You’ll Never Walk Alone #Musical Monday

Image contains: Abbie, smiling.

I was inspired to feature this song after reading about the passing of Jerry Marsden, who sang it with his group, The Pacemakers. But I’m not too impressed with his version. So, after more searching on YouTube, I found this rendition by Josh Groban, who, in my opinion, interprets the song the way it’s meant to be sung.

According to his website, Grammy award nominee Josh Groban has entertained fans around the world with his albums, DVDs, performances, and appearances in films and television shows. Two of his albums were best-sellers in the past decade. He’s been in such movies as Crazy, Stupid Love, The Hollars, Coffee Town, and Muppets Most Wanted. He has also appeared on NBC’s The Office and Always Sunny in Philadelphia and CBS’s The Crazy Ones. His book, Stage to Stage, talks about his journey from popular music and TV and film  to Broadway. You can learn more about him here.

According to Wikipedia, “You’ll Never Walk Alone,” published in 1945, was part of the musical, Carousel, written by Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein. It’s performed by a massed chorus of supporters at association football clubs across the globe. This started after the release of the 1963 single by Gerry and the Pacemakers. In some parts of the UK and Europe, it became the anthem of medical staff, first responders, and those in quarantine as a result of the COVID19 pandemic. Click here to learn more. During these uncertain, unpresidented times as a result of the coronavirus and the events in Washington on January 6th, I hope this song helps you see the golden sky and singing meadowlark at the end of the storm.

By the way, for those of you who use the National Library Service for the Blind and Print Disabled, The Red Dress is available for download from their site here. No matter how you read it, please be sure to review it wherever you can. That goes for all my books. Thank you for stopping by. Stay safe, happy, and healthy.

New! The Red Dress

Copyright July 2019 by DLD Books

Front cover contains: young, dark-haired woman in red dress holding flowers

When Eve went to her high school senior prom, she wore a red dress that her mother had made for her. That night, after dancing with the boy of her dreams, she caught him in the act with her best friend. Months later, Eve, a freshman in college, is bullied into giving the dress to her roommate. After her mother finds out, their relationship is never the same again.

Twenty-five years later, Eve, a bestselling author, is happily married with three children. Although her mother suffers from dementia, she still remembers, and Eve still harbors the guilt for giving the dress away. When she receives a Facebook friend request from her old college roommate and an invitation to her twenty-five-year high school class reunion, then meets her former best friend by chance, she must confront the past in order to face the future.

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I’m Forever Blowing Bubbles #Musical Monday

Image contains: Abbie, smiling.

The song I’m featuring today is one I sang many times when I worked as a registered music therapist with nursing home residents. I was inspired to share it after reading a post from A Unique Title for Me, in which Jim Adams provides a history of the song plus several versions. Here’s a little bit of what he has to say.

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This song became associated with the English West Ham football club which now plays at London Stadium and the fans often sing this song.  One story says that a young player called William Murray, who played for Park School in east London and West Ham’s school boys’ team, was nicknamed ‘Bubbles’ by the headmaster, Cornelius Beal due to his similarity in appearance to the boy in the 1886 painting called ‘Bubbles’ by Sir John Everett Millais, which became famous due to its use in a poster to advertise Pears’ soap.  West Ham fans turned out in big numbers to watch the team, and they would sing this song when the team played well.  Eventually the house band started playing the tune before kick-off and during half-time, encouraging fans to sing along with it.   They started using bubble machines to create the tens of thousands of bubbles for each home game.

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You can read the full article here.

According to Wikipedia, “I’m Forever Blowing Bubbles” was first debuted in 1918 and published in 1919. It became a hit on Tin Pan Alley and was performed and recorded by most major bands and artists during the late 1910’s and early 1920’s, including Ben Selvin’s Novelty Orchestra and the Original Dixieland Jass Band. It was written by John Kellette with lyrics by Jaan Kenbrovin, a collective pseudonym of James Kendis, James Brockman, and Nat Vincent. It debuted in the Broadway show, The Passing Show of 1918 and became popular in British music halls and theaters in the 1920’s, where Dorothy Ward was renowned for making the song famous. It was also used by English comedian Professor Jimmy Edwards, who played it on the trombone. You can learn more here.

Now, here’s a rendition of this song by British singer Vera Lynn, who passed away in June of last year at the age of 103. According to Wikipedia, she was born in March of 1917 and served in the British Entertainments National Services Association from 1939 to 1945. She was widely known as the Forces’ Sweetheart, and her recordings and performances were popular during World War II. She gave outdoor concerts for the troops in Egypt, India, and Burma and is known for such songs as “We’ll Meet Again,” “The White Cliffs of Dover,” and “A Nightingale Sang in Berkeley Square.” You can read more about her here. I hope you enjoy her version of “I’m Forever Blowing Bubbles.”

