Novel Inspires with Tears and Laughter #Thursday Book Feature

Where Sheep May Safely Graze

by Phyllis Staton Campbell

Copyright 2017

 

What Amazon Says

 

If you’re looking for a book with a blind character, standing high on a pedestal, surrounded by a perfect world, this book isn’t for you. If, however, you’re looking for inspiration laced with laughter and tears, read on. Jim Miller, who was blinded in Iraq, finds his faith tested, as he and his wife, Amy, struggle to adjust to his blindness, and a new marriage. When his congregation forces him to step down, because of his blindness, they accept a church in a mountain town. From there, they look up, and find the will of God.

No, you won’t find a pedestal, but you will find humor as Jim practices his first baptism with a doll, and you will find inspiration as Jim and Amy find their place in the world, and a stronger faith in God. For readers who enjoy the Mitford Series by Jan Karon.

 

My Thoughts

 

I met Phyllis Staton Campbell several years ago when she joined Behind Our Eyes, an organization of disabled writers, of which I’m president. She has published several other books, most of which I enjoyed.

Where Sheep May Safely Graze did not disappoint me. As I read this book, I experienced a wide range of emotions from joy when Jim and Amy were reunited for the first time after his accident, to anger at snooty church officials who didn’t think a blind person could be a pastor. I was moved, almost to tears, when Jim, after losing his sight, seemed to sense when Amy’s face was in front of him and kissed it. My late husband, also totally blind, was like that, too.

Phyllis demonstrates Jim and Amy’s faith in God. But unlike other authors of Christian fiction, she doesn’t let that dominate the story but subtly shows us that God is looking out for her main characters. I love the ending, where Jim and Amy are gazing at a field of sheep. Even if you’re not into Christian fiction, this book will warm your heart and delight you. You’ll also learn that blindness should never stand in a person’s way.

New! The Red Dress

Copyright July 2019 by DLD Books

Front cover contains: young, dark-haired woman in red dress holding flowers

When Eve went to her high school senior prom, she wore a red dress that her mother had made for her. That night, after dancing with the boy of her dreams, she caught him in the act with her best friend. Months later, Eve, a freshman in college, is bullied into giving the dress to her roommate. After her mother finds out, their relationship is never the same again.

Twenty-five years later, Eve, a bestselling author, is happily married with three children. Although her mother suffers from dementia, she still remembers, and Eve still harbors the guilt for giving the dress away. When she receives a Facebook friend request from her old college roommate and an invitation to her twenty-five-year high school class reunion, then meets her former best friend by chance, she must confront the past in order to face the future.

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Coping with Vision Loss #Thursday Book Feature

When You Can’t Believe Your Eyes: Vision Loss and Personal Recovery

by Hannah Fairbairn

Copyright 2019.

 

When you’ve had sight, then lost it, the adjustment process can be difficult. According to her Amazon author page, Hannah Fairbairn lost her sight when she was 33 years old and working as a chef in London. She uses her own experiences plus insights from participants in focus groups at The Carroll Center for the Blind in Massachusetts to provide a short but comprehensive guide to vision loss later in life. Topics include homemaking, mobility, exercise, recreation, and socialization. The book includes resources and references to articles on the author’s website.

Although I’ve been visually impaired since birth, I’ve worked with senior citizens who have lost their vision later in life. So, I was curious as to what advice she would have. Although much of the book didn’t relate to me, I was fascinated by all the tricks she offered. She even gives tips for men on how to use a urinal in a public restroom. I highly recommend this book to seniors and others dealing with vision loss. For those using talking books, it can be downloaded from NLS or obtained through regional libraries.

If Hanna Fairbairn had written a comprehensive guide to being a visually impaired caregiver several years ago, it might have made things easier for me and my late husband. You can read our story in My Ideal Partner: How I Met, Married, and Cared for the Man I Loved Despite Debilitating Odds, which, along with my latest, The Red Dress, is available absolutely free this week from Smashwords as part of its 11th annual Read an eBook Week sale. Smashwords sells books in a variety of accessible formats that can be read on computers or other devices. Click here to download my books. Thank you for reading.

