The Earring Debacle #Wednesday Words

When I was thirteen years old, I couldn’t get motivated to do much reading on my own, due to my visual impairment. I preferred to have my mother read to me instead. One book we read together was about a Jewish family in New York who had five girls and one boy. It was part of a series that I believe was called All of a Kind.

One of the girls in the story, who was my age, had her ears pierced. I found this process horrifying and vowed no jeweler would stick my earlobes with a needle just so I could wear earrings. Mother must have thought otherwise, for on the afternoon of Christmas Eve, she bundled my younger brother and me into the car, telling us we needed to do an errand. When I asked her where we were going, she said, “You’ll see.”

At the time, I’d requested, for Christmas, an electric chord organ I’d seen in a department store. So, I thought we were going to purchase it, but how would we get it home in our Mercedes Benz? As Mother pulled into a parking space downtown, she said, “Well, Andy, shall we tell her?”

“Yeah!” my younger brother answered.

Turning to me, as I sat next to her in the front seat, Mother said, “You’re going to get your ears pierced today.”

I was mortified. The last thing I wanted was to have my ears pierced. But I’d been raised to be appreciative of gifts, even when I didn’t want them. So, what could I say?

The jewelry store was packed with exuberant children and harried adults, doing their last-minute Christmas shopping, but I was far from happy. The woman who finally took us into a back room must have been reading my mind because she said, “Hon, are you sure you want to do this?”

I could have said no, but Mother would have gotten mad, and Andy would have called me a chicken. So, I pasted a smile on my face and said yes.

After applying plenty of alcohol to both my earlobes, she did it with a sort of hole-puncher that inserted earrings. It hurt a lot! In order for the holes to stay open, I needed to wear these earrings for at least six months. They had to be turned and alcohol applied to my lobes several times a day, and my earlobes were sore at times. Mother bought me pair after pair of earrings, which I reluctantly but diligently wore. In school, I was envied by other girls who didn’t have pierced ears.

Eventually, my ears became infected, and I had to let them close over, much to my relief and Mother’s consternation. By the way, I did get that electric chord organ for Christmas, and it was one of the best gifts I’d ever received. Now, besides the piano, I had one more instrument I could play.

How about you? What was the worst Christmas present you ever received? Thanks to blogger Stevie Turner for inspiring this. She also asks what was the worst gift you ever gave. I can’t think of any, but maybe you can. If so, you can share your memories in the comment field below or click here to participate in Stevie’s blog hop.

Please note that for the next few days, I’ll be taking a staycation to celebrate Thanksgiving. This means there will be no posts either here or on Facebook Thursday, Friday, Saturday, or Sunday. If you’re in the United States, I hope you have a safe and happy holiday, and will see you back here Monday.

By the way, for those of you who use the National Library Services for the Blind and Print Disabled, The Red Dress is available for download from their site here. No matter how you read it, please be sure to review it wherever you can. That goes for all my books. Thank you for stopping by. Stay safe, happy, and healthy.

New! The Red Dress

Copyright July 2019 by DLD Books

Front cover contains: young, dark-haired woman in red dress holding flowers

When Eve went to her high school senior prom, she wore a red dress that her mother had made for her. That night, after dancing with the boy of her dreams, she caught him in the act with her best friend. Months later, Eve, a freshman in college, is bullied into giving the dress to her roommate. After her mother finds out, their relationship is never the same again.

Twenty-five years later, Eve, a bestselling author, is happily married with three children. Although her mother suffers from dementia, she still remembers, and Eve still harbors the guilt for giving the dress away. When she receives a Facebook friend request from her old college roommate and an invitation to her twenty-five-year high school class reunion, then meets her former best friend by chance, she must confront the past in order to face the future.

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Fall from Grace #Six-Sentence Thursday

I toppled off a foundation in Arizona when I was ten years old. My parents, younger brother, and I were looking at a house that was in the process of being built. There were no walls, windows, or roof, just the floor. I was walking along a narrow ledge, one foot in front of the other, when I lost my balance, landing hard on my left shoulder in some rocks. I don’t know how far I fell, but my shoulder ached for days, causing me to miss at least one day of school. It could have been worse; I was right-handed.

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Thanks to Girlie on the Edge for inspiring the above with her six-sentence prompt for this week. The word is “foundation,” and the idea is to write a poem or story of no more and no less than six sentences, using the word at least once. If you’d like to participate in Girlie on the Edge’s blog hop, click here.

By the way, for those of you who use the National Library Services for the Blind and Print Disabled, The Red Dress is available for download from their site here. No matter how you read it, please be sure to review it wherever you can. That goes for all my books. Thank you for stopping by. Stay safe, happy, and healthy.

New! The Red Dress

Copyright July 2019 by DLD Books

Front cover contains: young, dark-haired woman in red dress holding flowers

When Eve went to her high school senior prom, she wore a red dress that her mother had made for her. That night, after dancing with the boy of her dreams, she caught him in the act with her best friend. Months later, Eve, a freshman in college, is bullied into giving the dress to her roommate. After her mother finds out, their relationship is never the same again.

Twenty-five years later, Eve, a bestselling author, is happily married with three children. Although her mother suffers from dementia, she still remembers, and Eve still harbors the guilt for giving the dress away. When she receives a Facebook friend request from her old college roommate and an invitation to her twenty-five-year high school class reunion, then meets her former best friend by chance, she must confront the past in order to face the future.

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Wind Beneath My Wings #Monday Musical Memories

The song I’m featuring today is one I sang to my late husband Bill. After his death, I realized that he was truly the wind beneath my wings.

If he hadn’t come along and persuaded me to marry him, quit my day job, and write full time, I might still be conducting music activities in nursing homes and other senior facilities. If not for him, I might still be in the apartment where I lived for years instead of in my own house with my own washer and dryer and back yard. If I hadn’t married him, I wouldn’t have five published books under my belt with a sixth on the way.

