From Medicine to Music to Writing #MondayMusings #OpenBookBlogHop #Inspiration

Abbie wears a blue and white V-neck top with different shades of blue from sky to navy that swirl together with the white. She has short, brown hair and rosy cheeks and smiles at the camera against a black background.

Photo Courtesy of Tess Anderson Photography

 

 

Welcome to another edition of Open Book Blog Hop. This week’s question is: “Do you think the child you were would be impressed by the person you’ve become?

My child self wanted to be, among other things, a paramedic, after watching Emergency on television. She also considered being a nurse. So, she’s probably asking me, “What are you doing sitting in front of a computer when you could be speeding off in a fire engine to help a little girl whose hand is caught in a swimming pool drain? I must admit I steered clear of swimming pool drains after seeing that episode, but I digress.

Having limited vision would make rescuing people and providing medical attention tricky, to say the least. Now, of course, there are blood pressure monitors and other devices that talk. But there’s no technology that can tell you where a person is bleeding or what sort of injury a person has.

That was one thing I disliked about being my late husband’s caregiver. The typical man, he didn’t tell me if anything hurt or if he had a skin lesion. When aides from the local home care service who helped him take showers pointed anything out to us, he just brushed it off. You can read more about that in My Ideal Partner. But I’m digressing again.

In eighth grade, when I threw up after dissecting dead frogs in science class, I realized a medical career wasn’t for me. In college, while majoring in music therapy, I was required to take a physiological psychology class where we cut up dead sheep brains. Why would a music therapist need to know the parts of a sheep’s brain? Did I really want to be a music therapist? I should have been affronted when the instructor waived my lab requirement because of my visual impairment, but I was relieved.

My younger self should be proud of me for the fifteen years I worked as a music therapist with nursing home residents. Okay, so I wasn’t using a chain saw to remove a little girl’s hand from a swimming pool drain, but sing-alongs, name that tune, and musical memories brought smiles to many faces, and I’m pretty sure that little girl in the swimming pool wasn’t happy. Now, I entertain and inspire others by putting words on paper, and frankly, I don’t care what my child self thinks.

How about you? Would your child self approve of what you’re doing with your life now? You can click here to participate in this week’s hop and read what others have to say.

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New! Why Grandma Doesn’t Know Me

Copyright 2021 by Abbie Johnson Taylor.

Independently published with the help of DLD Books.

The cover of the book features an older woman sitting in a wicker chair facing a window. The world beyond the window is bright, and several plants are visible on the terrace. Behind the woman’s chair is another plant, with a tall stalk and wide rounded leaves. The woman has short, white hair, glasses, a red sweater, and tan pants. The border of the picture is a taupe color and reads "Why Grandma Doesn't Know Me" above the photo and "Abbie Johnson Taylor" below it.

Sixteen-year-old Natalie’s grandmother, suffering from dementia and confined to a wheelchair, lives in a nursing home and rarely recognizes Natalie. But one Halloween night, she tells her a shocking secret that only she and Natalie’s mother know. Natalie is the product of a one-night stand between her mother, who is a college English teacher, and another professor.

After some research, Natalie learns that people with dementia often have vivid memories of past events. Still not wanting to believe what her grandmother has told her, she finds her biological father online. The resemblance between them is undeniable. Not knowing what else to do, she shows his photo and website to her parents.

Natalie realizes she has some growing up to do. Scared and confused, she reaches out to her biological father, and they start corresponding.

Her younger sister, Sarah, senses their parents’ marital difficulties. At Thanksgiving, when she has an opportunity to see Santa Claus, she asks him to bring them together again. Can the jolly old elf grant her request?

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A Name Honoring my Family and Husband #OpenBookBlogHop #WednesdayWords #Inspiration

Image contains: Abbie, smiling.

Welcome to another edition of Open Book Blog Hop. This week’s question is: “Did you write under a pseudonym? Why?

