A giveaway and book Review, October 14, 2021 #Reblogs

Image contains: Abbie, smiling.Thanks to fellow blogger Carol Farnsworth for her great review of my latest book, Why Grandma Doesn’t Know Me. You’ll also find, in her post, instructions on how you can win a free signed copy of her poetry collection, Leaf Memories, which I reviewed here at: https://abbiescorner.wordpress.com/2021/08/13/nature-poetry-for-all-seasons-fridayfunreads/ Happy reading! To learn more about my new novel and find out where to get your copy, visit:  https://www.abbiejohnsontaylor.com

traveling up and down the blind highway of lifeBlind on the Lite Side

I am sitting here at my desk after finishing a fellow author’s book, “Why Grandma Doesn’t Know Me.” But first , I want to tell you of an opportunity to put your name in for a drawing for my signed chapbook,”Leaf Memories.” Go to

http://www.handyuncappedpen.com/2021/10/giveaway-leaf-memories-by-carol.html

Just go to the site of the Handy uncapped pen and write a comment or put your name and email under the cover photo of Leaf Memories, to have your name in the drawing. While you are there, check out this blog source for writers with disabilities.

Now to my review of Abbie Taylor’s newest novel. The title refers to one of the characters, a Grandma with dementia . She fails to recognize one of her grandaughters. In a moment of clarity, she reveals a family secret that threatens to change the family forever.

I was in the room with Natalie when her Grandma in…

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Playing Ball with the Dog #SixSentenceStoryThursdayLinkUp #Excerpt

Image contains: Abbie, smiling.

At the park, we took turns throwing the ball for Squeakers, who never tired of retrieving it and bringing it back to us. I got some good pictures of him and even made a little video of him barking at a squirrel he’d chased up a tree.

“Sarah will love this,” I said when I showed it to the others.

“Last night,” said Grandpa, “the way you said that Miss Sarah had appendicitis, I thought you were going to be a doctor. But you’d also make a pretty good photographer.”

“Last night, you said you wanted to be a writer,” said Grandma.

***

So, is Natalie’s diagnosis of Sarah’s condition correct? Why did she tell her grandmother she wanted to be a writer? You’ll find the answers to these questions in my new novel, Why Grandma Doesn’t Know Me.

Thanks to Girlie on the Edge for inspiring the above excerpt with her six-sentence story prompt for this week. You can participate in this week’s hop and read other bloggers’ six-sentence creations by clicking here.

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New! Why Grandma Doesn’t Know Me

Copyright 2021 by Abbie Johnson Taylor.

Independently published with the help of DLD Books.

Front cover image contains: elderly woman in red sweater sitting next to a window.

Sixteen-year-old Natalie’s grandmother, suffering from dementia and confined to a wheelchair, lives in a nursing home and rarely recognizes Natalie. But one Halloween night, she tells her a shocking secret that only she and Natalie’s mother know. Natalie is the product of a one-night stand between her mother, who is a college English teacher, and another professor.

After some research, Natalie learns that people with dementia often have vivid memories of past events. Still not wanting to believe what her grandmother has told her, she finds her biological father online. The resemblance between them is undeniable. Not knowing what else to do, she shows his photo and website to her parents.

Natalie realizes she has some growing up to do. Scared and confused, she reaches out to her biological father, and they start corresponding.

Her younger sister, Sarah, senses their parents’ marital difficulties. At Thanksgiving, when she has an opportunity to see Santa Claus, she asks him to bring them together again. Can the jolly old elf grant her request?

***

Books

My Amazon Author Page

Facebook

Website

 

 

A Chat with Natalie #WednesdayWords

Image contains: Abbie, smiling.

As I’m sure you’re aware, my new novel, Why Grandma Doesn’t Know Me, has just been released and is now available in paperback and eBook formats from Amazon, Smashwords, and other online retailers. Today, I sat down with Natalie, one of my main characters. AT sixteen years old, she learned from her grandmother that the man she thought was her biological dad wasn’t. Let’s see what she has to say.

***

Me: Natalie, thank you so much for taking time out of your busy schedule to talk to me today.

Natalie:  Sure. Whatever.