Bill was one of my biggest fans. He supported all my writing endeavors, even helping me with story ideas. I remember the day I received print copies of my first book, We Shall Overcome. I placed a copy in his hands, and because he had no vision at all, I described the front and back cover to him. With what I imagined to be his shit-eating grin, he said, “My wife, the published author.” When my second book, How to Build a Better Mousetrap: Recollections and Reflections of a Family Caregiver was ready to be published, he posed with me for the photo on the front cover. Whenever possible, he was at my side during book signings and other events, smiling, even though he was confined to a wheelchair as a result of two strokes. You can read more about us in My Ideal Partner: How I met, Married, and Cared for the Man I Loved Despite Debilitating Odds.

On my birthday today, I’d like to give you all the gift of my gratitude to Bill for making me what I am today. Even now, this song is hard for me to sing. But as you’ll note when you press the Play button below, I somehow managed to pull it off. Enjoy!

I was inspired to share this song by a prompt. Thank you for reading.

 

New! The Red Dress

Copyright July 2019 by DLD Books

Front cover contains: young, dark-haired woman in red dress holding flowers

When Eve went to her high school senior prom, she wore a red dress that her mother had made for her. That night, after dancing with the boy of her dreams, she caught him in the act with her best friend. Months later, Eve, a freshman in college, is bullied into giving the dress to her roommate. After her mother finds out, their relationship is never the same again.

Twenty-five years later, Eve, a bestselling author, is happily married with three children. Although her mother suffers from dementia, she still remembers, and Eve still harbors the guilt for giving the dress away. When she receives a Facebook friend request from her old college roommate and an invitation to her twenty-five-year high school class reunion, then meets her former best friend by chance, she must confront the past in order to face the future.

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WebsiteImage contains: Abbie, smiling.

 

Song Lyric Sunday: The Pain of Loving You

Image contains: Abbie, smiling.The theme from newepicauthor this week is “pain.” This song is about loving someone even if that person hurts you all the time. I’m sure victims of domestic violence can identify with this, and I’m thankful I’ve never had such an experience.

 

The Pain of Loving You—Dolly Parton, Linda Ronstadt, and Emmylou Harris

Lyrics Courtesy of Genius

 

Chorus

Oh the pain of loving you
Oh the misery I go through
Never knowing what to do
Oh the pain of loving you

[Verse 1]
You just can’t stand to see me happy
Seems you hurt me all you can
Still I go on loving you
But I never understand

[Chorus]
Oh the pain of loving you
Oh the misery I go through
Never knowing what to do
Oh the pain of loving you

[Verse 2]
To love and hate at the same time
The line between the two is fine
The two have bound me heart and soul
So strong that I can’t let you go

[Chorus]
Oh the pain of loving you
Oh the misery I go through
Never knowing what to do
Oh the pain of loving you
Oh the pain of loving you

 

Songwriters: Porter Wagoner & Dolly Parton

Copyright 2019 Genius Media Group, Inc.

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Note: It’s time for a change. After today, I’ll no longer participate in this challenge, but starting a week from tomorrow, I’ll try something new. It’ll be called “Musical Memory Monday.” I’ll feature either a video or a recording of me singing a particular song. Hopefully, the song will bring up memories, and I’ll ask a question or two about such memories that you can answer in the comment field.

This is similar to an activity I used to do as a registered music therapist with nursing home residents. Our group would sing songs related to a specific topic, and participants would be encouraged to reminisce on this topic.

I’ll no longer link to Jim’s posts, so if you aren’t currently following me, you might want to subscribe by email. That way, you’ll be notified about this and other posts here. I hope you will enjoy this feature as much as the other. If not, I can always go back to doing Song Lyric Sunday, but for now, let’s give this a try, okay?

 

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My Ideal Partner: How I Met, Married, and Cared for the Man I Loved Despite Debilitating Odds

That’s Life: New and Selected Poems

How to Build a better Mousetrap: Recollections and Reflections of a Family Caregiver

We Shall Overcome

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Song Lyric Sunday: Photograph

Song Lyric Sunday was created by Helen Vahdati. If you’re a blogger and would like to participate, click here for guidelines.

This week’s theme is “photograph.” The song I’m featuring below was popular when I started seventh grade, and for some reason, it was going through my head, as I walked to and from the bus stop each day. Its meaning wasn’t clear then. Now, I can relate to its sentiment and am thankful my late husband didn’t choose to just leave me with only a picture to remember him by. Enjoy, and have a great day.

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Disclaimer: I don’t own the rights to these lyrics, and copyright infringement isn’t intentional.

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Photograph–Ringo Starr

Every time I see your face
It reminds me of the places we used to go
But all I’ve got is a photograph
And I realize you’re not coming back anymore
I thought I’d make it
The day you went away
But I can’t make it
Till you come home again to stay
I can’t get used to living here
While my heart is broke, my tears I cry for you
I want you here to have and hold
As the years go by, and we grow old and gray
Now you’re expecting me to live without you
But that’s not something that I’m looking forward to
I can’t get used to living here
While my heart is broke, my tears I cry for you
I want you here to have and hold
As the years go by, and we grow old and gray
Every time I see your face
It reminds me of the places we used to go
But all I’ve got is a photograph
And I realize you’re not coming back anymore
Songwriters: George Harrison / Richard Starkey

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Abbie Johnson Taylor
We Shall Overcome
How to Build a Better Mousetrap: Recollections and Reflections of a Family Caregiver

That’s Life: New and Selected Poems
My Ideal Partner: How I Met, Married, and Cared for the Man I Loved Despite Debilitating Odds
Like Me on Facebook.

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