 

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I’ve never written under a pseudonym per se, but the name under which my books are published is slightly different from my legal name. When I was single, my work was published in magazines and anthologies under the name of Abigail L. Johnson. After I got married in 2005, I didn’t want to abandon my maiden name altogether. One of my favorite children’s book authors has always been Laura Ingalls Wilder, who used both her maiden and married names when publishing her work. So, I saw no reason why I couldn’t be Abbie Johnson Taylor.

My late husband Bill supported me in my decision. After his paralyzing strokes, when he couldn’t always control his emotions, he would often say, while wearing what he call his shit-eating grin, “My wife, Abbie Johnson Taylor, the published author.” So, that is why the byline for my books and articles always says, “by Abbie Johnson Taylor,” paying homage to the family who raised me and the loving husband who supported my writing endeavors for years until his death.

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How about you authors out there? Have you ever written under a pseudonym? Why? You can sound off in the comment field below or click here to participate in this week’s hop and read what other bloggers have to say.

 

New! Why Grandma Doesn’t Know Me

Copyright 2021 by Abbie Johnson Taylor.

Independently published with the help of DLD Books.

Front cover image contains: elderly woman in red sweater sitting next to a window.

Sixteen-year-old Natalie’s grandmother, suffering from dementia and confined to a wheelchair, lives in a nursing home and rarely recognizes Natalie. But one Halloween night, she tells her a shocking secret that only she and Natalie’s mother know. Natalie is the product of a one-night stand between her mother, who is a college English teacher, and another professor.

After some research, Natalie learns that people with dementia often have vivid memories of past events. Still not wanting to believe what her grandmother has told her, she finds her biological father online. The resemblance between them is undeniable. Not knowing what else to do, she shows his photo and website to her parents.

Natalie realizes she has some growing up to do. Scared and confused, she reaches out to her biological father, and they start corresponding.

Her younger sister, Sarah, senses their parents’ marital difficulties. At Thanksgiving, when she has an opportunity to see Santa Claus, she asks him to bring them together again. Can the jolly old elf grant her request?

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Books

My Amazon Author Page

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Playing Ball with the Dog #SixSentenceStoryThursdayLinkUp #Excerpt

Image contains: Abbie, smiling.

At the park, we took turns throwing the ball for Squeakers, who never tired of retrieving it and bringing it back to us. I got some good pictures of him and even made a little video of him barking at a squirrel he’d chased up a tree.

“Sarah will love this,” I said when I showed it to the others.

“Last night,” said Grandpa, “the way you said that Miss Sarah had appendicitis, I thought you were going to be a doctor. But you’d also make a pretty good photographer.”

“Last night, you said you wanted to be a writer,” said Grandma.

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So, is Natalie’s diagnosis of Sarah’s condition correct? Why did she tell her grandmother she wanted to be a writer? You’ll find the answers to these questions in my new novel, Why Grandma Doesn’t Know Me.

Thanks to Girlie on the Edge for inspiring the above excerpt with her six-sentence story prompt for this week. You can participate in this week’s hop and read other bloggers’ six-sentence creations by clicking here.

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New! Why Grandma Doesn’t Know Me

Copyright 2021 by Abbie Johnson Taylor.

Independently published with the help of DLD Books.

Front cover image contains: elderly woman in red sweater sitting next to a window.

Sixteen-year-old Natalie’s grandmother, suffering from dementia and confined to a wheelchair, lives in a nursing home and rarely recognizes Natalie. But one Halloween night, she tells her a shocking secret that only she and Natalie’s mother know. Natalie is the product of a one-night stand between her mother, who is a college English teacher, and another professor.

After some research, Natalie learns that people with dementia often have vivid memories of past events. Still not wanting to believe what her grandmother has told her, she finds her biological father online. The resemblance between them is undeniable. Not knowing what else to do, she shows his photo and website to her parents.

Natalie realizes she has some growing up to do. Scared and confused, she reaches out to her biological father, and they start corresponding.

Her younger sister, Sarah, senses their parents’ marital difficulties. At Thanksgiving, when she has an opportunity to see Santa Claus, she asks him to bring them together again. Can the jolly old elf grant her request?

***

Books

My Amazon Author Page

Facebook

Website

 

 

I Made a Whole Dollar #SocialMediaMonday

Image contains: Abbie, smiling.

