Even Now #TuesdayTidbit #Poetry #Inspiration

Abbie wears a blue and white V-neck top with different shades of blue from sky to navy that swirl together with the white. She has short, brown hair and rosy cheeks and smiles at the camera against a black background.

Photo Courtesy of Tess Anderson Photography

 

 

Even Now

by Abbie Johnson Taylor

Copyright 2022.

 

 

Ten years after his death,

I remember his soft, gentle voice,

tall physique, gray hair, sunglasses,

the blue jeans and t-shirts he wore,

his cologne’s musky scent.

 

I long to see him, smell him, hear him,

my husband of seven years.

The idea that he’s in a better place comforts me.

After suffering two paralyzing strokes,

he can now walk and see better than before.

Maybe someday, we’ll be together and happy forever.

***

The above poem appears in the current issue of The Writer’s Grapevine, which can be downloaded here. My years of caring for my totally blind late husband, paralyzed by two strokes soon after we were married, inspired me to write it. You can click below to hear me read it.

 

Even Now

***

If you haven’t already done so, please subscribe to my email list to receive my twice-yearly newsletter and other announcements. This is a one-way announcements list, meaning the only messages you’ll receive will come from me. So, you can rest assured that this list is low-traffic. Send a blank email to:  newsfrommycorner+subscribe@groups.io  You’ll receive a confirmation email. Reply to that with another blank message, and you should be good to go.

***

New! Why Grandma Doesn’t Know Me

Copyright 2021 by Abbie Johnson Taylor.

Independently published with the help of DLD Books.

The cover of the book features an older woman sitting in a wicker chair facing a window. The world beyond the window is bright, and several plants are visible on the terrace. Behind the woman’s chair is another plant, with a tall stalk and wide rounded leaves. The woman has short, white hair, glasses, a red sweater, and tan pants. The border of the picture is a taupe color and reads "Why Grandma Doesn't Know Me" above the photo and "Abbie Johnson Taylor" below it.

Sixteen-year-old Natalie’s grandmother, suffering from dementia and confined to a wheelchair, lives in a nursing home and rarely recognizes Natalie. But one Halloween night, she tells her a shocking secret that only she and Natalie’s mother know. Natalie is the product of a one-night stand between her mother, who is a college English teacher, and another professor.

After some research, Natalie learns that people with dementia often have vivid memories of past events. Still not wanting to believe what her grandmother has told her, she finds her biological father online. The resemblance between them is undeniable. Not knowing what else to do, she shows his photo and website to her parents.

Natalie realizes she has some growing up to do. Scared and confused, she reaches out to her biological father, and they start corresponding.

Her younger sister, Sarah, senses their parents’ marital difficulties. At Thanksgiving, when she has an opportunity to see Santa Claus, she asks him to bring them together again. Can the jolly old elf grant her request?

***

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How to Get a New Guide Dog #WordPressWednesday #Reblogs #Inspiration

A photo of Abbie smiling in front of a white background. Her brown hair is cut short and frames her face. She is wearing a bright red shirt and a dark, flowy scarf swirled with hues of purple, pinks and blues.

On Monday, I shared a post from a guide dog’s point of view, which you can read here if you haven’t already done so. In the post I’m sharing today, fellow author Mary Hiland talks about how a blind person obtains a guide dog. Mary recently lost her Seeing Eye dog and hopes to get another soon. She has written some awesome books, and you can read my reviews of these books here and here. Now, here’s Mary!

***

By now you know that I lost my dear sweet Dora to cancer on April 3 of this year. Without going into the heartbreaking details, I’ll share with you what comes next. As with any kind of grief, I needed a few weeks to recover from this life-changing loss. Eventually, I was so lost without her that I finally contacted The Seeing Eye to apply for my next partner in life.

 

Read the original post.

The Wheels Are Turning at the Seeing Eye #FridayFinds #Reblogs #Inspiration

A photo of Abbie smiling in front of a white background. Her brown hair is cut short and frames her face. She is wearing a bright red shirt and a dark, flowy scarf swirled with hues of purple, pinks and blues.

