A Compelling Adventure Story of Forgiveness #Friday Fun Reads

Things You Save in a Fire: A Novel

by Katherine Center

Copyright 2019.

 

What Amazon Says

 

From the New York Times bestselling author of How to Walk Away comes a stunning new novel about courage, hope, and learning to love against all odds.

Cassie Hanwell was born for emergencies. As one of the only female firefighters in her Texas firehouse, she’s seen her fair share of them, and she’s a total pro at other people’s tragedies. But when her estranged and ailing mother asks her to give up her whole life and move to Boston, Cassie suddenly has an emergency of her own.

The tough, old-school Boston firehouse is as different from Cassie’s old job as it could possibly be. Hazing, a lack of funding, and poor facilities mean that the firemen aren’t exactly thrilled to have a “lady” on the crew—even one as competent and smart as Cassie. Except for the infatuation-inspiring rookie, who doesn’t seem to mind having Cassie around. But she can’t think about that. Because love is girly, and it’s not her thing. And don’t forget the advice her old captain gave her: Never date firefighters. Cassie can feel her resolve slipping…and it means risking it all—the only job she’s ever loved, and the hero she’s worked like hell to become.

Katherine Center’s Things You Save in a Fire is a heartfelt and healing tour-de-force about the strength of vulnerability, the nourishing magic of forgiveness, and the life-changing power of defining courage, at last, for yourself.

 

My Thoughts

 

With plenty of riveting action and compelling dialog, this book was hard to put down, especially close to the end. According to the acknowledgements, the author’s husband, a firefighter, helped her with the book.

Two ironies struck me. First of all, most firefighters I’ve met have been nice. But these firemen can make a new crew member’s life miserable, especially if that crew member is a woman.

Also, there seems to be a rule, written or not, that firefighters can’t become romantically involved with other firefighters. Cassie and the rookie are aware of this but eventually no longer able to deny their attraction to each other. It’s interesting to see how they get out of the awkward position in which this places them.

I also enjoyed learning some things about firefighting I hadn’t known before. The ending is satisfying, and I’ll definitely read more of this author’s work.

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By the way, for those of you who use the National Library Services for the Blind and Print Disabled, The Red Dress is available for download from their site here. Thank you for reading. Stay safe, happy, and healthy, and may you always have positive experiences.

New! The Red Dress

Copyright July 2019 by DLD Books

Front cover contains: young, dark-haired woman in red dress holding flowers

When Eve went to her high school senior prom, she wore a red dress that her mother had made for her. That night, after dancing with the boy of her dreams, she caught him in the act with her best friend. Months later, Eve, a freshman in college, is bullied into giving the dress to her roommate. After her mother finds out, their relationship is never the same again.

Twenty-five years later, Eve, a bestselling author, is happily married with three children. Although her mother suffers from dementia, she still remembers, and Eve still harbors the guilt for giving the dress away. When she receives a Facebook friend request from her old college roommate and an invitation to her twenty-five-year high school class reunion, then meets her former best friend by chance, she must confront the past in order to face the future.

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Novel Inspires with Tears and Laughter #Thursday Book Feature

Where Sheep May Safely Graze

by Phyllis Staton Campbell

Copyright 2017

 

What Amazon Says

 

If you’re looking for a book with a blind character, standing high on a pedestal, surrounded by a perfect world, this book isn’t for you. If, however, you’re looking for inspiration laced with laughter and tears, read on. Jim Miller, who was blinded in Iraq, finds his faith tested, as he and his wife, Amy, struggle to adjust to his blindness, and a new marriage. When his congregation forces him to step down, because of his blindness, they accept a church in a mountain town. From there, they look up, and find the will of God.

No, you won’t find a pedestal, but you will find humor as Jim practices his first baptism with a doll, and you will find inspiration as Jim and Amy find their place in the world, and a stronger faith in God. For readers who enjoy the Mitford Series by Jan Karon.

 

My Thoughts

 

I met Phyllis Staton Campbell several years ago when she joined Behind Our Eyes, an organization of disabled writers, of which I’m president. She has published several other books, most of which I enjoyed.