By the way, for those of you who use the National Library Service for the Blind and Print Disabled, The Red Dress is available for download from their site here. No matter how you read it, please be sure to review it wherever you can. That goes for all my books. Thank you for stopping by. Stay safe, happy, and healthy.

New! The Red Dress

Copyright July 2019 by DLD Books

Front cover contains: young, dark-haired woman in red dress holding flowers

When Eve went to her high school senior prom, she wore a red dress that her mother had made for her. That night, after dancing with the boy of her dreams, she caught him in the act with her best friend. Months later, Eve, a freshman in college, is bullied into giving the dress to her roommate. After her mother finds out, their relationship is never the same again.

Twenty-five years later, Eve, a bestselling author, is happily married with three children. Although her mother suffers from dementia, she still remembers, and Eve still harbors the guilt for giving the dress away. When she receives a Facebook friend request from her old college roommate and an invitation to her twenty-five-year high school class reunion, then meets her former best friend by chance, she must confront the past in order to face the future.

***

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Samuel Barber: Agnus Dei (tune ‘Adagio for Strings’) #Musical Monday

Image contains: Abbie, smiling.On December 15th, 1999, my mother passed away without warning. She’d been battling cancer but had been given a good prognosis a week before. Then, on that afternoon, she lay down to take a nap and never woke up.

Mother had been involved with the local arts council in Sheridan, Wyoming. One of the performances this organization brought to town on a regular basis was a symphony orchestra from Billings, Montana, about 150 miles north of Sheridan. A month after she passed, when the orchestra came to town for their annual concert, in my mother’s memory, they started the program by playing an instrumental version of the choral piece I’m featuring today.

According to Wikipedia, Samuel Barber’s Adagio for Strings was arranged for a string orchestra from the second movement of his String Quartet, Op. 11. Barber finished the arrangement in 1936, the same year he wrote the quartet. The Adagio for Strings was performed in November of 1938 during a radio broadcast by Arturo Toscanini conducting the NBC Symphony Orchestra. The orchestra also played the piece on its South American tour in 1940. It’s the setting of Barber’s 1967 choral arrangement of Agnus Dei, which I’m featuring today. Click here to learn more.

Although I like the string version, when a friend sent me this video containing the choral version, that moved me to tears more than any string orchestra version. So, I’m sharing it today in loving memory of my mother.

By the way, for those of you who use the National Library Service for the Blind and Print Disabled, The Red Dress is available for download from their site here. No matter how you read it, please be sure to review it wherever you can. That goes for all my books. Thank you for stopping by. Stay safe, happy, and healthy.

New! The Red Dress

Copyright July 2019 by DLD Books

Front cover contains: young, dark-haired woman in red dress holding flowers

When Eve went to her high school senior prom, she wore a red dress that her mother had made for her. That night, after dancing with the boy of her dreams, she caught him in the act with her best friend. Months later, Eve, a freshman in college, is bullied into giving the dress to her roommate. After her mother finds out, their relationship is never the same again.

Twenty-five years later, Eve, a bestselling author, is happily married with three children. Although her mother suffers from dementia, she still remembers, and Eve still harbors the guilt for giving the dress away. When she receives a Facebook friend request from her old college roommate and an invitation to her twenty-five-year high school class reunion, then meets her former best friend by chance, she must confront the past in order to face the future.

***

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Auld Lang Syne #Musical Monday

Image contains: Abbie, smiling.

What am I doing New Year’s Eve? Probably what I do every night, stretch out in my recliner with a good book, magazine, podcast, or movie. What did we do on New Year’s Eve when I was growing up? Not a whole lot.

On rare occasions, we went out to eat, but we usually didn’t stay out late. One year, we lit sparklers in the house when the ball dropped on Times Square. Because December in Wyoming was cold and snowy, we didn’t take them outside. It’s a wonder we didn’t burn the house down.

Then, there was the year Dad got pulled over for drunk driving and would have spent the night in jail if Grandma and Uncle Jon hadn’t bailed him out. You see, because my father sold and serviced coin-operated machines, he was often called on New Year’s Eve and other nights to fix a broken jukebox in a bar where there was no other entertainment. On this particular New Year’s Eve, the establishment to which he was called was in a rural area. And, of course, he stayed after fixing the jukebox and enjoyed one too many. Fortunately, a highway patrolman caught him before he could have an accident.