After losing her guide dog six weeks ago, fellow author and blogger Mary Hiland is finally ready for another one. In this post, she explains the first steps in applying for a guide dog. You can check out my reviews of her books

here and here. Enjoy!

***

My darling Dora died of cancer six weeks ago. While there are times that something sets me off, a word, a song, or just the overbearing feeling of loneliness, and I weep, even sob, in self-indulgent sadness, I know that sooner or later, I must replace her with a new Seeing Eye ® dog. I hate using the word replace, because a dog like Dora cannot be replaced. Yet, I can’t go on needing to hold the arm of a kind person to go anywhere outside my home, and I’m terrible at using a white cane. It’s time to go back to the Seeing Eye to train with a new dog to regain my independence.

 

Read the full post on Seeing It My Way.

Thought-Provoking and Powerful Poetry #FridayFunReads #Poetry #Inspiration

A photo of Abbie smiling in front of a white background. She has short brown hair which is cut short and frames her face. She is wearing a bright red shirt and a dark, flowy scarf swirled with hues of purple, pinks and blues.

Origami Stars and Hot Air Moon

by Mandie Hines

Copyright 2020

 

What Amazon Says

 

To get past grief, we must go through it. In Origami Stars and Hot Air Moon, Mandie Hines traverses through the process of grieving, finding understanding of what loss is, and what it is not. These poems take you through a journey of reclaiming hope, remembering love, and rediscovering memories, while taking you down a path that eventually leads to healing.

 

Buy from Amazon.

 

My Thoughts

 

I met the author, Mandie Hines, a few years ago through WyoPoets, my state’s poetry society. I enjoyed hearing her read her work during our monthly Zoom events. Now, I finally got around to reading this, her first poetry collection.

I liked the narrative quality of these poems. “Things I Regret Forgetting,” the first one, reminded me of losing my husband. Closer to the end of the book, she includes a poem called “About the Things I Regret Forgetting,” which explains the original poem, and I think that adds a nice touch.

Many of the poems are powerful, pinpointing loss and grief. Others speculate on poetry and various topics. I’m sure many writers will relate to “SASE,” a supposed response to a rejection letter. The title poem at the end brings the collection to a satisfying conclusion. If you’re dealing with loss and/or enjoy narrative poetry that evokes powerful thoughts, Origami Stars and Hot Air Moon is for you.

 

New! Why Grandma Doesn’t Know Me

Copyright 2021 by Abbie Johnson Taylor.

Independently published with the help of DLD Books.

The cover of the book features an older woman sitting in a wicker chair facing a window. The world beyond the window is bright, and several plants are visible on the terrace. Behind the woman’s chair is another plant, with a tall stalk and wide rounded leaves. The woman has short, white hair, glasses, a red sweater, and tan pants. The border of the picture is a taupe color and reads "Why Grandma Doesn't Know Me" above the photo and "Abbie Johnson Taylor" below it.

Sixteen-year-old Natalie’s grandmother, suffering from dementia and confined to a wheelchair, lives in a nursing home and rarely recognizes Natalie. But one Halloween night, she tells her a shocking secret that only she and Natalie’s mother know. Natalie is the product of a one-night stand between her mother, who is a college English teacher, and another professor.

After some research, Natalie learns that people with dementia often have vivid memories of past events. Still not wanting to believe what her grandmother has told her, she finds her biological father online. The resemblance between them is undeniable. Not knowing what else to do, she shows his photo and website to her parents.

Natalie realizes she has some growing up to do. Scared and confused, she reaches out to her biological father, and they start corresponding.

Her younger sister, Sarah, senses their parents’ marital difficulties. At Thanksgiving, when she has an opportunity to see Santa Claus, she asks him to bring them together again. Can the jolly old elf grant her request?

***

Facebook

Website

 

 

Yartzeit *anniversary of a loved one’s death* #SocialMediaMonday#Poetry #Inspiration

Here’s something from fellow poet Joan Myles that tugged at my heart. I’m planning to read her latest collection, One Goes to the Sea, and review it here sometime this month. So, please stay tuned. Meanwhile, here’s a poem she wrote as a tribute to her mother, who passed several years ago.

Yartzeit
my glass of wine sanctifies time
but can’t bring you back
again I open the window
as a sign for both of us

 

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