In the Kitchen #MondayMusings #OpenBookBlogHop #Inspiration

Welcome to another edition of Open Book Blog Hop. This week’s question is: “What skill do you wish you had, either as a hobby or career builder?”

I’m a writer and a musician and can’t think of any other skills I want. However, when my husband Bill was alive, I wished I’d taken time to learn to cook from him. If I’d known he would have two strokes that would prevent him from cooking, I would have paid more attention to what he was doing in the kitchen.

After his strokes, when he lost the use of his left arm and leg, he could only tell me what to do. He couldn’t give me hands-on instruction on peeling and chopping vegetables or mashing potatoes, skills at which he excelled. I rarely made scrambled eggs, oatmeal, or meatloaf at the right consistency.

The good news is he seemed happy with my cooking. He offered lots of praise and encouragement. His love was all the reward I needed for my efforts. You can read our story in my memoir, My Ideal Partner: How I Met, Married, and Cared for the Man I Loved Despite Debilitating Odds.

How about you? Is there a skill you wish you’d learned? You can click here to participate in this week’s hop and read other responses.

 

Abbie wears a blue and white V-neck top with different shades of blue from sky to navy that swirl together with the white. She has short, brown hair and rosy cheeks and smiles at the camera against a black background.

Photo Courtesy of Tess Anderson Photography

Photo Resize and Description by

Two Pentacles Publishing.

 

 

If you haven’t already done so, please subscribe to my email list to receive my monthly newsletter and other announcements. This is a one-way announcements list, meaning the only messages you’ll receive will come from me. So, you can rest assured that this list is low-traffic. Send a blank email to:  newsfrommycorner+subscribe@groups.io  You’ll receive a confirmation email. Reply to that with another blank message, and you should be good to go.

 

New! Why Grandma Doesn’t Know Me

Copyright 2021 by Abbie Johnson Taylor.

Independently published with the help of DLD Books.

The cover of the book features an older woman sitting in a wicker chair facing a window. The world beyond the window is bright, and several plants are visible on the terrace. Behind the woman’s chair is another plant, with a tall stalk and wide rounded leaves. The woman has short, white hair, glasses, a red sweater, and tan pants. The border of the picture is a taupe color and reads "Why Grandma Doesn't Know Me" above the photo and "Abbie Johnson Taylor" below it.

Photo Resize and Description by

Two Pentacles Publishing.

 

 

 

 

Sixteen-year-old Natalie’s grandmother, suffering from dementia and confined to a wheelchair, lives in a nursing home and rarely recognizes Natalie. But one Halloween night, she tells her a shocking secret that only she and Natalie’s mother know. Natalie is the product of a one-night stand between her mother, who is a college English teacher, and another professor.

After some research, Natalie learns that people with dementia often have vivid memories of past events. Still not wanting to believe what her grandmother has told her, she finds her biological father online. The resemblance between them is undeniable. Not knowing what else to do, she shows his photo and website to her parents.

Natalie realizes she has some growing up to do. Scared and confused, she reaches out to her biological father, and they start corresponding.

Her younger sister, Sarah, senses their parents’ marital difficulties. At Thanksgiving, when she has an opportunity to see Santa Claus, she asks him to bring them together again. Can the jolly old elf grant her request?

***

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K Is for King of the Mountain #TuesdayTidbit #Life’sAlphabet #Inspiration

“I’m king of the mountain when I’m in my recliner,” my late husband Bill once proclaimed. Being partially paralyzed by two strokes, unable to do much for himself, he delighted in small things the rest of us take for granted. Today, Bill is gone, but the recliner is still here, and I’m queen of the mountain when I use it.

When I first wrote the following poem, I entitled it “King of the Mountain.” Later, I realized that didn’t fit. The poem was published in my collection, How to Build a Better Mousetrap, and my memoir, My Ideal Partner. You can click on the title to hear me read it.

***

Recumbent

by Abbie Johnson Taylor

Copyright 2011.

 

With his good hand, he presses a button.

The chair reclines.

Familiar objects are within reach,

telephone, radio, drink,

cassette player, bag of nuts, TV remote control.

As I cover him with poncho and blanket,

his sightless eyes gaze at me with love.

He smiles, content.

 

***

Thanks to BeetleyPete for inspiring my Life’s Alphabet weekly feature with the daily one he posted on his blog last December.

 

Abbie wears a blue and white V-neck top with different shades of blue from sky to navy that swirl together with the white. She has short, brown hair and rosy cheeks and smiles at the camera against a black background.