Where Sheep May Safely Graze did not disappoint me. As I read this book, I experienced a wide range of emotions from joy when Jim and Amy were reunited for the first time after his accident, to anger at snooty church officials who didn’t think a blind person could be a pastor. I was moved, almost to tears, when Jim, after losing his sight, seemed to sense when Amy’s face was in front of him and kissed it. My late husband, also totally blind, was like that, too.

Phyllis demonstrates Jim and Amy’s faith in God. But unlike other authors of Christian fiction, she doesn’t let that dominate the story but subtly shows us that God is looking out for her main characters. I love the ending, where Jim and Amy are gazing at a field of sheep. Even if you’re not into Christian fiction, this book will warm your heart and delight you. You’ll also learn that blindness should never stand in a person’s way.

New! The Red Dress

Copyright July 2019 by DLD Books

Front cover contains: young, dark-haired woman in red dress holding flowers

When Eve went to her high school senior prom, she wore a red dress that her mother had made for her. That night, after dancing with the boy of her dreams, she caught him in the act with her best friend. Months later, Eve, a freshman in college, is bullied into giving the dress to her roommate. After her mother finds out, their relationship is never the same again.

Twenty-five years later, Eve, a bestselling author, is happily married with three children. Although her mother suffers from dementia, she still remembers, and Eve still harbors the guilt for giving the dress away. When she receives a Facebook friend request from her old college roommate and an invitation to her twenty-five-year high school class reunion, then meets her former best friend by chance, she must confront the past in order to face the future.

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WebsiteImage contains: Abbie, smiling.

Thursday Book Feature: Novel Depicts World War II Racism

Image contains: Abbie, smiling.Greetings from sunny Florida, where I’m spending quality time with my brother and his family. I’m having too much fun to post a live book review this week. So, here’s a re-run from last year. Enjoy and happy reading.

 

via Thursday Book Feature: Novel Depicts World War II Racism

 

My Books

 

My Ideal Partner: How I Met, Married, and Cared for the Man I Loved Despite Debilitating Odds

That’s Life: New and Selected Poems

How to Build a better Mousetrap: Recollections and Reflections of a Family Caregiver

We Shall Overcome

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Thursday Book Feature: Novel Depicts World War II Racism

Tallgrass: A Novel
by Sandra Dallas
Copyright 2007

In this fictional account of events during World War Ii, an internment camp for evacuated Japanese-American citizens is established in a small Colorado town. Rennie, a thirteen-year-old girl living on her family’s farm adjacent to the camp, tells the story of how these evacuees were transported to the camp and the townspeople’s mixed reactions to their presence. Despite suspicion that one of the camp’s inmates murdered a local girl, Rennie and her family stand up for what’s right.

Her father hires some of the boys to work on the farm. Her mother, skeptical at first, is forced to employ a couple of Japanese girls to help her in the house when she becomes ill. Other sub-plots include Rennie’s brother serving overseas, her best friend, the murdered girl’s sister, and one of the Japanese girls helping in the house. In the acknowledgements at the beginning, the author explains what inspired her to write the book. At the end, she provides historical information and discussion questions for reading groups.

Because I’m not proud of how we treated Japanese-American citizens in the wake of Pearl Harbor, I wouldn’t have read this, but my regional talking book library’s discussion group chose it, so what could I say? I like the way the author tells the story from Rennie’s first person point of view and how she places the girl in situations where she shouldn’t have been in order for her to gleam more of the story. I felt a connection to the setting because my late husband grew up on a farm not too far away during this time. Because the removal and imprisonment of Japanese-American citizens after Pearl Harbor was something I wasn’t aware of until I took a recent U.S. history class during my senior year of high school, this book would be a great way to teach young people about this aspect of World War Ii.

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Abbie Johnson Taylor
We Shall Overcome
How to Build a Better Mousetrap: Recollections and Reflections of a Family Caregiver

That’s Life: New and Selected Poems
My Ideal Partner: How I Met, Married, and Cared for the Man I Loved Despite Debilitating Odds
Like Me on Facebook.

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