I called to ask if I should still do that or wait. The receptionist told me to wait at least a week. This I was glad to do, since I’d suddenly realized I could possibly infect the transit driver who would take me there.

On a whim, I asked the gal at the public health department if it would be okay to take a walk if I didn’t have any symptoms, wore a mask, and did my best to distance myself from anyone I encountered. What she said surprised me. “Since you’re vaccinated, you don’t have to quarantine.”

Seriously? It was my understanding that even if I was fully vaccinated, I could still pass the virus on to someone else, even if I didn’t have symptoms. What’s more, I wasn’t fully vaccinated, technically, since I hadn’t yet had my booster. After giving the matter some thought, I decided it would be okay to take my walks for exercise while wearing a mask and keeping my distance. If I developed symptoms, I would stay home.

Now, it’s been over a week since I was exposed. I’ve survived yet another COVID scare. What I’ve learned is this. Instead of griping about having too much to do and not enough time, I should prioritize and do what I can in the time allotted and not worry about what doesn’t get done. That’s better than having “Too Much Time on My Hands.”

New! Why Grandma Doesn’t Know Me

Copyright 2021 by Abbie Johnson Taylor.

Independently published with the help of DLD Books.

The cover of the book features an older woman sitting in a wicker chair facing a window. The world beyond the window is bright, and several plants are visible on the terrace. Behind the woman’s chair is another plant, with a tall stalk and wide rounded leaves. The woman has short, white hair, glasses, a red sweater, and tan pants. The border of the picture is a taupe color and reads "Why Grandma Doesn't Know Me" above the photo and "Abbie Johnson Taylor" below it.

Sixteen-year-old Natalie’s grandmother, suffering from dementia and confined to a wheelchair, lives in a nursing home and rarely recognizes Natalie. But one Halloween night, she tells her a shocking secret that only she and Natalie’s mother know. Natalie is the product of a one-night stand between her mother, who is a college English teacher, and another professor.

After some research, Natalie learns that people with dementia often have vivid memories of past events. Still not wanting to believe what her grandmother has told her, she finds her biological father online. The resemblance between them is undeniable. Not knowing what else to do, she shows his photo and website to her parents.

Natalie realizes she has some growing up to do. Scared and confused, she reaches out to her biological father, and they start corresponding.

Her younger sister, Sarah, senses their parents’ marital difficulties. At Thanksgiving, when she has an opportunity to see Santa Claus, she asks him to bring them together again. Can the jolly old elf grant her request?

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A photo of Abbie smiling in front of a white background. Her brown hair is cut short and frames her face. She is wearing a bright red shirt and a dark, flowy scarf swirled with hues of purple, pinks and blues.

 

Sheltering in Place Again #Six-SentenceStoryThursdayLinkUp #Inspiration #WritingPrompts

Image contains: Abbie, smiling.

 

 

 

Last Friday, I was on route to my singing engagement at an assisted living facility when I received a phone call from Help at Home, the agency that provides my housekeeping and blood pressure monitoring services. Apparently, one of their workers may have exposed me to COVID19. Needless to say, I called the assisted living facility and canceled my gig, then went straight home.

Assuming I was exposed the previous Tuesday when the workers cleaned my house and took my blood pressure, I notified everyone I’d been with since then. I also called the YMCA, where I teach water exercise classes. The recommended time for sheltering in place is now five to seven days, and because I haven’t had any symptoms since I was exposed, I believe I’m in the clear.

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Thanks to Girlie on the Edge for inspiring the above true story with her six-sentence story prompt for this week, in which the given word is “shelter.” You can click here to participate and read other bloggers’ six-sentence creations.

 

New! Why Grandma Doesn’t Know Me

Copyright 2021 by Abbie Johnson Taylor.

Independently published with the help of DLD Books.

Front cover image contains: elderly woman in red sweater sitting next to a window.

Sixteen-year-old Natalie’s grandmother, suffering from dementia and confined to a wheelchair, lives in a nursing home and rarely recognizes Natalie. But one Halloween night, she tells her a shocking secret that only she and Natalie’s mother know. Natalie is the product of a one-night stand between her mother, who is a college English teacher, and another professor.

After some research, Natalie learns that people with dementia often have vivid memories of past events. Still not wanting to believe what her grandmother has told her, she finds her biological father online. The resemblance between them is undeniable. Not knowing what else to do, she shows his photo and website to her parents.

Natalie realizes she has some growing up to do. Scared and confused, she reaches out to her biological father, and they start corresponding.

Her younger sister, Sarah, senses their parents’ marital difficulties. At Thanksgiving, when she has an opportunity to see Santa Claus, she asks him to bring them together again. Can the jolly old elf grant her request?

***

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Life is good. It is snowing. Enjoying Elderhood. #WordPressWednesday #Reblogs #Inspiration

Image contains: Abbie, smiling.

 

Fellow author and blogger Glenda Beall has been recuperating from COVID while visiting her sister and brother-in-law. In this post, she shares her experiences and recommends an interesting book. Enjoy!

 

Here I am recovering from COVID and watching the snow falling beautifully. I have survived the virus thanks to having been vaccinated and having taken a booster shot. Gay, Stu, and I tested negative tonight and I am so relieved. With Gay taking care of me and being with me so much, I have been afraid she would catch it, but she has had her shots, too.

 

Read the full post here.