On New Year’s Day, Mother always insisted on taking down the Christmas tree and other decorations. Although everyone was present when the house was decorated, my father and younger brother often had places to go on New Year’s Day, or they were sleeping it off after a night of celebration. So, the task of un-decorating fell to Mother and me.

I loved taking down ornaments just as much as I loved putting them up, fingering the glass balls and snowmen, angels, and other figurines. Although Mother grumbled about the lack of assistance, I didn’t mind. After everything was taken down and put away, I helped her haul the tree to the alley, where it would eventually be picked up by the sanitation department.

What about you? What do you remember doing on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day when you were growing up?

The song I’m singing today is synonymous with ringing in a new year. According to Wikipedia, “Auld Lang Syne” is a Scottish poem written by Robert Burns in 1788 and set to the tune of a traditional folk song. As I’m sure you all know, its traditional use is to bid farewell to the old year at midnight on New Year’s Eve. But it can also be sung at funerals, graduations, and as an ending to other occasions. The phrase, “Auld Lang Syne,” has been used in similar poems by Robert Ayton (1570-1638) Allan Ramsay, (1686-1757) and James Watson. (1711) It’s loosely translated as “for the sake of old times.” To learn more, click here.

If you know the words to “Auld Lang Syne,” you might want to sing along with me. Whatever you do New Year’s Eve, please keep others safe from the coronavirus by not gathering with a large crowd, and please don’t drink and drive. This post is part of Dr. Crystal Grimes’ holiday blogging party. Happy New Year!

By the way, for those of you who use the National Library Service for the Blind and Print Disabled, The Red Dress is available for download from their site here. No matter how you read it, please be sure to review it wherever you can. That goes for all my books. Thank you for stopping by. Stay safe, happy, and healthy.

New! The Red Dress

Copyright July 2019 by DLD Books

Front cover contains: young, dark-haired woman in red dress holding flowers

When Eve went to her high school senior prom, she wore a red dress that her mother had made for her. That night, after dancing with the boy of her dreams, she caught him in the act with her best friend. Months later, Eve, a freshman in college, is bullied into giving the dress to her roommate. After her mother finds out, their relationship is never the same again.

Twenty-five years later, Eve, a bestselling author, is happily married with three children. Although her mother suffers from dementia, she still remembers, and Eve still harbors the guilt for giving the dress away. When she receives a Facebook friend request from her old college roommate and an invitation to her twenty-five-year high school class reunion, then meets her former best friend by chance, she must confront the past in order to face the future.

***

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May You Never Be Alone #Musical Monday

Image contains: Abbie, smiling.

The song I’m singing today is one I featured here last year, but it’s worth an encore performance. According to the artist’s website, Susan Boyle, the Scottish singer whom I’ve heard sing this song, has won fans on both sides of the globe since her performance on Britain’s Got Talent eleven years ago. She has sold over 25 million albums, produced 250 audio streams, and received over 650 million YouTube hits. Among her other accomplishments are a debut acting role in Christmas Candle, a cameo role in Zoolander 2, and three television documentaries. You can learn more about her here.

When I first heard “May You Never Be Alone” a year ago, it was as if my late husband were singing it to me, reassuring me that he was nearby and that we would be reunited. Now, more than ever, this song resonates, since many of us will not be spending the holidays with loved ones in an attempt to keep the coronavirus from spreading. I hope my rendition warms your heart and gives you hope.

This post is part of Dr. Grimes’ holiday blogging party. You can still participate by clicking here.

By the way, for those of you who use the National Library Service for the Blind and Print Disabled, The Red Dress is available for download from their site here. No matter how you read it, please be sure to review it wherever you can. That goes for all my books. Thank you for stopping by. Stay safe, happy, and healthy.

New! The Red Dress

Copyright July 2019 by DLD Books

Front cover contains: young, dark-haired woman in red dress holding flowers

When Eve went to her high school senior prom, she wore a red dress that her mother had made for her. That night, after dancing with the boy of her dreams, she caught him in the act with her best friend. Months later, Eve, a freshman in college, is bullied into giving the dress to her roommate. After her mother finds out, their relationship is never the same again.

Twenty-five years later, Eve, a bestselling author, is happily married with three children. Although her mother suffers from dementia, she still remembers, and Eve still harbors the guilt for giving the dress away. When she receives a Facebook friend request from her old college roommate and an invitation to her twenty-five-year high school class reunion, then meets her former best friend by chance, she must confront the past in order to face the future.

***

My Books

My Amazon Author Page

Facebook

Website