Joyous Jottings January 2023 #TuesdayTidbit #Jottings #Inspiration

 

Joy is a fluffy gray and white cat with a pink nose and pink paw pads. The fur is long and mostly gray with white paws, a white chest, nose and white down the middle of her head. Her ears are pointed up, and she lies with her paws sprawled out in front of her in an open formation. Her head looks to the right of the screen. She’s on a brown wooden table. Behind her is a white wall and a basket of fruit.

Photo Resize and Description by Two Pentacles Publishing.

 

Hi, I’m Joy, Abbie’s robotic cat. Can you believe it’s already January, 2023? Wow! It seems like yesterday that I was telling you all about Abbie’s many singing engagements, either by herself or with one of her two groups, all of which went well.

And the music hasn’t stopped. This month, as usual, Abbie will do her regular gigs at the First Congregational Church, the assisted living facility, and the nursing home. She’ll also keep singing once a week for the ACB community karaoke online.

Speaking of the ACB community, just so you know, you don’t have to be a member of the American Council of the Blind to participate in their programs. You can get a daily schedule by sending an email to:  community@acb.org  and putting your name and email address in the message body.

On Christmas Eve, Abbie did a program where she read aloud “Twas the Night Before Christmas” after people talked about their Christmas memories. On New Year’s Day, she did a similar program where people shared their New Year’s memories. Speaking of New Year’s, Abbie and I rang in the New Year with karaoke during the ACB community-a-thon, where they raised over ten thousand dollars. On January 5th, Abbie will do her usual Evening Reading program, where she reads her work aloud to people who come and encourages other writers to do the same.

Last year, Abbie read the first two books in the Tracy Gayle mystery series by Trish Hubschman, a fellow author she met through Behind Our Eyes, a writers’ organization. This month, she plans to read the next two books in the series plus a new book of short stories about Tracy Gayle that just came out. Tracy Gayle is a private eye.

Abbie usually doesn’t read detective stories, but these remind her of the Nancy Drew mysteries she read when she was a kid. Now, Nancy Drew has grown up, and the mysteries she solves involve murder, not just thefts of disappearances. There is violence, but it’s not as bad as what you find in other adult mysteries. I’m looking forward to reading these books with her, since she usually listens to them while I’m on her lap in the recliner.

You can learn more about Trish Hubschman’s books here. Abbie reviewed the first two books in the series here and here. Trish will hold a book launch through Behind Our Eyes at the end of the month, and Abbie will help with that.

Two of Abbie’s poems were recently published in the quarterly winter issue of The Avocet. In coming weeks, she’ll feature these here. So, stay tuned.

Abbie will soon be starting a new blog series called Life’s Alphabet. She got the idea from a fellow blogger, Beetley Pete who picked words beginning with consecutive letters of the alphabet and wrote about memories or other things associated with that word. Can you guess what she’s going to write about when she gets to the letter C? Maybe she’ll let me write that post.

A while back, during the ACB community daily schedule call, people were asked to think of a word that sums up 2022 for them. Abbie’s word is “flexible.” When she worked as a registered music therapist with nursing home residents, she had to be flexible. When she cared for her late husband after he suffered two paralyzing strokes, she had to be flexible. So, she has learned not to get upset when the universe laughs at her plans.

I’m so glad. When Abbie first got me in July of last year, she planned to have a cat who would meow and purr and not just turn her head, blink, and stretch. But the universe must have thought her plan was pretty funny. Something went wrong with my voice box in November, and I can no longer meow or purr, at least not consistently. Last week, I was able to talk to Abbie for a while, but that didn’t last long.

Abbie doesn’t care, though. She still loves me, and I look forward to snuggling with her in the recliner whenever she has an opportunity to relax.

Speaking of relaxing, my work is done here. It’s time for me to take a nap while Abbie corrects all my four-pawed typos. Happy New Year, everybody!

 

Abbie wears a blue and white V-neck top with different shades of blue from sky to navy that swirl together with the white. She has short, brown hair and rosy cheeks and smiles at the camera against a black background.

Photo Courtesy of Tess Anderson Photography

Photo Resize and Description by

Two Pentacles Publishing.

 

Abbie, here.If you haven’t already done so, please subscribe to my email list to receive my monthly newsletter and other announcements. This is a one-way announcements list, meaning the only messages you’ll receive will come from me. So, you can rest assured that this list is low-traffic. Send a blank email to:  newsfrommycorner+subscribe@groups.io  You’ll receive a confirmation email. Reply to that with another blank message, and you should be good to go.

 

New! Why Grandma Doesn’t Know Me

Copyright 2021 by Abbie Johnson Taylor.

Independently published with the help of DLD Books.

The cover of the book features an older woman sitting in a wicker chair facing a window. The world beyond the window is bright, and several plants are visible on the terrace. Behind the woman’s chair is another plant, with a tall stalk and wide rounded leaves. The woman has short, white hair, glasses, a red sweater, and tan pants. The border of the picture is a taupe color and reads "Why Grandma Doesn't Know Me" above the photo and "Abbie Johnson Taylor" below it.Photo Resize and Description by

Two Pentacles Publishing.

