Smorgasbord Christmas Book Fair 2022 – #Memoir #Cancer Miriam Hurdle, #Romance Ritu Bhathal, #Crimethriller Carol Balawyder#SaturdaySurprise #Reblogs #Inspiration

If you’re looking for last-minute holiday gifts, check out the books featured in this post I’m sharing from Sally Cronin. You can click here to read my review of The Winding Road: A Journey of Survival by Miriam Hurdle, which is one of the books mentioned. Enjoy, and happy holidays!

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Welcome to the Smorgasbord Christmas Book Fair with a selection of books from personally recommended authors on my bookshelf I believe will make wonderful gifts for friends, family and for you.

 

Read the full post.

 

Abbie wears a blue and white V-neck top with different shades of blue from sky to navy that swirl together with the white. She has short, brown hair and rosy cheeks and smiles at the camera against a black background.

Photo Courtesy of Tess Anderson Photography

Photo Resize and Description by

Two Pentacles Publishing.

 

I’m pleased to announce that from now until January 1st, Why Grandma Doesn’t Know Me, The Red Dress, and My Ideal Partner are ABSOLUTELY FREE from Smashwords as part of its 6th annual end-of-year sale. Please visit my Smashwords author page to learn more.

If you haven’t already done so, please subscribe to my email list to receive my twice-yearly newsletter and other announcements. This is a one-way announcements list, meaning the only messages you’ll receive will come from me. So, you can rest assured that this list is low-traffic. Send a blank email to:  newsfrommycorner+subscribe@groups.io  You’ll receive a confirmation email. Reply to that with another blank message, and you should be good to go.

 

New! Why Grandma Doesn’t Know Me

Copyright 2021 by Abbie Johnson Taylor.

Independently published with the help of DLD Books.

The cover of the book features an older woman sitting in a wicker chair facing a window. The world beyond the window is bright, and several plants are visible on the terrace. Behind the woman’s chair is another plant, with a tall stalk and wide rounded leaves. The woman has short, white hair, glasses, a red sweater, and tan pants. The border of the picture is a taupe color and reads "Why Grandma Doesn't Know Me" above the photo and "Abbie Johnson Taylor" below it.Photo Resize and Description by

Two Pentacles Publishing.

 

Sixteen-year-old Natalie’s grandmother, suffering from dementia and confined to a wheelchair, lives in a nursing home and rarely recognizes Natalie. But one Halloween night, she tells her a shocking secret that only she and Natalie’s mother know. Natalie is the product of a one-night stand between her mother, who is a college English teacher, and another professor.

After some research, Natalie learns that people with dementia often have vivid memories of past events. Still not wanting to believe what her grandmother has told her, she finds her biological father online. The resemblance between them is undeniable. Not knowing what else to do, she shows his photo and website to her parents.

Natalie realizes she has some growing up to do. Scared and confused, she reaches out to her biological father, and they start corresponding.

Her younger sister, Sarah, senses their parents’ marital difficulties. At Thanksgiving, when she has an opportunity to see Santa Claus, she asks him to bring them together again. Can the jolly old elf grant her request?

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Christmas Bowl #Tuesday Tidbit, #Essay

Image contains: Abbie, smiling.As a kid, I was forced to try a variety of sports in school. Due in part to my visual impairment, I wasn’t successful at any of them. I either fell on my face or was hit in the nose with a ball. But in college, I found a sport I could do pretty well, despite the visual impairment, and without injury.

In 1981, I was entering my second year at Sheridan College in Sheridan, Wyoming. I was required to take at least two semesters of physical education. I signed up for bowling because to me, that seemed to require the least amount of athletic ability, and the chance of injury was slim.

The first few days of class were humiliating. I found that no matter what I did, the ball always ended up in the gutter. Fortunately, nobody laughed at me, which they would have done in elementary school. But between frames, I watched other students bowl strikes and spares and heard them cheering for one another and was depressed by the realization that no one was cheering for me.

The instructor saw that I was floundering and tossed me a lifeline. She arranged for me to have a lane all to myself, so I  would have an opportunity to practice continually without having to wait my turn. She also worked with me to perfect my arm movement, so I could aim the ball right down the center of the lane.

Gradually, I improved. My gutter balls became less and less frequent, and I hit more and more pins. One day, I finally bowled a strike, and the alley reverberated with the cheers of my classmates.

By the time the holidays rolled around, my average score was seventy-six. I loved bowling and wanted to practice in order to improve my game. I even watched the professional tour on television.

I was living at home at the time. Since I couldn’t drive, it was impossible for me to borrow the car and drive out to the bowling alley whenever I wanted. So, I constantly begged my parents to take me bowling, which they readily agreed to do most of the time. We would often go as a family, with my younger brother Andy tagging along. At Thanksgiving, when my uncle, aunt, and cousins from out of town were visiting, I even talked them into bowling with us, and we all had a wonderful time!

As Christmas grew closer, I became somewhat depressed, as I realized that the bowling class wouldn’t continue the second semester. I had really come to enjoy it and wondered if I would ever bowl again once the term ended. Then, to my wondering eyes on Christmas morning, there appeared a bowling ball, a pair of shoes, and a bag in which to carry them. Santa Claus even brought me an electronic bowling game. My parents realized that I was serious about this sport, just as Andy had been serious about tennis a few years earlier.

