Over the Bridge and Along the Creek #Musical Monday

Today, I would like to sing, for you, a parody I wrote of a familiar song we associate with this time of year. When I was single, I often walked from my apartment to my grandmother’s house for holiday meals and other occasions. My route took me across a bridge and along a cement walking path that meandered next to a creek. Hence, the song.

I wrote two verses: one from the perspective of a cane user, which I am, and one from the viewpoint of a guide dog user, which I’ve never been. I know plenty of guide dog users, though. Enjoy, and have a safe and happy Thanksgiving!

By the way, for those of you who use the National Library Services for the Blind and Print Disabled, The Red Dress is available for download from their site here. No matter how you read it, please be sure to review it wherever you can. That goes for all my books. Thank you for stopping by. Stay safe, happy, and healthy.

New! The Red Dress

Copyright July 2019 by DLD Books

Front cover contains: young, dark-haired woman in red dress holding flowers

When Eve went to her high school senior prom, she wore a red dress that her mother had made for her. That night, after dancing with the boy of her dreams, she caught him in the act with her best friend. Months later, Eve, a freshman in college, is bullied into giving the dress to her roommate. After her mother finds out, their relationship is never the same again.

Twenty-five years later, Eve, a bestselling author, is happily married with three children. Although her mother suffers from dementia, she still remembers, and Eve still harbors the guilt for giving the dress away. When she receives a Facebook friend request from her old college roommate and an invitation to her twenty-five-year high school class reunion, then meets her former best friend by chance, she must confront the past in order to face the future.

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A Puppy to the Rescue #Open Book Blog Hop

This week’s question from blogger Stevie Turner is this. Have you ever written yourself into a corner? My answer is yes.

In my young adult novel-in-progress, Grandma Doesn’t Know Me, an elderly woman in a nursing home, who suffers from dementia, unexpectedly reveals a family secret to her teen-aged granddaughter. In shock, the granddaughter tells her parents she knows the secret. This causes a rift in her parents’ marriage. Then, the grandmother dies. At this point, I knew where I wanted to go but had no idea how to get there, that is, until Squeakers showed up.

I suddenly got the idea to have my characters find an abandoned black and white Dalmatian puppy while walking in the park on a cold November morning. My ten-year-old, Sarah, dubs him Squeakers because he’s doing what most puppies would do in this situation, whine piteously. Squeakers manages to bring the family together during this time of grief, but only for a short time until the next tragedy strikes.

I’m not sure when this novel will be published, since I’m still writing it. But as soon as it’s available, I’ll let you know. So, stay tuned.

Meanwhile, from now until July 31st, you can download My Ideal Partner and The Red Dress absolutely free from Smashwords as part of its annual summer/winter sale. Click here to visit my Smashwords author page.

Also, for those of you who use the National Library Services for the Blind and Print Disabled, The Red Dress is available for download from their site here. Thank you for reading. Stay safe, happy, and healthy.

New! The Red Dress

Copyright July 2019 by DLD Books

Front cover contains: young, dark-haired woman in red dress holding flowers

When Eve went to her high school senior prom, she wore a red dress that her mother had made for her. That night, after dancing with the boy of her dreams, she caught him in the act with her best friend. Months later, Eve, a freshman in college, is bullied into giving the dress to her roommate. After her mother finds out, their relationship is never the same again.

Twenty-five years later, Eve, a bestselling author, is happily married with three children. Although her mother suffers from dementia, she still remembers, and Eve still harbors the guilt for giving the dress away. When she receives a Facebook friend request from her old college roommate and an invitation to her twenty-five-year high school class reunion, then meets her former best friend by chance, she must confront the past in order to face the future.

***

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My Amazon Author Page

Facebook

WebsiteImage contains: Abbie, smiling.

 

Re-Blog: Ida Matilda’s Cream Pitcher

Image contains: Abbie, smiling.In celebration of National Poetry Month, I’ll try to post a poem a day for the next thirty days. Most poems will be by others, but when I have time, I’ll post one of my own.

Lynda’s delightful poem should bring back pleasant memories of your own grandmother. If it does, please feel free to share them, either here or on Lynda’s blog. Enjoy, and happy National  Poetry Month.

 

Ida Matilda’s Cream Pitcher

 

My Books

 

My Ideal Partner: How I Met, Married, and Cared for the Man I Loved Despite Debilitating Odds

That’s Life: New and Selected Poems

How to Build a better Mousetrap: Recollections and Reflections of a Family Caregiver

We Shall Overcome

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Maroon Dream

I posted this poem here five years ago but am re-blogging it in response to a daily prompt. It was published in Serendipity Poets Journal in 2013. You can click below to hear me read it.

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https://soundcloud.com/user-91961896/maroon-dream/s-i0YUt

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Maroon Dream

As a teen-ager, I loved Grandma’s maroon Cadillac,

its soft, red velvet seats,

automatic windows, stereo speakers,

longed to take the wheel,

cruise up and down Main Street, radio blasting,

have fun fun fun till my granny took the caddy away.

I could never hold the wheel,

put the pedal to the medal.

With eyes that only saw objects and people up close in color,

I could only sit in the passenger seat

while Grandma negotiated the roads,

as we drove to the movies

or to the park for ice cream.

Through the years,

Grandma’s driving became more cautious, less certain.

Eventually, she sat in the passenger seat, said nothing

while I rode in back—

Dad drove us to restaurants or the theater.

When Grandma left this world,

her car and other possessions were sold.

Someone else drives her maroon Cadillac,

lucky to have such a car.

***

Who first taught you how to drive? Did you ever cruise Main Street?

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Author Abbie Johnson Taylor

We Shall Overcome

How to Build a Better Mousetrap: Recollections and Reflections of a Family Caregiver

That’s Life: New and Selected Poems

My Ideal Partner: How I Met, Married, and Cared for the Man I Loved Despite Debilitating Odds

Click to hear an audio trailer.

Like me on Facebook.

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Radio in the Morning

In a recent guest post, Lynda McKinney Lambert featured a poem about her grandmother’s ivory cream pitcher. This inspired me to revise and re-post a poem I wrote a couple of years ago about one of my grandmother’s rituals and how I still carry it out today. Click below to hear me read the poem and sing the John Denver song that inspired it.

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RADIO IN THE MORNING

 

“It’s a good day,” the announcer sang.

“Now, stand by for news.”

At the age of twelve, lying next to Grandma

in her big double bed, I asked her

why we had to listen to news.

She said it was necessary to know

what was going on in the world.

After local and national events,

sports, horoscopes, we began our day.

 

In my own room at home, I had a radio,

woke up to all the happenings

around town, around the country, around the world.

 

As a teen-ager, I awoke to latest hits,

re-broadcasts of The Shadow,

The Lone Ranger, some comedy.

 

Now, with Granma gone,

I wake up to NPR news,

“find out what goes on in the world.

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Now, it’s your turn. Think of one thing you remember about your grandmother and write about it in the comments field. What you share doesn’t have to be in poetic form. I look forward to reading about your memories.

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Author Abbie Johnson Taylor

We Shall Overcome

How to Build a Better Mousetrap: Recollections and Reflections of a Family Caregiver

That’s Life: New and Selected Poems

My Ideal Partner: How I Met, Married, and Cared for the Man I Loved Despite Debilitating Odds

Click to hear an audio trailer.

Like me on Facebook.