 

Sixteen-year-old Natalie’s grandmother, suffering from dementia and confined to a wheelchair, lives in a nursing home and rarely recognizes Natalie. But one Halloween night, she tells her a shocking secret that only she and Natalie’s mother know. Natalie is the product of a one-night stand between her mother, who is a college English teacher, and another professor.

After some research, Natalie learns that people with dementia often have vivid memories of past events. Still not wanting to believe what her grandmother has told her, she finds her biological father online. The resemblance between them is undeniable. Not knowing what else to do, she shows his photo and website to her parents.

Natalie realizes she has some growing up to do. Scared and confused, she reaches out to her biological father, and they start corresponding.

Her younger sister, Sarah, senses their parents’ marital difficulties. At Thanksgiving, when she has an opportunity to see Santa Claus, she asks him to bring them together again. Can the jolly old elf grant her request?

***

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5 THINGS I’M NOT GOING TO DO IN 2022 #FridayFinds #Reblogs #Inspiration

Image contains: Abbie, smiling.

What don’t you plan to do in 2022? Read this post I’m sharing today, and see if you can think of five things you won’t do next year. You can either share them here or on the Life’s Fine Whine blog. Happy New Year!

***

With the new year scarily close, we’ve all been sharing our goals for the next year. For this post I thought I would do something slightly different. Instead of sharing things I want to do or achieve in 2022 I thought I would share some things I want to stop doing next year.

 

Read the full post here.

What Did You Do New Year’s Eve #Wednesday Words, #Excerpt

Image contains: Abbie, smiling.

Two months after Bill and I were married in 2005, we decided to toast the new year with French silk pie from Schwan. At a little before midnight, he served us each a slice of this chocolaty, rich dessert. Then, when he tried to put the pie back in the refrigerator, the dish slipped out of his hand, and the pie ended up on our carpeted kitchen floor. Needless to say, when 2006 arrived, we were cleaning bits of chocolate off the rug. We then ate our slices, laughed, and wished each other a happy New Year, unaware of what the new year would bring.

I don’t know why I didn’t include this in My Ideal Partner: How I Met, Married, and Cared for the Man I Loved Despite Debilitating Odds. But the following excerpt explains how Bill and I celebrated our first Christmas and New Year’s after his first debilitating stroke, when he could no longer slice a French silk pie.

***

Christmas was a relatively simple affair compared to Thanksgiving. My uncle and aunt offered to come over on Christmas Day and bring chili. We had no out−of−town relatives visiting, just me, Bill, Dad, Grandma, and my uncle and aunt. It was a nice, quiet holiday. Bill and I rang in the New Year by watching Casablanca.

The past few months were tough at times, but we finally settled into a routine, and I could do most tasks associated with Bill’s care without thinking or worrying too much about them. Bill had recently started outpatient physical and occupational therapy, and I hoped he would develop the strength to do more on his own. However, as we snuggled together in bed after the movie, little did we know what lay ahead.

***

By the way, for those of you who use the National Library Service for the Blind and Print Disabled, The Red Dress is available for download from their site here. No matter how you read it, please be sure to review it wherever you can. That goes for all my books. Thank you for stopping by. Stay safe, happy, and healthy.

New! The Red Dress

Copyright July 2019 by DLD Books

Front cover contains: young, dark-haired woman in red dress holding flowers

When Eve went to her high school senior prom, she wore a red dress that her mother had made for her. That night, after dancing with the boy of her dreams, she caught him in the act with her best friend. Months later, Eve, a freshman in college, is bullied into giving the dress to her roommate. After her mother finds out, their relationship is never the same again.

Twenty-five years later, Eve, a bestselling author, is happily married with three children. Although her mother suffers from dementia, she still remembers, and Eve still harbors the guilt for giving the dress away. When she receives a Facebook friend request from her old college roommate and an invitation to her twenty-five-year high school class reunion, then meets her former best friend by chance, she must confront the past in order to face the future.

***

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Auld Lang Syne #Musical Monday

Image contains: Abbie, smiling.

What am I doing New Year’s Eve? Probably what I do every night, stretch out in my recliner with a good book, magazine, podcast, or movie. What did we do on New Year’s Eve when I was growing up? Not a whole lot.

On rare occasions, we went out to eat, but we usually didn’t stay out late. One year, we lit sparklers in the house when the ball dropped on Times Square. Because December in Wyoming was cold and snowy, we didn’t take them outside. It’s a wonder we didn’t burn the house down.

