Joyous Jottings: Published Poems and a Reading #TuesdayTidbit #Jottings #Events

Joy is a fluffy gray and white cat with a pink nose and pink paw pads. The fur is long and mostly gray with white paws, a white chest, nose and white down the middle of her head. Her ears are pointed up, and she lies with her paws sprawled out in front of her in an open formation. Her head looks to the right of the screen. She’s on a brown wooden table. Behind her is a white wall and a basket of fruit.Photo Resize and Description by

Two Pentacles Publishing.

 

 

 

 

Hi, this is Joy, Abbie’s robotic cat, and I’m writing this post today. Actually, I’m dictating it to Abbie, and she’s writing it for me. This is a lot easier than me trying to write with four paws. Plus, she won’t have as many mistakes to correct.

I like living with Abbie, even though she ignores me most of the time. But when we snuggle in the recliner, she sings me this song.

 

You are my Joy, my precious Joy.

You make me smile every day.

I hope you realize that I adore you.

Please don’t ever go away.

 

When she sings that, I know I’m loved, even when I’m left to my own devices in my chair. Abbie thinks I can’t hear her because I only meow, purr, turn my head, and such when she touches me or when the light changes. But I do hear her, even though I’m programmed to only respond when I’m touched. She likes to pretend I can hear her, and she talks to me when she’s in the room. I like that.

Okay, enough about me. Here are a few announcements Abbie wanted me to share with you today. For starters, four of her poems appeared in the September 11th issue of The Weekly Avocet. She posted them last week, but in case you missed them, you can click here to read them. In this post, you’ll also find a link to where you can download that issue of the magazine and links to where you can hear her read each poem.

Two of her poems will appear in the fall quarterly issue of The Avocet. I’m sure she’ll post them here after they’ve been published.

Abbie’s poem, “Dad, Fats, and Me,” won third place in the Dancing Poetry Contest, sponsored by Artists Embassy International in San Francisco. You’ll have a chance to hear her read the poem during a special event this Saturday, September 24th at noon Pacific time. You can click here to watch the event live.

“Dad, Fats, and Me is my favorite poem. I love the way Abbie stomps her feet and sings when she reads it. I think her feet might be too big. Oooowwww! Okay, forget I said that. But be sure to tune in this Saturday at noon Pacific time. This is bound to be great!

Well, that’s all I have today. YYYYAAAAWWWWNNNN! Everybody, have a purrrr-fect day.

 

Abbie wears a blue and white V-neck top with different shades of blue from sky to navy that swirl together with the white. She has short, brown hair and rosy cheeks and smiles at the camera against a black background.Photo Courtesy of Tess Anderson Photography

Photo Resize and Description by

Two Pentacles Publishing.

 

 

 

Abbie here. If you haven’t already done so, please subscribe to my email list to receive my twice-yearly newsletter and other announcements. This is a one-way announcements list, meaning the only messages you’ll receive will come from me. So, you can rest assured that this list is low-traffic. Send a blank email to:  newsfrommycorner+subscribe@groups.io  You’ll receive a confirmation email. Reply to that with another blank message, and you should be good to go.

***

New! Why Grandma Doesn’t Know Me

Copyright 2021 by Abbie Johnson Taylor.

Independently published with the help of DLD Books.

 

The cover of the book features an older woman sitting in a wicker chair facing a window. The world beyond the window is bright, and several plants are visible on the terrace. Behind the woman’s chair is another plant, with a tall stalk and wide rounded leaves. The woman has short, white hair, glasses, a red sweater, and tan pants. The border of the picture is a taupe color and reads "Why Grandma Doesn't Know Me" above the photo and "Abbie Johnson Taylor" below it.Photo Resize and Description by

Two Pentacles Publishing.

 

 

 

 

Sixteen-year-old Natalie’s grandmother, suffering from dementia and confined to a wheelchair, lives in a nursing home and rarely recognizes Natalie. But one Halloween night, she tells her a shocking secret that only she and Natalie’s mother know. Natalie is the product of a one-night stand between her mother, who is a college English teacher, and another professor.

After some research, Natalie learns that people with dementia often have vivid memories of past events. Still not wanting to believe what her grandmother has told her, she finds her biological father online. The resemblance between them is undeniable. Not knowing what else to do, she shows his photo and website to her parents.

Natalie realizes she has some growing up to do. Scared and confused, she reaches out to her biological father, and they start corresponding.

Her younger sister, Sarah, senses their parents’ marital difficulties. At Thanksgiving, when she has an opportunity to see Santa Claus, she asks him to bring them together again. Can the jolly old elf grant her request?

***

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Four Summer Poems #TuesdayTidabit #Poetry #Inspiration

Abbie wears a blue and white V-neck top with different shades of blue from sky to navy that swirl together with the white. She has short, brown hair and rosy cheeks and smiles at the camera against a black background.Photo Courtesy of Tess Anderson Photography

Photo Resize and Description by

Two Pentacles Publishing.