 

Photo Courtesy of Tess Anderson Photography

Photo Resize and Description by

Two Pentacles Publishing.

 

 

If you haven’t already done so, please subscribe to my email list to receive my monthly newsletter and other announcements. This is a one-way announcements list, meaning the only messages you’ll receive will come from me. So, you can rest assured that this list is low-traffic. Send a blank email to:  newsfrommycorner+subscribe@groups.io  You’ll receive a confirmation email. Reply to that with another blank message, and you should be good to go.

 

New! Why Grandma Doesn’t Know Me

Copyright 2021 by Abbie Johnson Taylor.

Independently published with the help of DLD Books.

The cover of the book features an older woman sitting in a wicker chair facing a window. The world beyond the window is bright, and several plants are visible on the terrace. Behind the woman’s chair is another plant, with a tall stalk and wide rounded leaves. The woman has short, white hair, glasses, a red sweater, and tan pants. The border of the picture is a taupe color and reads "Why Grandma Doesn't Know Me" above the photo and "Abbie Johnson Taylor" below it.Photo Resize and Description by

Two Pentacles Publishing.

 

 

 

 

Sixteen-year-old Natalie’s grandmother, suffering from dementia and confined to a wheelchair, lives in a nursing home and rarely recognizes Natalie. But one Halloween night, she tells her a shocking secret that only she and Natalie’s mother know. Natalie is the product of a one-night stand between her mother, who is a college English teacher, and another professor.

After some research, Natalie learns that people with dementia often have vivid memories of past events. Still not wanting to believe what her grandmother has told her, she finds her biological father online. The resemblance between them is undeniable. Not knowing what else to do, she shows his photo and website to her parents.

Natalie realizes she has some growing up to do. Scared and confused, she reaches out to her biological father, and they start corresponding.

Her younger sister, Sarah, senses their parents’ marital difficulties. At Thanksgiving, when she has an opportunity to see Santa Claus, she asks him to bring them together again. Can the jolly old elf grant her request?

***

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H is for Husband #TuesdayTidbit #Life’sAlphabet #Inspiration

Thanks to BeetleyPete for inspiring this series with one of his own he posted in December of last year, in which he wrote every day about his life, using consecutive letters of the alphabet. This week’s letter is H.

When I met my late husband, I was in my forties, and he was in his sixties. I hadn’t been in a relationship before and was content to remain single for the rest of my life, figuring it was better to never love than to love and be cheated on or abused.

Then, along came Bill. At the time, I was living in Sheridan, Wyoming, where I’m still living now. Bill lived in Fowler, Colorado.

In 2003, we met through Newsreel, an audio magazine where blind and visually impaired adults share ideas, music, poetry, etc. I posed a question about computers. Bill, having built and sold computers for twenty years, emailed me an answer. I wrote him back, and that’s how it started.

For the next couple of years, we corresponded several times a day by email and by phone once or twice a week. My father and I visited Bill in Fowler on our way to New Mexico to see relatives. Finally, in January of 2005, I received the shock of my life, a letter in the mail in Braille from Bill, asking me to marry him.

All this time, I thought he just wanted to be friends. But as I found out later, he’d been dropping subtle hints that hadn’t registered. When Dad and I had visited him the previous Christmas, for example, Bill had suggested we kiss under the mistletoe, but I’d thought he was joking.

Bill had proposed to other women before me and had been rejected. It had taken him six months to work up the courage to ask me to marry him because he didn’t want to face yet another rejection.

Well, he almost did. Taken completely by surprise, I didn’t think I wanted to be his wife. It took a couple of months and a visit from him with an official proposal, including a ring and necklace before I finally realized, for no reason I could fathom, that I loved him.

Bill moved to Sheridan, and we were married in September of 2005 in my grandmother’s back yard. Three months later, our lives changed again. Bill suffered the first of two strokes that paralyzed his left side. He spent nine months in the nursing home where I’d worked for fifteen years as a registered music therapist. In September of 2006, when I brought him home, he was in a wheelchair. We both hoped he’d eventually get back on his feet with the help of outpatient physical therapy.

But in January of 2007, almost a year to the day of his first stroke, he suffered a second one. It wasn’t as severe, but it was enough to set him back to the point that he would never walk again. I cared for him at home, most of the time, until he passed in October of 2012.

You can read the story of how I met, married, and cared for Bill in My Ideal Partner. This is a memoir containing a poem at the end of each chapter. I leave you now with one such poem. You can click on the title to hear me read it.