Then, there was the year Dad got pulled over for drunk driving and would have spent the night in jail if Grandma and Uncle Jon hadn’t bailed him out. You see, because my father sold and serviced coin-operated machines, he was often called on New Year’s Eve and other nights to fix a broken jukebox in a bar where there was no other entertainment. On this particular New Year’s Eve, the establishment to which he was called was in a rural area. And, of course, he stayed after fixing the jukebox and enjoyed one too many. Fortunately, a highway patrolman caught him before he could have an accident.

On New Year’s Day, Mother always insisted on taking down the Christmas tree and other decorations. Although everyone was present when the house was decorated, my father and younger brother often had places to go on New Year’s Day, or they were sleeping it off after a night of celebration. So, the task of un-decorating fell to Mother and me.

I loved taking down ornaments just as much as I loved putting them up, fingering the glass balls and snowmen, angels, and other figurines. Although Mother grumbled about the lack of assistance, I didn’t mind. After everything was taken down and put away, I helped her haul the tree to the alley, where it would eventually be picked up by the sanitation department.

What about you? What do you remember doing on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day when you were growing up?

The song I’m singing today is synonymous with ringing in a new year. According to Wikipedia, “Auld Lang Syne” is a Scottish poem written by Robert Burns in 1788 and set to the tune of a traditional folk song. As I’m sure you all know, its traditional use is to bid farewell to the old year at midnight on New Year’s Eve. But it can also be sung at funerals, graduations, and as an ending to other occasions. The phrase, “Auld Lang Syne,” has been used in similar poems by Robert Ayton (1570-1638) Allan Ramsay, (1686-1757) and James Watson. (1711) It’s loosely translated as “for the sake of old times.” To learn more, click here.

If you know the words to “Auld Lang Syne,” you might want to sing along with me. Whatever you do New Year’s Eve, please keep others safe from the coronavirus by not gathering with a large crowd, and please don’t drink and drive. This post is part of Dr. Crystal Grimes’ holiday blogging party. Happy New Year!

By the way, for those of you who use the National Library Service for the Blind and Print Disabled, The Red Dress is available for download from their site here. No matter how you read it, please be sure to review it wherever you can. That goes for all my books. Thank you for stopping by. Stay safe, happy, and healthy.

New! The Red Dress

Copyright July 2019 by DLD Books

Front cover contains: young, dark-haired woman in red dress holding flowers

When Eve went to her high school senior prom, she wore a red dress that her mother had made for her. That night, after dancing with the boy of her dreams, she caught him in the act with her best friend. Months later, Eve, a freshman in college, is bullied into giving the dress to her roommate. After her mother finds out, their relationship is never the same again.

Twenty-five years later, Eve, a bestselling author, is happily married with three children. Although her mother suffers from dementia, she still remembers, and Eve still harbors the guilt for giving the dress away. When she receives a Facebook friend request from her old college roommate and an invitation to her twenty-five-year high school class reunion, then meets her former best friend by chance, she must confront the past in order to face the future.

***

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TMI Tuesday December 31st 2019

I’m back to end the year with answers to more interesting questions from the TMI Tuesday Blog.

What’s new?

 

Feel free to elaborate.

In 2019 did you

  1. Get a new job? No.
  2. Get a new haircut? No, I’ve gotten several haircuts in the past year, but they’ve always been the same style. I’ve been going to the same beautician for years, and she always remembers how I like my hair. Heaven help me when she retires.
  3. Get a new car? No.
  4. Move? No. I’ve been in the same house for over ten years, and I like it. As long as I don’t need to move, why bother?
  5. Get a new romantic partner? No. I haven’t been romantically involved since my husband passed in 2012, and I doubt I ever will be. You can read more about this in my memoir, My Ideal Partner: How I Met, Married, and Cared for the Man I Loved Despite Debilitating Odds.
  6. Have a kid? No.
  7. Take up a new hobby? No.

In 2020, will you?

  1. Get a new job? No. Why should I? I’ve been content working for myself as a writer for years, and as long as I don’t need the income, why bother?
  2. Get a new car? No. I’m visually impaired, so you don’t want me on the road.
  3. Take a risk? No. I might have when I was younger, but now, I’m set in my ways and prefer my life less complicated.

***

How about you? To join the fun, click here, or you could leave your answers in the comment field below. Happy New Year!

 

New! The Red Dress

Copyright July 2019 by DLD Books

Front cover contains: young, dark-haired woman in red dress holding flowers

When Eve went to her high school senior prom, she wore a red dress that her mother had made for her. That night, after dancing with the boy of her dreams, she caught him in the act with her best friend. Months later, Eve, a freshman in college, is bullied into giving the dress to her roommate. After her mother finds out, their relationship is never the same again.

Twenty-five years later, Eve, a bestselling author, is happily married with three children. Although her mother suffers from dementia, she still remembers, and Eve still harbors the guilt for giving the dress away. When she receives a Facebook friend request from her old college roommate and an invitation to her twenty-five-year high school class reunion, then meets her former best friend by chance, she must confront the past in order to face the future.

***

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My Amazon Author Page

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WebsiteImage contains: Abbie, smiling.