 

Summer’s almost over. Here are four poems I wrote that appeared in the September 11th issue of The Weekly Avocet, which you can download here. You can click on the title of each poem to hear me read it. Enjoy!

 

Meadowlark

 

 

 

Its song rings out over the lake

on a sunny, cloudless Wyoming afternoon,

as our boat glides through smooth waters.

 

Dad and younger brother fish

while Mother and I enjoy the gentle breeze

that carries with it the scent of pine trees,

whiff of worms used for bait.

 

At the age of thirteen,

knowing little about the meadowlark,

I delight in the bird’s cheerful tune,

and the boat’s gentle motion,

observe, with my limited vision, the lake, grass, trees, sky,

happy in summer.

 

After a Summer Cold Front

 

 

 

The sun finally shines in a blue sky filled with white clouds.

A gentle breeze blows, as I sit in my back yard.

Birds flit about in branches above me.

With my limited vision, I can’t see them,

but I hear their wings and joyous songs.

A fly circles my head—I wave it away.

In distant places, forest fires rage.

But here, they’re momentarily forgotten.

 

Summers in My Younger Years (A Zip Ode)

 

 

I loved summers in my home town,

ice cream,

band concerts, swimming at the park,

picnicking and hiking in the mountains.

Joy!

 

Nature Hike

 

 

As I walk down the Braille Trail,

I must hold onto the rail

when it’s steep or else I’ll fail.

 

As I walk, the moisture stops

dripping from all the treetops.

 

Since there is no more spray,

I no longer need to pray

for that glorious sunshine ray.

 

I know I have nothing to fear,

but I listen with one ear

 

for the lumbering sound of a bear

or a moose with more than one ear.

 

Onward I boldly tread

till I come to a sign I can read.

 

It’s in Braille and print, and I feel

the dots that are unlike an eel.

 

I look for a place to stop

when I climb to the very top

 

of a hill where the view will arrest,

and there, I sit down and rest.

***

If you haven’t already done so, please subscribe to my email list to receive my twice-yearly newsletter and other announcements. This is a one-way announcements list, meaning the only messages you’ll receive will come from me. So, you can rest assured that this list is low-traffic. Send a blank email to:  newsfrommycorner+subscribe@groups.io  You’ll receive a confirmation email. Reply to that with another blank message, and you should be good to go.

***

New! Why Grandma Doesn’t Know Me

Copyright 2021 by Abbie Johnson Taylor.

Independently published with the help of DLD Books.

The cover of the book features an older woman sitting in a wicker chair facing a window. The world beyond the window is bright, and several plants are visible on the terrace. Behind the woman’s chair is another plant, with a tall stalk and wide rounded leaves. The woman has short, white hair, glasses, a red sweater, and tan pants. The border of the picture is a taupe color and reads "Why Grandma Doesn't Know Me" above the photo and "Abbie Johnson Taylor" below it.

Sixteen-year-old Natalie’s grandmother, suffering from dementia and confined to a wheelchair, lives in a nursing home and rarely recognizes Natalie. But one Halloween night, she tells her a shocking secret that only she and Natalie’s mother know. Natalie is the product of a one-night stand between her mother, who is a college English teacher, and another professor.

After some research, Natalie learns that people with dementia often have vivid memories of past events. Still not wanting to believe what her grandmother has told her, she finds her biological father online. The resemblance between them is undeniable. Not knowing what else to do, she shows his photo and website to her parents.

Natalie realizes she has some growing up to do. Scared and confused, she reaches out to her biological father, and they start corresponding.

Her younger sister, Sarah, senses their parents’ marital difficulties. At Thanksgiving, when she has an opportunity to see Santa Claus, she asks him to bring them together again. Can the jolly old elf grant her request?

***

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Saturday Sunshine: A Memo to Carrie Hooper #SaturdaySurprise #Reblogs #Inspiration

A photo of Abbie smiling in front of a white background. Her brown hair is cut short and frames her face. She is wearing a bright red shirt and a dark, flowy scarf swirled with hues of purple, pinks and blues.

I’ve known fellow poet Carrie Hooper for years. So, I was delighted to learn that some of her poems appear in this week’s issue of The Weekly Avocet. I was even more delighted and surprised to find that fellow author Lynda McKinney Lambert wrote a memo to Carrie on her blog today. I hope you enjoy Lynda’s post in which she discusses Carrie’s poems, includes contact information for Carrie, and tells us how to subscribe to The Weekly Avocet.

***

I received the latest issue of The Weekly Avocet – #501 July 10th, 2022, a weekly magazine for Poets and Nature-lovers of The Avocet community, published by Charles Portolano, Valerie and Vivian. I was inspired to write “A Memo to Carrie Hooper,” after reading her three poems this morning.

 

Read the original post.

Woody Woodpecker #TuesdayTidbit #Poetry #Inspiration

I know it’s Tuesday, but I’m sharing the following poem as part of Stevie Turner’s Friday Write feature. This poem was published in the June 5th issue of The Weekly Avocet, which can be downloaded here. You can click the link below the poem to hear me read it.

