Let’s Do This #TMI Tuesday June 16 2020

Here are my answers to this week’s questions. After reading them, you can find out how to participate.

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1. What do you think are the best and worst parts of human nature? The best part is our willingness to help others. The worst part is our temper.

 

2. What is something terrifying that you have come to accept as a fact of life? Even now, in the 21st century, there are plenty of racists in the world. Some of them are police officers who would kill a man simply because he’s black.

 

3. What piece of media (book, movie, TV show, etc.) changed the way you viewed the world? How? When I was in college, I read Ellery Queen’s The Chinese Orange Mystery. Before that, I’d enjoyed Nancy Drew and Trixie Belden mysteries. So, I decided to try something of a more adult nature. This book takes place in the 1930’s when the police were more brutal than they are now.

For a while after reading it, I was terrified of policemen. Years later, this partly inspired my first novel, We Shall Overcome.

4. You must pick one:

– Facebook or Twitter? I prefer Facebook because there doesn’t seem to be a limit on how many characters you can post.

– Cake or Pie? I like cake because it usually doesn’t have a hard crust. But I love pizza, and if the crust’s too hard, I won’t eat it.
– Swimming or Sunbathing? I don’t do much of either one. On the rare occasions when I go to a beach, I usually walk in the water.

– Nice Car or Nice Home Interior? Since I don’t drive, I’ll take the nice home interior, please.

Bonus: If pressing a button meant you received five million dollars, (USD) but it also killed five people somewhere in the world, would you press it? This is a no-brainer. The lives of five innocent people are not worth five million dollars.

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Now, it’s your turn. Click here to learn how to participate. Alternatively, you can answer one or more of the questions in the comment field below. Any way you do it, I look forward to reading your answers.By the way, my latest book The Red Dress, is now available from the National Library Services for the Blind and Print Disabled website. If you use this service, click here.

 

New! The Red Dress

Copyright July 2019 by DLD Books

Front cover contains: young, dark-haired woman in red dress holding flowers

When Eve went to her high school senior prom, she wore a red dress that her mother had made for her. That night, after dancing with the boy of her dreams, she caught him in the act with her best friend. Months later, Eve, a freshman in college, is bullied into giving the dress to her roommate. After her mother finds out, their relationship is never the same again.

Twenty-five years later, Eve, a bestselling author, is happily married with three children. Although her mother suffers from dementia, she still remembers, and Eve still harbors the guilt for giving the dress away. When she receives a Facebook friend request from her old college roommate and an invitation to her twenty-five-year high school class reunion, then meets her former best friend by chance, she must confront the past in order to face the future.

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WebsiteImage contains: Abbie, smiling.

 

 

Novella Weaves Curious Holiday Yarn #Thursday Book Feature

The Happening: A Carol for All Seasons

by John Wahtera

Copyright 1974

 

In a poor, mixed-class neighborhood, Digby, a white, starving artist, lives with a small group of other unfortunate people in a run-down house slated for demolition. Across the street is a church where no one goes anymore. Digby gets an idea and works with the church’s white pastor on a community holiday celebration he calls a “happening.” This event includes fancy lighting, music, a black Santa and more. Digby and the pastor receive unexpected support from an unlikely source in the black community.

Since this book was published in 1974, we have an idea that the story is set sometime before then in an urban environment, but we don’t know exactly when or where. It might have been more helpful for the author to orient readers to time and place in some way.

The ending left a bit to be desired. I would like to have known what happened to at least one of the characters.

The sub-title doesn’t fit the story, implying that it could be enjoyed year-round. Although some Christmas stories could be read anytime, this one definitely is better suited for this time of year. Otherwise, I liked this short but interesting holiday tale.

 

New! The Red Dress

Copyright July 2019 by DLD Books

Front cover contains: young, dark-haired woman in red dress holding flowers

When Eve went to her high school senior prom, she wore a red dress that her mother had made for her. That night, after dancing with the boy of her dreams, she caught him in the act with her best friend. Months later, Eve, a freshman in college, is bullied into giving the dress to her roommate. After her mother finds out, their relationship is never the same again.

Twenty-five years later, Eve, a bestselling author, is happily married with three children. Although her mother suffers from dementia, she still remembers, and Eve still harbors the guilt for giving the dress away. When she receives a Facebook friend request from her old college roommate and an invitation to her twenty-five-year high school class reunion, then meets her former best friend by chance, she must confront the past in order to face the future.

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My Books

My Amazon Author Page

Facebook

WebsiteImage contains: Abbie, smiling.

Thursday Book Feature: Novel Depicts World War II Racism

Image contains: Abbie, smiling.Greetings from sunny Florida, where I’m spending quality time with my brother and his family. I’m having too much fun to post a live book review this week. So, here’s a re-run from last year. Enjoy and happy reading.

 

via Thursday Book Feature: Novel Depicts World War II Racism

 

My Books

 

My Ideal Partner: How I Met, Married, and Cared for the Man I Loved Despite Debilitating Odds

That’s Life: New and Selected Poems

How to Build a better Mousetrap: Recollections and Reflections of a Family Caregiver

We Shall Overcome

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Thursday Book Feature: Novel Depicts World War II Racism

Tallgrass: A Novel
by Sandra Dallas
Copyright 2007

In this fictional account of events during World War Ii, an internment camp for evacuated Japanese-American citizens is established in a small Colorado town. Rennie, a thirteen-year-old girl living on her family’s farm adjacent to the camp, tells the story of how these evacuees were transported to the camp and the townspeople’s mixed reactions to their presence. Despite suspicion that one of the camp’s inmates murdered a local girl, Rennie and her family stand up for what’s right.

Her father hires some of the boys to work on the farm. Her mother, skeptical at first, is forced to employ a couple of Japanese girls to help her in the house when she becomes ill. Other sub-plots include Rennie’s brother serving overseas, her best friend, the murdered girl’s sister, and one of the Japanese girls helping in the house. In the acknowledgements at the beginning, the author explains what inspired her to write the book. At the end, she provides historical information and discussion questions for reading groups.

Because I’m not proud of how we treated Japanese-American citizens in the wake of Pearl Harbor, I wouldn’t have read this, but my regional talking book library’s discussion group chose it, so what could I say? I like the way the author tells the story from Rennie’s first person point of view and how she places the girl in situations where she shouldn’t have been in order for her to gleam more of the story. I felt a connection to the setting because my late husband grew up on a farm not too far away during this time. Because the removal and imprisonment of Japanese-American citizens after Pearl Harbor was something I wasn’t aware of until I took a recent U.S. history class during my senior year of high school, this book would be a great way to teach young people about this aspect of World War Ii.

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Abbie Johnson Taylor
We Shall Overcome
How to Build a Better Mousetrap: Recollections and Reflections of a Family Caregiver

That’s Life: New and Selected Poems
My Ideal Partner: How I Met, Married, and Cared for the Man I Loved Despite Debilitating Odds
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Saturday Song: We Shall Overcome by Joan Baez

In light of events in Charlottesville, Virginia, last weekend, this song offers hope that maybe someday, we can overcome bigotry and hatred and live in peace. The name also happens to be the title of my first book. Despite all the violence in the world, I hope you can have a great Saturday.

 

 

Author Abbie Johnson Taylor

We Shall Overcome

How to Build a Better Mousetrap: Recollections and Reflections of a Family Caregiver

That’s Life: New and Selected Poems

My Ideal Partner: How I Met, Married, and Cared for the Man I Loved Despite Debilitating Odds

Click to hear an audio trailer.

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