Me: What do you think about when you’re trying to fall asleep?

Natalie: Well, I guess I could say that although it was a shock, finding out about my real dad, I think how lucky I am to have two dads when some kids don’t even have one.

Me: That works. Do you have a hiding place?

Natalie: No, not really. The only thing I’ve ever hidden is the fact that I emailed my real dad after my grandmother told me about him and I told my parents I knew about him. But eventually, that came out. We’ve been keeping in touch ever since.

Me: Okay, if they make a movie about your life, what actor might play you?

Natalie: How about Britney Spears? I felt sorry for her when I heard that her dad controlled every aspect of her adult life and was glad when a judge took away his power of attorney or whatever it was. None of my dads would ever do that to me. If she were to play me in a movie, she could learn what it’s like to be in a loving family environment.

Me: That’s a good point. So, what’s the first possession you would save from a fire?

Natalie: My iPhone. I need to  be able to keep in touch with family and friends and especially my real dad.

Me: That’s nice. What’s one of the worst things you’ve ever done?

Natalie: That’s a no-brainer. Telling my parents I knew Grandma’s secret. I thought for sure that Daryl, the man I thought was my real dad, would divorce my mom for having a one-night stand with my biological dad. If only I hadn’t opened my big mouth.

Me: I know how you feel. Let’s not think about that now. Tell me. Do you envy anyone?

Natalie: No, not even Britney Spears. She’s had a hard life.

Me: I agree with that. Speaking of Britney, do you sing or dance when you’re by yourself?

Natalie: No, not really.

Me: Okay, what false impression might other people have about you?

Natalie: What kind of question is that? I don’t think anybody has a false impression of me.

Me: All right. I’m sorry. We’ll talk about something else. What’s a memory that you cherish like a treasure?

Natalie: Hmm, let’s see. Well, when I was little, Mom usually read to me at night before I went to sleep. I learned later that my favorite bedtime story was written by my biological dad.

Me: That’s interesting. Now, one last question. What’s something you usually lie about?

Natalie: Well, I don’t lie about anything anymore, but I used to lie about whether I did my homework or even having homework to do. But since I met my real dad, I decided I want to be a better person.

Me: Well, Natalie, thank you again for chatting with me today.

Natalie: You’re welcome. I wasn’t sure I wanted to do this interview, but it was kind of fun.

***

New! Why Grandma Doesn’t Know Me

Copyright 2021 by Abbie Johnson Taylor.

Independently published with the help of DLD Books.

Front cover image contains: elderly woman in red sweater sitting next to a window.

Sixteen-year-old Natalie’s grandmother, suffering from dementia and confined to a wheelchair, lives in a nursing home and rarely recognizes Natalie. But one Halloween night, she tells her a shocking secret that only she and Natalie’s mother know. Natalie is the product of a one-night stand between her mother, who is a college English teacher, and another professor.

After some research, Natalie learns that people with dementia often have vivid memories of past events. Still not wanting to believe what her grandmother has told her, she finds her biological father online. The resemblance between them is undeniable. Not knowing what else to do, she shows his photo and website to her parents.

Natalie realizes she has some growing up to do. Scared and confused, she reaches out to her biological father, and they start corresponding.

Her younger sister, Sarah, senses their parents’ marital difficulties. At Thanksgiving, when she has an opportunity to see Santa Claus, she asks him to bring them together again. Can the jolly old elf grant her request?

***

Books

My Amazon Author Page

Facebook

Website

 

 

Dropping Bombs in Literature #OpenBookBlogHop #Excerpt

Image contains: Abbie, smiling.

Welcome to another edition of Open Book Blog Hop. This week’s question is: “How do you feel about the use of profanity, either in your stories or in what you read?

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I have no sympathy for a character, especially a main character, who frequently  speaks colorful language. Last year, I started a book in which the first-person narrator dropped an F bomb in every other sentence.

Needless to say, I didn’t get very far in that book. I suppose some people talk that way, but it isn’t pretty and isn’t necessary except under certain circumstances.

Let’s take, for example, the following passage from my forthcoming novel, Why Grandma Doesn’t Know Me. Daryl is, for the most part, a devout Catholic, not in the habit of swearing. He goes to Mass regularly with his family, and his children have attended parochial schools.

