Poems About Elephants and the Natural World #Friday Fun Reads

The Elephants and Everybody Else

 

What The Author Says

 

Since Amazon provides little information about this book, I emailed Ronald Baatz, and he graciously sent me the following.

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The book takes place wherever elephants happen to live. I have never lived in any of these places, nor have I visited them. The book was basically inspired by the dreams I had about elephants when I was a child, and those dreams are still with me. Elephants are such magnificent creatures.  Very complex, soulful and wise, they know the joys and sorrows. And maybe they are even aware of the fact that they are going to die one day. Who knows?  So, the book is simply an effort on my part to portray elephants as I see them, and in the process, I allowed my imagination to run a little wild…

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My Thoughts

 

This book was featured in The Weekly Avocet, a journal showcasing nature poetry, where some of my work has been published. I like the narrative quality of these poems. The stories they tell have a fairy tale quality, offering us a glimpse into  worlds unlike our own. Some poems contain violence against elephants and other creatures. Others portray relationships between humans and between people and the natural world. As you read these whimsical pieces, you may forget you’re reading poetry and think you’re losing yourself in stories that transport you to a faraway land where elephants live among humans.

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By the way, for those of you who use the National Library Services for the Blind and Print Disabled, The Red Dress is available for download from their site here. Thank you for reading. Stay safe, happy, and healthy, and may you always have positive experiences.

New! The Red Dress

Copyright July 2019 by DLD Books

Front cover contains: young, dark-haired woman in red dress holding flowers

When Eve went to her high school senior prom, she wore a red dress that her mother had made for her. That night, after dancing with the boy of her dreams, she caught him in the act with her best friend. Months later, Eve, a freshman in college, is bullied into giving the dress to her roommate. After her mother finds out, their relationship is never the same again.

Twenty-five years later, Eve, a bestselling author, is happily married with three children. Although her mother suffers from dementia, she still remembers, and Eve still harbors the guilt for giving the dress away. When she receives a Facebook friend request from her old college roommate and an invitation to her twenty-five-year high school class reunion, then meets her former best friend by chance, she must confront the past in order to face the future.

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Let’s Do This #TMI Tuesday June 16 2020

Here are my answers to this week’s questions. After reading them, you can find out how to participate.

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1. What do you think are the best and worst parts of human nature? The best part is our willingness to help others. The worst part is our temper.

 

2. What is something terrifying that you have come to accept as a fact of life? Even now, in the 21st century, there are plenty of racists in the world. Some of them are police officers who would kill a man simply because he’s black.

 

3. What piece of media (book, movie, TV show, etc.) changed the way you viewed the world? How? When I was in college, I read Ellery Queen’s The Chinese Orange Mystery. Before that, I’d enjoyed Nancy Drew and Trixie Belden mysteries. So, I decided to try something of a more adult nature. This book takes place in the 1930’s when the police were more brutal than they are now.

For a while after reading it, I was terrified of policemen. Years later, this partly inspired my first novel, We Shall Overcome.

4. You must pick one:

– Facebook or Twitter? I prefer Facebook because there doesn’t seem to be a limit on how many characters you can post.

– Cake or Pie? I like cake because it usually doesn’t have a hard crust. But I love pizza, and if the crust’s too hard, I won’t eat it.
– Swimming or Sunbathing? I don’t do much of either one. On the rare occasions when I go to a beach, I usually walk in the water.

– Nice Car or Nice Home Interior? Since I don’t drive, I’ll take the nice home interior, please.

Bonus: If pressing a button meant you received five million dollars, (USD) but it also killed five people somewhere in the world, would you press it? This is a no-brainer. The lives of five innocent people are not worth five million dollars.

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Now, it’s your turn. Click here to learn how to participate. Alternatively, you can answer one or more of the questions in the comment field below. Any way you do it, I look forward to reading your answers.By the way, my latest book The Red Dress, is now available from the National Library Services for the Blind and Print Disabled website. If you use this service, click here.

 

New! The Red Dress

Copyright July 2019 by DLD Books

Front cover contains: young, dark-haired woman in red dress holding flowers

When Eve went to her high school senior prom, she wore a red dress that her mother had made for her. That night, after dancing with the boy of her dreams, she caught him in the act with her best friend. Months later, Eve, a freshman in college, is bullied into giving the dress to her roommate. After her mother finds out, their relationship is never the same again.

Twenty-five years later, Eve, a bestselling author, is happily married with three children. Although her mother suffers from dementia, she still remembers, and Eve still harbors the guilt for giving the dress away. When she receives a Facebook friend request from her old college roommate and an invitation to her twenty-five-year high school class reunion, then meets her former best friend by chance, she must confront the past in order to face the future.

***

My Books

My Amazon Author Page

Facebook

WebsiteImage contains: Abbie, smiling.

 

 

In the Garden (Poetry)

Image contains: Abbie, smiling.

On this, the last day of National Poetry Month, here’s a poem that appears in the spring/summer issue of Magnets and Ladders, which is produced by Behind Our Eyes, (BOE) an organization of writers with disabilities.

Another version of this was published in my collection, How to Build a Better Mousetrap: Recollections and Reflections of a Family Caregiver. You can click on the Play button below to hear me read it. I hope that as we move into May, you’ll still take time to read a poem or two now and then. Poetry is meant to be enjoyed year round, not just in April.

 

In The Garden

 

There are no trees, just an expanse of dirt
with steps leading down from the yard.
At the age of twelve, while Mother and Dad work,
I sit on the steps,
study seed packets of peas, corn, tomatoes.
With limited vision,
I read labels, gaze at pictures.
Five-year-old brother Andy is out riding his bike.

Sirens wail in the distance, come closer, are silenced.
“It sounds like fire engines,” says Dad.
After a while, the phone rings.
I hurry in the house to answer it.
A male voice asks for my mother.
I rush outside, call her to the phone.

“Hello,” she says.
“Oh my god! We’ll be right there.”
She slams down the receiver,
returns to the yard, me in tow.
“Ed, we need to pick up Andy at the police station.
He was playing with matches near that shack
at the bottom of the hill when it caught fire.”
I’m abandoned in the garden.

 

 

My Books

 

My Ideal Partner: How I Met, Married, and Cared for the Man I Loved Despite Debilitating Odds

That’s Life: New and Selected Poems

How to Build a better Mousetrap: Recollections and Reflections of a Family Caregiver

We Shall Overcome

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Thursday Book Feature: The Writer’s Pen and Other Poems

Image contains: Abbie, smiling.

Since April is National Poetry Month, I hope you’ll take some  time to read a good poem or two. This month, I’ll be reviewing some poetry collections I’ve enjoyed.

The Writer’s Pen and Other Poems

By K. Morris

Copyright 2018.

 

This short collection contains poems mostly about human nature. When I downloaded the Audible version, I was surprised to discover that Alex Lee, the narrator, is a woman. She does an excellent job. Her reading of one poem about a clock and a refrigerator includes sound effects. Some poems remind me of Robert Frost and other such poets. I recommend this book as a delightful twenty-five minutes of poetry reading.

 

My Books

 

My Ideal Partner: How I Met, Married, and Cared for the Man I Loved Despite Debilitating Odds

That’s Life: New and Selected Poems

How to Build a better Mousetrap: Recollections and Reflections of a Family Caregiver

We Shall Overcome

My Other Links

Visit my website.

Like me on Facebook.