Little Houses

Today’s poem was inspired by the NaPoWriMo prompt at http://www.napowrimo.net/day-twenty-nine/ . Click on the Dropbox link below the poem to hear me read it.

 

LITTLE HOUSES

 

Laura Ingalls Wilder, the little girl

who lived in the big woods, grew up,

got married, had a daughter,

Rose Wilder Lane, wrote about

her life with Rose’s help.

Her tales delighted me and other children.

 

Now, Susan Wittig Albert

writes about Rose and Laura’s lives during the Depression,

how Rose and Laura collaborated

on the Little House books,

still fascinating to me, but do today’s young people

want to know about life over a hundred years ago?

Do they care about a family on the prairie,

struggling to stay alive through harsh winters, drought?

This book should encourage mothers to read to their daughters,

as mine did, about the little girl in the big woods.

 

https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/15213189/little%20houses.mp3

 

Do you remember reading the little house books when you were a child? Did you have any favorite books in the series that you read more than once? Mine was Little Town on the Prairie, in which Laura, a teen-ager, starts working to support her family and launches her teaching career. I hope to finish Susana Wittig Albert’s book in time to blog about it next week so stay tuned.

 

Abbie Johnson Taylor, Author

 

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A Poem about My Mother

Today’s poem was inspired by the NaPoWriMo prompt at http://www.napowrimo.net/day-twenty-five/ . This is a clerihew, a humorous four-line poem about someone. May my poor dear mother rest in peace.

 

My mother’s name was Joan.

She loved to talk on the phone.

We kids often thought she was mean.

“Not now,” she’d say. “I’m talking to Norleen.”

 

Now, I double dare you, my readers, to write one of these. Even if you don’t think you’re a poet, you should be able to do this. Think of someone you know whose name is easy to rhyme. Your first line should have that person’s name at the end. Your second line rhymes with your first line. Write your last two lines with a different rhyme. According to the article at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clerihew , the meter doesn’t have to be precise. Have fun with this, and feel free to leave your results in the comment field. Thank goodness my name isn’t easy to rhyme.

 

Abbie Johnson Taylor, Author

 

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Flowers Bring Hope

Today is Earth Day. I was inspired to post the following poem by the NaPoWriMo prompt at http://www.napowrimo.net/day-twenty-two/ . I wrote this a year ago, and you can click on the Dropbox link below the poem to hear me read it.

 

FLOWERS BRING HOPE

 

 

 

Arrow leaf, balsam root

Blanket the hillside

near a pristine lake,

 

bring hope of spring

soon to come,

an end to brutal winter.

 

Warm temperatures

around the corner

melt snow, clear ice.

 

A new beginning

will shortly arrive,

end nature’s tyranny,

 

but even in June,

snow dots mountaintops,

as winter holds on.

 

Meanwhile, in the valleys,

Spring has arrived

with lupine, hope.

 

 

 

https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/15213189/flowers%20bring%20hope.mp3

 

Abbie Johnson Taylor, Author

 

Order That’s Life from Finishing Line Press.

 

Order That’s Life from Amazon.

 

Vote for my new book idea.

Teresa’s Forcast

I was inspired to post today’s poem by the prompt at http://www.napowrimo.net/day-fourteen-2/ . I wrote this several years ago after a conversation with my cleaning lady. To hear me read it, click on the Dropbox link below the poem.

 

TERESA’S FORCAST

 

“It’s going to be hot forever,”

she says on a sweltering July day.

“seventy-six degrees in San Diego,

a hundred and six here. Maybe by Thanksgiving,

you’ll be able to cook your turkey indoors,

but the climate’s getting warmer.”

 

“Not in Wyoming–She’s full of it,” I tell myself.

“Take what she says with a grain of salt.”

 

As she leaves, she says,

“It’s a hundred degrees. Don’t go out.”

 

“You probably shouldn’t be out, either,” I say.

“Why don’t you stay?”

She snickers–the kitchen door slams.

 

https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/15213189/teresa%27s%20forcast.mp3

 

Abbie Johnson Taylor, Author

 

Order That’s Life from Finishing Line Press.

 

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Vote for my new book idea.

Writer’s Block

I was inspired to post today’s poem by Robert Lee Brewer’s daily prompt at http://www.writersdigest.com/whats-new/2015-april-pad-challenge-day-9 . This is a sonnet I wrote years ago in which the first seven lines and the second seven lines mirror each other. I needed to alter some of the lines in the second set for the poem to make sense, but according to local poet Jane Elkington Wohl, who taught this type of sonnet to my writers’ group, this is normal.

 

WRITER’S BLOCK

 

The weather is cold and cloudy and bleak

and I don’t know what to write except that

I’m suffering from writer’s block and that’s

a royal pain in the butt, don’t you know?

The pressure is on. I must finish this

so I can move on to some other things.

So what shall I write? So what shall I write?

So what shall I write? So what shall I write

so I can move on to some other things?

The pressure is on. I must finish this.

I’m suffering from writer’s block and that’s

a royal pain in the butt, don’t you know?

And I don’t know what to write except that

the weather is cold and cloudy and bleak.

 

Abbie Johnson Taylor, Author

 

Order That’s Life from Finishing Line Press.

 

Order That’s Life from Amazon.

 

Vote for my new book idea.