In the scene I’m about to share, he has been trying to work in his law office while grappling with the idea that his wife lied to him about his sixteen-year-old daughter not being his biological child. Then, his wife calls with more bad news, and down comes an S bomb.

***

I managed to muddle through somehow until about 12:30, when Marti called.

“They’re closing the girls’ schools early because of the storm. I locked the house when I left, thinking I’d be home before them, but I still have my one o’clock class, and our department chair suddenly scheduled a meeting for 4 p.m.”

“Oh, shit!” I said, staring out my window at swirling snow.

***

How about you? What do you think about characters who utter profanities? You can sound off in the comment field below or click here to participate in this week’s hop and read what others have to say.

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For those of you who use the National Library Service for the Blind and Print Disabled, The Red Dress is available for download from their site here. No matter how you read it, please be sure to review it wherever you can. That goes for all my books. Thank you for stopping by. Stay safe, happy, and healthy.

***

New! The Red Dress

Copyright July 2019 by DLD Books

Front cover contains: young, dark-haired woman in red dress holding flowers

When Eve went to her high school senior prom, she wore a red dress that her mother had made for her. That night, after dancing with the boy of her dreams, she caught him in the act with her best friend. Months later, Eve, a freshman in college, is bullied into giving the dress to her roommate. After her mother finds out, their relationship is never the same again.

Twenty-five years later, Eve, a bestselling author, is happily married with three children. Although her mother suffers from dementia, she still remembers, and Eve still harbors the guilt for giving the dress away. When she receives a Facebook friend request from her old college roommate and an invitation to her twenty-five-year high school class reunion, then meets her former best friend by chance, she must confront the past in order to face the future.

***

Books

My Amazon Author Page

Facebook

Website

 

 

Writing Disabled Characters #OpenBookBlogHop

Image contains: Abbie, smiling.

Welcome to another edition of Open Book Blog Hop. This week’s question is: “Do you write diverse characters? If so, how do you avoid cultural insensitivity?”

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The only diverse characters I’ve written are those with disabilities. In my first novel, We Shall Overcome, my main character, Lisa, is visually impaired. She falls in love with a policeman whose sister is also visually impaired. Lisa participates in a support group for the visually impaired, which consists mostly of senior citizens.

In The Red Dress, Eve, my main character, has a sister-in-law, Polly, who is blind. Although Polly doesn’t appear in the novel, she is mentioned. She lives independently and works as a computer programmer. Also, Eve’s mother, who lives in a nursing home, is confined to a wheelchair and suffers from dementia. My new novel due out this fall, Why Grandma Doesn’t Know Me, is centered around a grandmother, who also lives in a nursing home and is confined to a wheelchair and also suffers from dementia.

For fifteen years, I worked as a registered music therapist with nursing home residents, most of whom suffered from dementia. I facilitated a support group for visually impaired adults, which has consisted mostly of senior citizens. I used these experiences, along with those associated with my own visual impairment, to portray these characters as realistically as possible.

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If you’re a blogger, you can click here to participate in this week’s hop and read what others have to say.

***

For those of you who use the National Library Service for the Blind and Print Disabled, The Red Dress is available for download from their site here. No matter how you read it, please be sure to review it wherever you can. That goes for all my books. Thank you for stopping by. Stay safe, happy, and healthy.

***

New! The Red Dress

Copyright July 2019 by DLD Books

Image contains: young, dark-haired woman in red dress holding flowers

When Eve went to her high school senior prom, she wore a red dress that her mother had made for her. That night, after dancing with the boy of her dreams, she caught him in the act with her best friend. Months later, Eve, a freshman in college, is bullied into giving the dress to her roommate. After her mother finds out, their relationship is never the same again.

Twenty-five years later, Eve, a bestselling author, is happily married with three children. Although her mother suffers from dementia, she still remembers, and Eve still harbors the guilt for giving the dress away. When she receives a Facebook friend request from her old college roommate and an invitation to her twenty-five-year high school class reunion, then meets her former best friend by chance, she must confront the past in order to face the future.

***

Books

My Amazon Author Page

Facebook

Website