In celebration of Labor Day here in the United States, I’m sharing a post by fellow blogger Patty Fletcher in which she offers a glimpse into her life as an author. It’s not as glamorous an occupation as you might think, and it doesn’t always pay well, but it’s a labor of love.

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My laughter rang out long and loud. The email stated, “Service at PayPal® You’ve received a direct deposit from Amazon®.” When I opened it to see my royalty payment, I laughed even harder. I’d made a whole dollar.

 

Read the full post on Recovering the Self.

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For those of you who use the National Library Service for the Blind and Print Disabled, The Red Dress is available for download from their site here. No matter how you read it, please be sure to review it wherever you can. That goes for all my books. Thank you for stopping by. Stay safe, happy, and healthy.

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New! The Red Dress

Copyright July 2019 by DLD Books

Front cover contains: young, dark-haired woman in red dress holding flowers

When Eve went to her high school senior prom, she wore a red dress that her mother had made for her. That night, after dancing with the boy of her dreams, she caught him in the act with her best friend. Months later, Eve, a freshman in college, is bullied into giving the dress to her roommate. After her mother finds out, their relationship is never the same again.

Twenty-five years later, Eve, a bestselling author, is happily married with three children. Although her mother suffers from dementia, she still remembers, and Eve still harbors the guilt for giving the dress away. When she receives a Facebook friend request from her old college roommate and an invitation to her twenty-five-year high school class reunion, then meets her former best friend by chance, she must confront the past in order to face the future.

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Books

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About Lynda McKinney Lambert #Sunday Sharing

Today’s blogger bio comes from Pennsylvania author and artist Lynda McKinney Lambert. I met Lynda years ago through Behind Our Eyes, an organization of disable writers, to which I belong. She lost her vision later in life, but that hasn’t stopped her from pursuing her passion for the visual arts and the written word. Here’s a little of what she has to say in her own words.

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This is MY STORY…

 

My story  begins in The Village of Wurtemburg,  located in  rural western Pennsylvania.  I was born on August 27, 1943.  I am “Friday’s Child” and born under the  Blueberry Moon. My destiny was to be an artist and writer.  The images of my art and stories and poems are nestled deeply  inside of me.  I unearth them in the solitude of my studio.

Like  many  American children born during this time, I felt the unsettling images that my mother and I experienced during the 2 years of my father’s absence when he was drafted into the Army and had to leave us alone while he fought with troops in Europe. Those images and feelings stay with me, deep inside, and they come to the surface  at solitary times when I make art and write.  

During the years of WW II, we lived with my Aunt Jeanne Hess because both my mother and her sister, Jeanne had husbands who were in the  Army  and were in Europe for 2 years.

We lived in the same  village near my grandparents, Ida and James Kirker.

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Want to know more? Visit Lynda’s website to learn more about her life and work, view samples of her photography, and read some of her poems. You can also read, on my blog, my reviews of her books, Walking by Inner Vision and Star Signs.

By the way, for those of you who use the National Library Services for the Blind and Print Disabled, The Red Dress is available for download from their site here. No matter how you read it, please be sure to review it wherever you can. That goes for all my books. Thank you for stopping by. Stay safe, happy, and healthy.

New! The Red Dress

Copyright July 2019 by DLD Books

Front cover contains: young, dark-haired woman in red dress holding flowers

When Eve went to her high school senior prom, she wore a red dress that her mother had made for her. That night, after dancing with the boy of her dreams, she caught him in the act with her best friend. Months later, Eve, a freshman in college, is bullied into giving the dress to her roommate. After her mother finds out, their relationship is never the same again.

Twenty-five years later, Eve, a bestselling author, is happily married with three children. Although her mother suffers from dementia, she still remembers, and Eve still harbors the guilt for giving the dress away. When she receives a Facebook friend request from her old college roommate and an invitation to her twenty-five-year high school class reunion, then meets her former best friend by chance, she must confront the past in order to face the future.

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My Books

My Amazon Author Page

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Image contains: Abbie, smiling.