 

BILL’S HANDS

 

 

Soft, gentle, they caressed me,

once milked cows, fed livestock, gathered eggs,

tapped computer keys in a busy office,

glided across Braille pages,

placed a ring on my finger, as he said, “I do.”

When one hand no longer worked,

the other did what it could.

Now they’re both gone

but will be remembered.

Abbie wears a blue and white V-neck top with different shades of blue from sky to navy that swirl together with the white. She has short, brown hair and rosy cheeks and smiles at the camera against a black background.

Photo Courtesy of Tess Anderson Photography

Photo Resize and Description by

Two Pentacles Publishing.

 

 

If you haven’t already done so, please subscribe to my email list to receive my monthly newsletter and other announcements. This is a one-way announcements list, meaning the only messages you’ll receive will come from me. So, you can rest assured that this list is low-traffic. Send a blank email to:  newsfrommycorner+subscribe@groups.io  You’ll receive a confirmation email. Reply to that with another blank message, and you should be good to go.

Note that I’ll no longer post my Joyous Jotting series here. So, if you like reading about my life from the perspective of my robotic cat, please subscribe to my newsletter. Starting next month, that’s the only place you’ll find this feature.

 

New! Why Grandma Doesn’t Know Me

Copyright 2021 by Abbie Johnson Taylor.

Independently published with the help of DLD Books.

The cover of the book features an older woman sitting in a wicker chair facing a window. The world beyond the window is bright, and several plants are visible on the terrace. Behind the woman’s chair is another plant, with a tall stalk and wide rounded leaves. The woman has short, white hair, glasses, a red sweater, and tan pants. The border of the picture is a taupe color and reads "Why Grandma Doesn't Know Me" above the photo and "Abbie Johnson Taylor" below it.Photo Resize and Description by

Two Pentacles Publishing.

 

Sixteen-year-old Natalie’s grandmother, suffering from dementia and confined to a wheelchair, lives in a nursing home and rarely recognizes Natalie. But one Halloween night, she tells her a shocking secret that only she and Natalie’s mother know. Natalie is the product of a one-night stand between her mother, who is a college English teacher, and another professor.

After some research, Natalie learns that people with dementia often have vivid memories of past events. Still not wanting to believe what her grandmother has told her, she finds her biological father online. The resemblance between them is undeniable. Not knowing what else to do, she shows his photo and website to her parents.

Natalie realizes she has some growing up to do. Scared and confused, she reaches out to her biological father, and they start corresponding.

Her younger sister, Sarah, senses their parents’ marital difficulties. At Thanksgiving, when she has an opportunity to see Santa Claus, she asks him to bring them together again. Can the jolly old elf grant her request?

***

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A Review of My Ideal Partner #WednesdayWords #Memoirs #Inspiration

Thanks to Trish Hubschman, author of the Tracy Gayle mystery series, for the following review of one of my books.

***

I spent the weekend reading Abbie Johnson Taylor’s book, My Ideal Partner: How I Met, Married, and Cared for the Man I Loved Despite Debilitating Odds. This was my second time reading it. The first time was a few years ago. I picked up so much more this time around. It’s heart-warming and heart-breaking. It’s the story of perseverance and true love.

Abbie’s husband suffered two strokes, and she was there for him, helped him. She was his nurse, his wife, his everything. It’s a beautiful story. Abbie’s an excellent writer. In the course of My Ideal Partner, she mentions two other books she’s written: That’s Life and We Shall Overcome. I’m eager to track down those books and read them.

 

By Trish Hubschman

Author of the Tracy Gayle mystery series

Visit Trish’s Website.

Click here for more information and purchasing links for My Ideal Partner.

***

Reviews are important to authors because they can boost sales. If you’ve read one of my books, please leave a review where you purchased it. Alternatively, you can use the contact form  to email me your review, and I’ll be glad to post it here and on my website. Thank you.

 

Abbie wears a blue and white V-neck top with different shades of blue from sky to navy that swirl together with the white. She has short, brown hair and rosy cheeks and smiles at the camera against a black background.

Photo Courtesy of Tess Anderson Photography

Photo Resize and Description by

Two Pentacles Publishing.

 

If you haven’t already done so, please subscribe to my email list to receive my monthly newsletter and other announcements. This is a one-way announcements list, meaning the only messages you’ll receive will come from me. So, you can rest assured that this list is low-traffic. Send a blank email to:  newsfrommycorner+subscribe@groups.io  You’ll receive a confirmation email. Reply to that with another blank message, and you should be good to go.