 

New! The Red Dress

Copyright July 2019 by DLD Books

Front cover contains: young, dark-haired woman in red dress holding flowers

When Eve went to her high school senior prom, she wore a red dress that her mother had made for her. That night, after dancing with the boy of her dreams, she caught him in the act with her best friend. Months later, Eve, a freshman in college, is bullied into giving the dress to her roommate. After her mother finds out, their relationship is never the same again.

Twenty-five years later, Eve, a bestselling author, is happily married with three children. Although her mother suffers from dementia, she still remembers, and Eve still harbors the guilt for giving the dress away. When she receives a Facebook friend request from her old college roommate and an invitation to her twenty-five-year high school class reunion, then meets her former best friend by chance, she must confront the past in order to face the future.

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Thursday Book Feature: Walking by Inner Vision

Image contains: Abbie, smiling.I reviewed this book a couple of years ago when it first came out. Now, it’s available on Audible with a good narrator. I found it well worth the seconcd read.

 

via Thursday Book Feature: Walking by Inner Vision

 

 

Thursday Book Feature: Words of Life

Image contains: Abbie, smiling.

Words of Life: Essays and Poems

By Ann Chiappetta

Copyright 2019

 

From the author of Upwelling and Follow Your Dog comes a short collection of poetry and prose on family vacations, vision loss, animals, and other topics. It also includes a work of flash fiction. An introduction by the author explains what inspired this compilation.

I met Ann Chiappetta through Behind Our Eyes, an organization of writers with disabilities. I like how she writes about the lighter and darker sides of life. My favorite piece is one in which she describes how she rescued two baby sparrows, only one of whom survived, and the hard lesson her eight-year-old son learned from this experience. I recommend this book, which not only provides insight on vision loss but on other negative and positive aspects of life.

 

My Books

 

My Ideal Partner: How I Met, Married, and Cared for the Man I Loved Despite Debilitating Odds

That’s Life: New and Selected Poems

How to Build a better Mousetrap: Recollections and Reflections of a Family Caregiver

We Shall Overcome

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Memoir Offers Insight into Vision Loss

Cane Confessions: The Lighter Side to Mobility

by Amy Bovairde

Copyright 2016

 

This Christian author and motivational speaker shares her humorous experiences with vision loss. She describes accidents she had as a teen-ager while learning to drive and even as an adult, which makes readers wonder whether she was already starting to lose her vision before she was diagnosed with Retinitis Pigmentosa. She talks about her teaching and world travels: visiting a spa in India, hiking in Scotland, and climbing Mount Fuji in Japan, all while denying to herself and not admitting to others that she was losing her eyesight. With humor, she describes her adventures in shopping, gardening, cooking and other activities while still in the denial stage.

She describes how she learned to use a cane and how much she hated it because it symbolized her blindness. She explains how she eventually realized that a cane equals independence despite having a visual impairment. She discusses how her motivational speaking career took off after she was asked to be the keynote speaker at a women’s retreat and how she joined a Lions Club after presenting at a benefit for the Leader Dog program.

Many of her anecdotes made me laugh, like the time she became entangled with a group of airmen on a military base while teaching there. I was frustrated with her when she described mishaps that could have been avoided, had she been using her cane. Of course I’ve dealt with low vision all my life, but when you’ve had sight and lose it, that’s a whole new ball game.

I can appreciate this book’s three powerful messages. Don’t be afraid to admit that you can’t see very well. Don’t be ashamed to use a white cane or other adaptive tool, and don’t hesitate to ask for help. If you’ve just lost your vision, this book will help you realize that it’s not the end of the world and that you’re not alone. If you don’t have a visual impairment, you’ll still appreciate the insight on vision loss. In fact, I highly recommend this book to non-disabled professionals working with people who have visual impairments.

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Author Abbie Johnson Taylor

We Shall Overcome

How to Build a Better Mousetrap: Recollections and Reflections of a Family Caregiver

That’s Life: New and Selected Poems

My Ideal Partner: How I Met, Married, and Cared for the Man I Loved Despite Debilitating Odds

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