Through the years, I continued to bowl, although not as frequently, due to having other interests and obligations. One year, I joined a team on a ladies’ bowling league. We only bowled a few times, and the team finally broke up due to lack of interest. I offered my services to another team captain I knew, but I was never called. Perhaps my seventy-six average didn’t make me league material.

Now, although I still have the bag with the ball and shoes, I haven’t bowled in years. But I still have the memory of that seventy-six bowling average. That was one of the best Christmas presents I ever received.

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The above essay is in response to Dr. Crystal Grimes’ holiday blogging party, in which you can participate here. This essay was published years ago in Christmas in the Country, an anthology of work by disabled authors. It has since been revised.

By the way, for those of you who use the National Library Service for the Blind and Print Disabled, The Red Dress is available for download from their site here. No matter how you read it, please be sure to review it wherever you can. That goes for all my books. Thank you for stopping by. Stay safe, happy, and healthy.

New! The Red Dress

Copyright July 2019 by DLD Books

Front cover contains: young, dark-haired woman in red dress holding flowers

When Eve went to her high school senior prom, she wore a red dress that her mother had made for her. That night, after dancing with the boy of her dreams, she caught him in the act with her best friend. Months later, Eve, a freshman in college, is bullied into giving the dress to her roommate. After her mother finds out, their relationship is never the same again.

Twenty-five years later, Eve, a bestselling author, is happily married with three children. Although her mother suffers from dementia, she still remembers, and Eve still harbors the guilt for giving the dress away. When she receives a Facebook friend request from her old college roommate and an invitation to her twenty-five-year high school class reunion, then meets her former best friend by chance, she must confront the past in order to face the future.

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The Earring Debacle #Wednesday Words

When I was thirteen years old, I couldn’t get motivated to do much reading on my own, due to my visual impairment. I preferred to have my mother read to me instead. One book we read together was about a Jewish family in New York who had five girls and one boy. It was part of a series that I believe was called All of a Kind.

One of the girls in the story, who was my age, had her ears pierced. I found this process horrifying and vowed no jeweler would stick my earlobes with a needle just so I could wear earrings. Mother must have thought otherwise, for on the afternoon of Christmas Eve, she bundled my younger brother and me into the car, telling us we needed to do an errand. When I asked her where we were going, she said, “You’ll see.”

At the time, I’d requested, for Christmas, an electric chord organ I’d seen in a department store. So, I thought we were going to purchase it, but how would we get it home in our Mercedes Benz? As Mother pulled into a parking space downtown, she said, “Well, Andy, shall we tell her?”

“Yeah!” my younger brother answered.

Turning to me, as I sat next to her in the front seat, Mother said, “You’re going to get your ears pierced today.”

I was mortified. The last thing I wanted was to have my ears pierced. But I’d been raised to be appreciative of gifts, even when I didn’t want them. So, what could I say?

The jewelry store was packed with exuberant children and harried adults, doing their last-minute Christmas shopping, but I was far from happy. The woman who finally took us into a back room must have been reading my mind because she said, “Hon, are you sure you want to do this?”

I could have said no, but Mother would have gotten mad, and Andy would have called me a chicken. So, I pasted a smile on my face and said yes.

After applying plenty of alcohol to both my earlobes, she did it with a sort of hole-puncher that inserted earrings. It hurt a lot! In order for the holes to stay open, I needed to wear these earrings for at least six months. They had to be turned and alcohol applied to my lobes several times a day, and my earlobes were sore at times. Mother bought me pair after pair of earrings, which I reluctantly but diligently wore. In school, I was envied by other girls who didn’t have pierced ears.

Eventually, my ears became infected, and I had to let them close over, much to my relief and Mother’s consternation. By the way, I did get that electric chord organ for Christmas, and it was one of the best gifts I’d ever received. Now, besides the piano, I had one more instrument I could play.

How about you? What was the worst Christmas present you ever received? Thanks to blogger Stevie Turner for inspiring this. She also asks what was the worst gift you ever gave. I can’t think of any, but maybe you can. If so, you can share your memories in the comment field below or click here to participate in Stevie’s blog hop.

Please note that for the next few days, I’ll be taking a staycation to celebrate Thanksgiving. This means there will be no posts either here or on Facebook Thursday, Friday, Saturday, or Sunday. If you’re in the United States, I hope you have a safe and happy holiday, and will see you back here Monday.

By the way, for those of you who use the National Library Services for the Blind and Print Disabled, The Red Dress is available for download from their site here. No matter how you read it, please be sure to review it wherever you can. That goes for all my books. Thank you for stopping by. Stay safe, happy, and healthy.

New! The Red Dress

Copyright July 2019 by DLD Books

Front cover contains: young, dark-haired woman in red dress holding flowers

When Eve went to her high school senior prom, she wore a red dress that her mother had made for her. That night, after dancing with the boy of her dreams, she caught him in the act with her best friend. Months later, Eve, a freshman in college, is bullied into giving the dress to her roommate. After her mother finds out, their relationship is never the same again.

Twenty-five years later, Eve, a bestselling author, is happily married with three children. Although her mother suffers from dementia, she still remembers, and Eve still harbors the guilt for giving the dress away. When she receives a Facebook friend request from her old college roommate and an invitation to her twenty-five-year high school class reunion, then meets her former best friend by chance, she must confront the past in order to face the future.

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Image contains: Abbie, smiling.