 

New! Why Grandma Doesn’t Know Me

Copyright 2021 by Abbie Johnson Taylor.

Independently published with the help of DLD Books.

The cover of the book features an older woman sitting in a wicker chair facing a window. The world beyond the window is bright, and several plants are visible on the terrace. Behind the woman’s chair is another plant, with a tall stalk and wide rounded leaves. The woman has short, white hair, glasses, a red sweater, and tan pants. The border of the picture is a taupe color and reads "Why Grandma Doesn't Know Me" above the photo and "Abbie Johnson Taylor" below it.Photo Resize and Description by

Two Pentacles Publishing.

 

Sixteen-year-old Natalie’s grandmother, suffering from dementia and confined to a wheelchair, lives in a nursing home and rarely recognizes Natalie. But one Halloween night, she tells her a shocking secret that only she and Natalie’s mother know. Natalie is the product of a one-night stand between her mother, who is a college English teacher, and another professor.

After some research, Natalie learns that people with dementia often have vivid memories of past events. Still not wanting to believe what her grandmother has told her, she finds her biological father online. The resemblance between them is undeniable. Not knowing what else to do, she shows his photo and website to her parents.

Natalie realizes she has some growing up to do. Scared and confused, she reaches out to her biological father, and they start corresponding.

Her younger sister, Sarah, senses their parents’ marital difficulties. At Thanksgiving, when she has an opportunity to see Santa Claus, she asks him to bring them together again. Can the jolly old elf grant her request?

***

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Potty Humor #MondayMusings#OpenBookBlogHop #Poetry

Welcome to another edition of Open Book Blog Hop. This week’s question is: “Do you include any inside jokes or Easter eggs in your work?”

No, but I interject some humor in my writing. Take, for example, my poem, “The Bedroom,” published in my collection, How to Build a Better Mousetrap, and my memoir, My Ideal Partner. Here, I make light of one dreaded caregiving task, getting up in the middle of the night to help my husband relieve himself. you can click this link to listen to me read it.

***

 

THE BEDROOM

 

 

At three in the morning,

I’m mildly aroused

by the gentle touch of his hand.

He only has one good arm and leg,

still knows how to please me.

As he strokes me,

and I breathe the scent of his sweat,

I purr with anticipation.

He whispers, “I need to pee.”

***

How about you authors out there? Do you share inside jokes or Easter eggs in your writing? You can click here to participate in this week’s hop and read others’ responses.

 

Abbie wears a blue and white V-neck top with different shades of blue from sky to navy that swirl together with the white. She has short, brown hair and rosy cheeks and smiles at the camera against a black background.

Photo Courtesy of Tess Anderson Photography

Photo Resize and Description by

Two Pentacles Publishing.

 

If you haven’t already done so, please subscribe to my email list to receive my monthly newsletter and other announcements. This is a one-way announcements list, meaning the only messages you’ll receive will come from me. So, you can rest assured that this list is low-traffic. Send a blank email to:  newsfrommycorner+subscribe@groups.io  You’ll receive a confirmation email. Reply to that with another blank message, and you should be good to go.

 

New! Why Grandma Doesn’t Know Me

Copyright 2021 by Abbie Johnson Taylor.

Independently published with the help of DLD Books.

The cover of the book features an older woman sitting in a wicker chair facing a window. The world beyond the window is bright, and several plants are visible on the terrace. Behind the woman’s chair is another plant, with a tall stalk and wide rounded leaves. The woman has short, white hair, glasses, a red sweater, and tan pants. The border of the picture is a taupe color and reads "Why Grandma Doesn't Know Me" above the photo and "Abbie Johnson Taylor" below it.Photo Resize and Description by

Two Pentacles Publishing.

 

Sixteen-year-old Natalie’s grandmother, suffering from dementia and confined to a wheelchair, lives in a nursing home and rarely recognizes Natalie. But one Halloween night, she tells her a shocking secret that only she and Natalie’s mother know. Natalie is the product of a one-night stand between her mother, who is a college English teacher, and another professor.

After some research, Natalie learns that people with dementia often have vivid memories of past events. Still not wanting to believe what her grandmother has told her, she finds her biological father online. The resemblance between them is undeniable. Not knowing what else to do, she shows his photo and website to her parents.

Natalie realizes she has some growing up to do. Scared and confused, she reaches out to her biological father, and they start corresponding.

Her younger sister, Sarah, senses their parents’ marital difficulties. At Thanksgiving, when she has an opportunity to see Santa Claus, she asks him to bring them together again. Can the jolly old elf grant her request?

***

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