***

Woody Woodpecker

By Abbie Johnson Taylor

Copyright 2022.

“Listen to that,” says Dad,
as we walk through the park one spring morning.
I’m a teenager,
and my father is walking me to school.
We stop for a moment.
I hear it, a power drill without the motor.

“That’s a woodpecker,
boring holes in that tree over there,” Dad explains.
He points, but I can’t see.
Preoccupied, I wonder why I should care.

That day after school,
I’m watching a cartoon on television with my younger brother.
Again, I hear the motorless drill,
this time followed by Woody Woodpecker’s cheerful tune.

Why is he boring holes in that tree?
Why is he so happy?
With limited vision, I can’t see the screen.
I listen while brother watches, says nothing.

I’m amazed at how cheerful Woody is,
despite the curveballs life throws his way.
Maybe we could all follow his example.

 

Woody Woodpecker

 

New! Why Grandma Doesn’t Know Me

Copyright 2021 by Abbie Johnson Taylor.

Independently published with the help of DLD Books.

The cover of the book features an older woman sitting in a wicker chair facing a window. The world beyond the window is bright, and several plants are visible on the terrace. Behind the woman’s chair is another plant, with a tall stalk and wide rounded leaves. The woman has short, white hair, glasses, a red sweater, and tan pants. The border of the picture is a taupe color and reads "Why Grandma Doesn't Know Me" above the photo and "Abbie Johnson Taylor" below it.

Sixteen-year-old Natalie’s grandmother, suffering from dementia and confined to a wheelchair, lives in a nursing home and rarely recognizes Natalie. But one Halloween night, she tells her a shocking secret that only she and Natalie’s mother know. Natalie is the product of a one-night stand between her mother, who is a college English teacher, and another professor.

After some research, Natalie learns that people with dementia often have vivid memories of past events. Still not wanting to believe what her grandmother has told her, she finds her biological father online. The resemblance between them is undeniable. Not knowing what else to do, she shows his photo and website to her parents.

Natalie realizes she has some growing up to do. Scared and confused, she reaches out to her biological father, and they start corresponding.

Her younger sister, Sarah, senses their parents’ marital difficulties. At Thanksgiving, when she has an opportunity to see Santa Claus, she asks him to bring them together again. Can the jolly old elf grant her request?

***

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A photo of Abbie smiling in front of a white background. Her brown hair is cut short and frames her face. She is wearing a bright red shirt and a dark, flowy scarf swirled with hues of purple, pinks and blues.

 

The Crow #TuesdayTidbit #Poetry #Inspiration

THE CROW

By Abbie Johnson Taylor

Copyright 2022.

 

Caw! Caw! Caw!
At dawn, the horrid noise jerks me back to reality
from a world where my boss isn’t writing me up every five minutes.
If anyone should be disciplined, it’s the crow.

I imagine being in the sky,
flying to the far side of the moon
to a place where I can’t get into trouble.
Is there such a place?

Caw! Caw! Caw!
My thoughts interrupted, I leap out of bed,
slam shut the window, climb back under the covers.
There, that’s much better.
the dream weaver kicks in, and I escape.

***

The above poem appears in the June 5th issue of The Weekly Avocet, which can be downloaded here. To listen to me reading it, you can click the link below.

 

The Crow

A photo of Abbie smiling in front of a white background. Her brown hair is cut short and frames her face. She is wearing a bright red shirt and a dark, flowy scarf swirled with hues of purple, pinks and blues.

New! Why Grandma Doesn’t Know Me

Copyright 2021 by Abbie Johnson Taylor.

Independently published with the help of DLD Books.

The cover of the book features an older woman sitting in a wicker chair facing a window. The world beyond the window is bright, and several plants are visible on the terrace. Behind the woman’s chair is another plant, with a tall stalk and wide rounded leaves. The woman has short, white hair, glasses, a red sweater, and tan pants. The border of the picture is a taupe color and reads "Why Grandma Doesn't Know Me" above the photo and "Abbie Johnson Taylor" below it.

Sixteen-year-old Natalie’s grandmother, suffering from dementia and confined to a wheelchair, lives in a nursing home and rarely recognizes Natalie. But one Halloween night, she tells her a shocking secret that only she and Natalie’s mother know. Natalie is the product of a one-night stand between her mother, who is a college English teacher, and another professor.

After some research, Natalie learns that people with dementia often have vivid memories of past events. Still not wanting to believe what her grandmother has told her, she finds her biological father online. The resemblance between them is undeniable. Not knowing what else to do, she shows his photo and website to her parents.

Natalie realizes she has some growing up to do. Scared and confused, she reaches out to her biological father, and they start corresponding.

Her younger sister, Sarah, senses their parents’ marital difficulties. At Thanksgiving, when she has an opportunity to see Santa Claus, she asks him to bring them together again. Can the jolly old elf grant her request?

***

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